Crater Lake National Park Warnings and Dangers

  • D makes me eat my words or at least a bit of snow
    D makes me eat my words or at least a...
    by richiecdisc
  • Warning Sign
    Warning Sign
    by Basaic
  • Warning Sign
    Warning Sign
    by Basaic

Most Recent Warnings and Dangers in Crater Lake National Park

  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    CONIFER POLLEN

    by mtncorg Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Conifer pollen along lakeshore - Cleetwood Cove

    The waters of Crater Lake are some of the clearest in the World. There are very few impurities within its waters - also no outlets and the water is from snow and rain. Deep blue colors are due to the Lake's depth. Of the visual spectrum, only the deep blue wavelengths are scattered back to the surface; all other wavelengths are absorbed in the depths.

    Mid summer finds huge amounts of pollen alot from the vast surrounding coniferous forests. Evidence of the procreative attempts of the trees is found on the Lake surface where yellowish ribbons can even be seen from the Rim above.

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  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    a place for big snows

    by richiecdisc Updated Oct 16, 2009

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    D makes me eat my words or at least a bit of snow

    Crater Lake National Park gets more than its share of snow. The Pacific Northwest is noted for precipitation and the lake's elevation and relative location to northwesterly winds makes for lots of it. The average snowfall is 44 feet per year so it's no wonder that the Rim Road is not open in winter. At this elevation, snow can linger well into summer.

    When we arrived in early July 2008 we learned that a third of the Rim Road was still not open for the season due to very high snowfall and an unusually cold spring. Though it made getting around a bit tougher, it was great for us to have so much snow to play in since we live in South Florida and do not get to see it much. Also, it made for some beautiful photos as the peaks ringing the lake were all still heavily covered in the white stuff.

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    • Photography

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  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    DO NOT FEED THE ANIMALS

    by mtncorg Updated Nov 6, 2003

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    Breaking the Rules?

    Birds and animals are a part of the natural ecosystem and you are not supposed to feed them. Depencency on human food might lead the animal to not being able to survive the long winter, though, with the abundance of squirrels and Clark nutcrackers at Rim Village, you might think that is a moot point.

    This lady is to be excused as she is German and I didn't translate all of the rules to her :-/

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  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    DON'T FEED THE ANIMALS

    by mtncorg Written Nov 6, 2003

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    Somebody is hungry?

    The Clark's Nutcracker is a pretty little bird that is probably bolder, in general, thatn even a blue jay, which says quite a lot. They will fly down to your hand in the remotest backcountry to take a nut. Here, in Rim Village, they have no fear whatsoever. But the rules are, you are not to feed them, so if there is a Ranger or Mrclay2000 around, put your gorp away.

    This couple is to be excused as they are German and I still did not translate all of the rules! ;-}

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    • Camping

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  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    SNOW

    by mtncorg Written Nov 6, 2003

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    Over August snows from atop Garfield Peak

    Snow can lie across the Rim Drive until very late in the season. Seasons can also change very quickly up here. One day, it will be warm and sunny and the next day, someone turns the switch and winter is back again.

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    • National/State Park

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  • Basaic's Profile Photo

    Warning Signs

    by Basaic Written Mar 2, 2010

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    Warning Sign
    1 more image

    Please obey all warning signs; they are there for your safety and to protect the park for future visitors. Stay away from the cliffs they sometimes give way.

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  • WAHomeschool's Profile Photo

    Cliffs and Bears

    by WAHomeschool Written Aug 3, 2003

    If you go hiking, OBEY the rules. There really are bears here.

    OBEY the posted signs. The cliffs are steep and deadly. Stay on the trails.

    Related to:
    • Camping
    • Family Travel

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Crater Lake National Park Warnings and Dangers

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