Florence Things to Do

  • Sea Lion Lookout
    Sea Lion Lookout
    by dustmon
  • what you can see from the lookout
    what you can see from the lookout
    by dustmon
  • nesting pigeon guillemot
    nesting pigeon guillemot
    by dustmon

Most Recent Things to Do in Florence

  • joiwatani's Profile Photo

    We booked our activity through Sand Dunes Frontier

    by joiwatani Written Jan 12, 2013
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    We booked our activity through Sand Dunes Frontier. They have experienced tour guides and drivers. We love our driver because he knows which part to stop in the sand dunes and he was very sensitive to the customers.

    When we were on the sand dune truck, a kid started crying and he tried to tell the parents what to do and he also tried to avoid the huge dips in the sand dunes!

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    Sea Lion Caves

    by dustmon Written May 14, 2012
    Sea Lion Lookout
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    We were a little leery of coming here, as it is a pretty garish tourist site, but we wanted to see some sea lions close up and decided to brave the scene...Glad we did!!! The lookout has views of over 200 sea lions (with a telephoto lens they show up very well!) and we also saw some rare birds nesting up in the upper reaches of the caves---there is an elevator down to the cave where there were around 75 sea lions resting and playing....
    I would definitely recommend this to anyone with a camera....

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  • Just 60 miles West of Eugene

    by jennab97439 Written Feb 14, 2012

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    Dunes
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    Just 60 miles West of Eugene, Florence offers one of a kind attractions, outdoor activities, unique festivals, exciting events and spectacular scenery

    Experience the serenity of the Oregon Coast with a scenic tour by air and view the historic Heceta Head Lighthouse and the miles of coastal dunes and trails, ideal for hiking, dune buggy riding and ATV riding. Back on land, enjoy the natural beauty of the Florence Oregon Coast by biking or birding for the more than 450 birds that have been recorded in its habitats.

    If you are looking for a day of fun at the beach, the Florence Oregon Coast is a kite flyers' paradise. Our beaches are great for claming or horse back riding! Florence is perfect for deep sea and fresh water fishing, crabbing, diving, kayaking, paddle boat, scuba diving, skim boarding, snorkeling, swimming, surfing, water-skiing, wave-boarding or windsurfing.

    In addition to the spectacular Sea Lion Caves, Florence offers many locations perfect for Whale Watching or tide pooling.

    After a busy day of shopping, golfing or exploring the area's many attractions enjoy a dinner and a movie, dance to live music in Historic Old Town Florence or catch a show at the Three Rivers Casino & Hotel or at the Florence Events Center.

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    Siuslaw Pioneer Museum

    by Maria250 Updated Aug 8, 2011

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    Siuslaw Pioneer Museum
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    Displays relics and historical information featuring the Siuslaw River and its pioneers. Home life, farming, fishing, lumbering and transportation are shown in displays and pictures. Wheelchair ramp. Closed Mondays. Cost $2 per person. Closed in December. Very nice lady & Mister doing the intro & tour. We enjoyed very much the impressive sights/informations on history.

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    Florence Dunes

    by Maria250 Updated Aug 8, 2011

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    Oregon
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    The beaches in the Florence area, and extending to the south are expansive and allow for all the great beach activities, including just playing in the sand or taking a relaxing stroll amongst the dunes and numerous sea birds that populate the coastal areas.

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    Where the forest meets sand & sea III

    by Maria250 Updated Aug 8, 2011

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    Oregon
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    Something moves which isn't there
    you turn to look but it's gone, it's gone
    Was it ever really there
    Yet it touches you
    Softly touches you
    And then it begins again

    The scent of roses
    The sound of the sea
    A breath of wind in your face

    They take you back
    They take you there
    To that place
    And you want so much
    To feel that touch

    But you can't go back
    No you can't go back
    -Rebecca Lavelle

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  • GuthrieColin's Profile Photo

    Sea Lion Info

    by GuthrieColin Updated Apr 4, 2011
    Sea Lions On the Rocks Outside the Cave
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    The accessibility to the caves is done by entering the gift shop from the street level. You will need to buy a ticket to get to the cliff face and elevator. The tickets are as follows:
    16+ - $8.00
    6-15 - $4.50
    -5 - Free
    The Steller Sea lion population near the sea caves is about 200 animals. The migration ranges from central California to The Bering Sea. The Sea Lions have many resting locations along that trip but these Sea Caves are the only mainland pit stop.
    Steller Sea Lions are the largest of their family and bulls typically weigh about 1500 pounds but large animals can easily top 2000 pounds. Females are smaller and typically reach about 700 pounds. Females can reach 9 feet from nose to tail and males about 12 feet. They can swim at about 17 miles per hour and live about 20 years.
    This large size makes the animals void of many natural predators. Only the killer whale presents a threat. The animals main way of avoiding that threat is by getting out of the water and seeking refuge on the shore.

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    Views from the Sea Lion Caves

    by GuthrieColin Updated Apr 4, 2011
    Ocean Meeting the Dunes near Florence
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    The accessibility to the caves is done by entering the gift shop from the street level. You will need to buy a ticket to get to the cliff face and elevator. The tickets are as follows:
    16+ - $8.00
    6-15 - $4.50
    -5 - Free
    There are several great views to be had in the park. The best ones I found were looking to the south toward the city of Florence. The ocean meeting the dunes was a very stark contrast from this viewpoint.
    The other great views are of looking to the north and viewing the Haceta Head Lighthouse. Inside the cave there is a viewpoint that is accessible by taking a stairway up from the floor of the cave. It peeks out over the cliffs and to the lighthouse.

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  • GuthrieColin's Profile Photo

    Sea Lion Cave

    by GuthrieColin Updated Apr 4, 2011
    Steller Sea Lions Perched on Rock
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    The accessibility to the caves is done by entering the gift shop from the street level. You will need to buy a ticket to get to the cliff face and elevator. The tickets are as follows:
    16+ - $8.00
    6-15 - $4.50
    -5 - Free
    Once on the grounds you can walk to the overlooking shed and see the landscape around the area or go along the other path to the elevator and descend into the cave. Each path is less than 400 feet.
    The elevator drops 208 feet to the cave level where you will be greeted with loud noise from the Sea Lions barking and the water crashing as well as the pungent smell of Sea Lion (not pleasant). Inside the Cave visitors are encouraged to not use their cameras flash as it may scare or irritate the animals.
    The Cave is the largest in the world with a floor area of about 2 acres and a ceiling that is about 125 feet above the sea level.

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  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    LAKE CREEK/NELSON MOUNTAIN BRIDGE

    by mtncorg Written Aug 31, 2010
    Mtncorg at the Lake Creek Bridge
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    Found just off OR 36 roughly halfway between the Coast and the Willamette Valley, this bridge – like the nearby Deadwood Creek Bridge – boasts upper and lower chords of one-piece old growth timber – 14” x 14” x 111 feet on the lower and 12” x 12” x 79 feet above. Dating back to 1928, the bridge last underwent major rehabilitation in 1984. Like many Lane County bridges, interior lighting is provided by ribbon eave windows. Look for the span about 5-8 miles west of the popular Triangle Lake. Visible from OR 36 as it runs through one of its rare straight stretches. OF the two routes between the Coast – Florence – and the Willamette Valley, OR 126 is more the direct and faster route. OR 36 twists and turns following Lake Creek for most of its course and then a short section of the Siuslaw River. It is the prettier route, but also the slower.

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    DEADWOOD CREEK BRIDGE

    by mtncorg Written Aug 31, 2010
    Mtncorg gives you the Deadwood Creek Bridge
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    This little gem is hidden deep in the mountains and forests of the Coast Range. Most people – Oregonians included – know little about the mountains that separate the Willamette Valley from the Coast – unless they hunt, fish or drive off-road vehicles. Originally it was thought the mountains were only penetrable in a couple of places – only two forts were deemed necessary to separate the Willamette Valley pioneers from the Native Americans living on the Coast Indian Reservation – Fort Hoskins and Fort Yamhill. Today, 150 years later, there are at least a dozen major routes across and many lesser ones. And within the mountains, there are routes within routes. This is what you find by going up Deadwood Creek.

    The bridge was built in 1932. Unique to its construction is the slanted floor, built so cars could traverse the bridge easier coming around an approach curve. There is a full-length window on the west side to allow oncoming traffic to be seen from within the bridge. Top and bottom chords are built from one-piece old growth timber. Bypassed in the 1970’s, the bridge had a lot of restoration needed when it was saved in 1986. Deep in its forested canyon lair, the bridge dwells in arboreal splendor hidden from most visitors except for one sign pointing the way in off the newer Deadwood Creek road.

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  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    WILDCAT BRIDGE (AUSTA)

    by mtncorg Written Aug 31, 2010
    Mtncorg tastes the waters of Wildcat Creek
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    This bridge is a bit removed from Florence, located about halfway between Eugene and Florence just off the main highway OR 126. The Wildcat Bridge dates to 1925 crossing Wildcat Creek at its confluence with Siuslaw River – the location is what really sets the bridge apart. A boat ramp just north of the bridge – Austa Ramp – ensures a continued need for the bridge which has been bypassed by the busy concrete span OR 126 rushes across. A typical Lane County covered bridge; there are ribbon windows at the eaves and rounded entries with a window on the west side allowing oncoming traffic to be seen from within the bridge.

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  • Camping_Girl's Profile Photo

    Camping in the dunes

    by Camping_Girl Written May 25, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    We stayed at the Horsfalls Campground, just across the bay from Coos Bay. It was a lovely, peaceful campground with wonderfully large campsites. Free firewood was provided. There is a $5 entrance fee to access the sand dunes area, and the camping was an additional $15 USD per night.

    There were flush toilets and hot running water, but no showers.

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    Umpqua Beach Lighthouse

    by Camping_Girl Written May 25, 2008

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    Another of the old historic lighthouses along highway 101. This one is a little smaller than the first one we looked at.

    This state park had a lovely campground attached to it, but we decided to push further south before we stopped for the night.

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  • Camping_Girl's Profile Photo

    Sand Dunes

    by Camping_Girl Written May 25, 2008

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    That's the ocean, behind the dunes
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    There are many camping spots along the dunes, but be forewarned, most of them are party central! For some reason partiers love coming out to the dunes to camp, drink and race around in the sand... we found nice quiet family camping at Coos Bay.

    There are outfits that will rent you buggys to take out on the sand, if you don't have your own.

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Florence Things to Do

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