Depoe Bay Things to Do

  • Inside the whale center
    Inside the whale center
    by ZanieOR
  • 'Whale spoken here'
    'Whale spoken here'
    by ZanieOR
  • Things to Do
    by 10eke

Most Recent Things to Do in Depoe Bay

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    Whale watching center

    by ZanieOR Updated Aug 15, 2008

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    Inside the whale center
    1 more image

    There's a very neat whale watching center (complete with out-of-the-weather viewing window and telescope thing) along the ocean right in town along the highway.
    It also serves as a Depoe Bay museum, with photographs, arctifacts and history.

    One of the many interesting things was an explanation of how Depoe Bay got it’s name (I’ll paraphrase). A young Indian from the coast’s Joshua tribe gained the nickname Depot Charley from soldiers when he worked at Depot Slough, a dock in Toledo where supplies were delivered for the coastal reservation.
    He evenually earned respect as a tribal judge and helping restore tribal traditions. When the lands of the reservation were divided between remaining residents, he and his family were allotted the area known as Depoe Bay, so named because of a misspelling mistake on government documents, which gave him the name Charles DePoe. The first post office opened in 1928, the government simpilified the spelling by making the “p” lower case.
    I’m not sure what happened to Charley, but the answer is probably in the whale center.

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    • Whale Watching
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel

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    BOILER BAY

    by mtncorg Written Oct 27, 2004

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    Waves rolling into Boiler Bay

    A dramatic wayside park along US 101 just north of Depoe Bay, Boiler Bay presents a dramatic view over the breakers churning around the small bay and northwards towards Lincoln City and Cascade Head beyond. In the early 1900's a ship caught fire offshore, drifted in here and burnt. At low tide, the ship's boiler can still be seen, hence the name. The constant roll of the smashing waves, bits of kelp floating between breakers, is hypnotic.

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    • Beaches
    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park

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    DEVIL'S PUNCHBOWL

    by mtncorg Written Oct 27, 2004

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    Waves churning into Devil's Punchbowl

    A large sea cave carved from sandstone had its roof collapse after centuries of wave erosion. That process continues through two openings in the seaward wall. From atop, you can gaze down as the waves continue to brew. A trail to the north leads down to some nice tide pools where you can spot sea urchins and starfish. To the south and east, there are picnic tables and a walkway down to access the northern end of Beverly Beach - popular with surfers. There is also a small restaurant - Otter Rock Mo's - one of a local chain centered in nearby Newport - and the small Flying Dutchman winery.

    The Devil is a popular figure along the Coast with several features named for him/her: Devil's Lake, Devil's Elbow, Devil's Churn, Devil's Punchbowl....

    Related to:
    • Whale Watching
    • National/State Park
    • Beaches

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    CAPE FOULWEATHER

    by mtncorg Written Oct 27, 2004

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    View south over Otter Crest to Yaquina Head

    From atop this 500-foot high headland, you can see out to 40 miles at sea on a clear day. Captain James Cook named the headland on March 7, 1778 on a day of storm-tossed seas. Storm-tossed or not, Cook was moving since he also spotted Cape Perpetua, 40 miles south, on the same day. There are grand views towards Yaquina Head to the south marred only by buildings of the condo resort of the Inn at Otter Crest. Next to the parking lot is a small gift shop perched precariously high above the sea.

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    • Whale Watching
    • Beaches
    • Historical Travel

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    DEPOE BAY BRIDGE

    by mtncorg Written Oct 27, 2004

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    Depoe Bay Bridge

    Directly over the harbor entrance is the dramatic Depoe Bay Bridge carrying US 101. The bridge is a single span reinforced concrete arch built in 1927 and as many other concrete arched bridges along US 101, Conde McCullough, Oregon State Bridge Engineer from 1919-1935, also designed this. Depoe Bay State Park is located on the north side of the bay's entrance next to the bridge, giving you a grand view over the boats coming in and out of the harbor.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Architecture

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  • 10eke's Profile Photo

    The Harbor

    by 10eke Written Oct 4, 2002

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    Depoe Bay is the largest natural bay in Oregon. It can only be accessed by a narrow gap, just wide enough to let a boat pass into the harbor. It was used in the Jack Nicholson movie ‘One flew over the cuckoo’s nest’. This is the harbor from which Jack and his friends went on their fishing trip.

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    10eke's Things to Do Tip

    by 10eke Written Oct 4, 2002

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    This is the harbor entrance through the rocks, which can accommodate boats up to fifty feet in length.

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Depoe Bay Things to Do

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