OKC National Memorial and Museum, Oklahoma City

5 out of 5 stars 40 Reviews

620 N. Harvey 405.235.3313 or 888.542.HOPE

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  • OKC National Memorial and Museum
    by DennyP
  • PART OF
    PART OF "THE FIELD OF CHAIRS"
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  • THE MYRIAD OF REMEMBERANCE ITEMS LEFT ON WALLS
    THE MYRIAD OF REMEMBERANCE ITEMS LEFT ON...
    by DennyP
  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Oklahoma City National Memorial

    by Yaqui Updated Dec 30, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I am thankful I went with friends to see this momument. It made it joyful to be with them otherwise I would have been to sadden to stay. They did a wonderful job in the building and design of this monument in paying tribute to those we all lost so dear that day on April 19, 1995 at 9:02am. I think we all hope and prayed it would never happen again, but 911 has changed that hope forever. The gates of time, reflecting pool and all the empty chairs, especially the litte ones will always be etched in my memory and heart. God bless them all!

    "Never give up and never forget!"

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  • rexvaughan's Profile Photo

    Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum

    by rexvaughan Updated Jul 14, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Poignantly Serene

    This is a very moving memorial to those who were killed on April 19, 1995 by the bomb that Timothy McVeigh detonated in front of the Alfred Murrah Office Building. The building housed offices for several government agencies and a day care facility for their children. The bomb exploded at 9:02 a.m. and the outdoor memorial features two walls at the ends of a reflecting pool. The walls are labeled 9:01 and 9:03, enclosing the tragic moment. In the photo to the left you can see 168 chairs, one for each victim including smaller ones for the children. This is a very moving and poignantly beautiful memorial. I have not visited the museum yet, but my wife found it very well done and moving saying she had never seen one like it. It is probably the most must see of sights in the city.

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    will man ever learn

    by richiecdisc Written May 7, 2009

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    the eery empty seats, a symbol of those lost
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    The Oklahoma National Memorial is both a monument to the people killed in the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City and those who reached out to help as well as a museum to help teach visitors the impact of violence. It is a stark reminder of man's inhumanity to man, much like visiting a Nazi concentration camp though it is an artistic representation rather than a historical collection of buildings or remnants thereof. It is, however, just as powerful. The most moving is a plot of land filled with empty chairs, one for each person killed in the bombing. Particularly sad are the small ones, representing the children. The museum supposedly is quite a learning experience but with time limited and it not being included in our National Parks Pass, we opted to spend the time solely in the memorial proper. It's not a can't miss attraction in the US for foreign travelers or those with a shortage of time but for those passing this way on Route 66, it's a place to take a break and contemplate the preciousness of life itself.

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  • msbrandysue's Profile Photo

    OKC National Memorial and Museum

    by msbrandysue Updated Jun 25, 2007

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    Memorial
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    On April 19, 1995 Oklahoma City suffered a terrorist attack and one of the government buildings was bombed. The site where the building once stood and the street where the truck was parked are now a national memorial.

    The atmosphere is so tranquil and really respectful. There is nothing but the sound of nature and whispers (except for a few people who didn't show courtesy).

    After walking through the memorial there is a spot to the side which is considered the children's area. There are tiled messages from children that sent in cards for the grieving city. On the other side are tiles of handprints that were sent as gifts.

    Inside the museum, there is a timeline of the events leading up to the bombing. You, then, go into a room where you hear a recorded city meeting and then you hear the bomb go off. The lights flicker and then up on a screen the faces of all those who died in the bombing are up. A separate set of doors open and you go through a section that is all about the immediate aftermath of the bombing. There are glasses, children's shoes, coffee cups, and more found in the wreckage. There are interviews of survivors, family members, emergency crew and more. There are telecasts of reports from around the world. There is a section dedicated to the heros who stayed hours to help retrieve victims. Then there is an FBI section that shows how they caught the killer and the accomplice. At the end are individual areas for each victim. It so touching and truly heartbreaking but I really understood what it is to feel pride for the country you live in.

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  • BixB's Profile Photo

    Oklahoma City National Memorial

    by BixB Updated Sep 18, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    OKC National Memorial at dusk
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    Built upon the site of the former Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, the Oklahoma City National Memorial provides a fitting monument to the 149 adults and 19 children killed on April 19, 1995, in the worst act of domestic terrorism in U.S. history. It also honors all who responded to the event with caring and compassion.

    The Memorial consists of a shallow black-bottomed relecting pool that stretches the length of the building's footprint. It is flanked by two large bronze gates. Each are etched with the numerals of a digital clock. The east gate bears the time 9:01, the moment immediately before the blast. The west gate reflects 9:03, the moment immediately after.

    To the south of the pool is a field of 168 empty bronze chairs resting upon glass bases. 19 of the chairs are markedly smaller than the rest. Each base is etched with the name of a person who perished in the event and at night they are illuminated from within.

    To the north of the pool is a raised terrace on which is located the "Survivor Tree." It is an American elm that withstood the full force of the explosion. In the days following the attack, it became a symbol of the strength and resiliency of the Oklahoma City community. It is surrounded by flowering and fruit trees, which symbolise the outpouring of support from the nation and the world.

    Integral to the site is also the Memorial Museum, housed immediately south of the outdoor memorial. Through artifacts, photographs, and audio and video presentations, the museum tells the story of the event in 10 "chapters." Beginning with the quiet of an ordinary day, it takes visitors through the chaos of April 19, as well as the response and recovery. The "Gallery of Honor" room presents images of each person that died, along with a personal item selected to represent the individual by their family.

    The Oklahoma City National Memorial stands as a witness to both the worst and the best of which mankind is capable. A visit to its hallowed ground is sure to move you to reflect upon its lessons.

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  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Lights Welcome

    by mrclay2000 Updated Mar 30, 2003

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    Oklahoma City National Memorial at night

    If at all possible, visit the Memorial at night as well as by day. The contrast is remarkable. An evening visit also affords to the visitor the illuminated stained-glass windows on the First United Methodist Church (east of the Memorial) and the illuminated domes of the CityChurch a few blocks away to the north.

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    Scene of the Crime

    by mrclay2000 Updated Mar 29, 2003

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    outer corner, Oklahoma City National Memorial

    This picture depicts the open space where once stood the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building. Only the staircases and some hardened walls remain of the original structure. At the left in the photo is St Joseph's Cathedral, and in the background the Regency Towers, many of whose windows were blown out during the bombing. Designs for the National Memorial were chosen by a committee comprised of family members, survivors, rescuers, civil leaders and design professionals.

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    Wall of Remembrance

    by mrclay2000 Updated Mar 30, 2003

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    flags, teddy bears and personal artefacts

    Almost immediately after the bombing, a chain-link fence was erected to preserve the site, but instead served to preserve the memories of the fallen. Nineteen children died in the second-floor daycare. The subsequent inflow from children around the nation of "care bears" literally overwhelmed the fence, along with photos, mementos and other tokens left by family and friends. This section is the "living" statement of the Memorial.

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    And Jesus Wept

    by mrclay2000 Written Mar 29, 2003

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    And Jesus Wept

    West of the Memorial grounds stands this small sculpture of Jesus with his face covered in agony. The sculpture stands with its back to the Memorial, as if looking away with a heavy heart. Today, the robes are embroidered with layer after layer of lipstick imprints leading all the way to the Christ's own cheek.

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    A Place for Reflection

    by mrclay2000 Written Mar 29, 2003

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    West Gate and Regency Tower

    The reflecting pool divides the two Gates of Time, which "frame the moment of destruction" of 9:02 a.m. The east gate reads "9:01," signifying the last moment of innocence as we pursued our regular lives. The west gate is marked "9:03," when our lives changed forever. In the background (also reflected in the pool) is the Regency Tower.

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  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Empty Chairs

    by mrclay2000 Updated Mar 29, 2003

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    168 empty chairs

    Along the lawn south of the reflecting pool are 168 empty chairs representing the lives lost. Each is engraved with the victim's name, with the smaller chairs representing the murdered children. Visitors are required to keep to the walk encircling the chairs. Only family members are allowed to approach the markers directly.

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  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Night Falls

    by mrclay2000 Written Mar 29, 2003

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    sundown behind the west Gate of Time

    With the coming of twilight, the perspectives at the Oklahoma City National Memorial change significantly. By day, the monument is a sober reminder of a terrible event in our history. By night, the memorial is a beautiful place.

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    168 Empty Chairs Illumined

    by mrclay2000 Written Mar 29, 2003

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    168 chairs and St Anthony's Hospital (background)

    Along with the perimeter structures and the Gates of Time, the 168 empty chairs glow in a surreal if not heavenly light. The effects of all ambient light on the reflecting pool is something not to be missed with any nocturnal visit to Oklahoma City. In the background center, you can plainly see the light blue illuminated edge of St Anthony's Hospital, one of many area hospitals under code black on April 19, 1995.

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  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Oklahoma's Worst Day - April 19, 1995

    by mrclay2000 Updated Mar 29, 2003

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    Murrah Building, days after the blast

    I was in my boss' office at 9:00 a.m. on April 19, a bright and cloudless day, when a convulsion rumbled up from the south and rattled the windows going north. The effects were electrifying, as co-workers struggled to determine the cause. I imagined three possibilities (a) that a small plane in distress had passed just over our office, (b) that our nearby 5-story-tall newspaper presses had collapsed, or (c) that we had just felt an earthquake. A few minutes later I heard the first news about "a bomb." In our relative innocence, we little understood the meaning. "What's a bomb?"

    When the blast occurred, employees at the south end of our building turned to see a column of smoke tower over downtown. Within seconds the windows by which they stood trembled so violently -- even from 10 miles away -- that many feared they would explode. Downtown was a pandemonium. As events unfolded, radios educated the city on medical terminology. Triage - the bloodied and battered are divided by the severity of their wounds. Code black - overcrowded hospitals can accept no more patients.

    Medical personnel were flown free to OKC to assist. Little towns in Oklahoma emptied out to donate blood. By mid-afternoon, the skies darkened and began to rain on the rescuers and rescued alike. By nightfall, the number recovered was comparatively small at 20. In the end, 168 lives would be claimed, including 19 children. Today, Oklahoma City drivers run their headlights every April 19 to commemorate our common experience.

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    VISIT THE OKLAHOMA CITY NATIONAL MEMORIAL

    by DennyP Written Oct 2, 2013

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    PART OF
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    OKLAHOMA CITY
    Located between Robinson And Harvey Avenues and 4th and 6th Streets is the Oklahoma City Memorial dedicated to the many 168 innocent victims of the Federal Building bombing on April 19th 1995.There is inscriptions on the large walls at the entrance ..one reads " MAY ALL THAT LEAVE HERE KNOW THE IMPACT OF VIOLENCE"..

    The entrance brings you to a lovely reflecting pool with a large wall structure at each end that displays a digital time readout of the time the explosion took place. The one end reads 9.01 (before) and the other end reads 9.03 (after) in the middle of the reflecting pool is 9.02 the time of the devistating explosion that destroyed the very building on which site this memorial stands today..One side of the reflecting pool is a grassed area that is bordered by trees and is the actual area where the original building stood.for here is where stands 168 bronze chairs..one for each of the victims.. the smaller of the chairs denote the many children that were innocent victims here..
    At dusk the chairs light up and take on a warm glow and to walk through this grassed area of these many chairs one is really taken by the amount of chairs especially the small ones.
    At dusk there is also a naration of the days events and the bombing by a "Ranger" of the National Park Service by the reflecting pool. To the other side of the reflecting pool is the "Survivor Tree" a large American Elm tree that dates back to 1927..This tree still stands against all odds and still contains many pieces of shrapnel from the bomb blast..
    RANGERS ARE ON SITE 9.00AM --5,30 PM.
    ADMISSION IS FREE
    OUTDOOR MEMORIAL OPEN 24 HOURS DAILY.

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