Hood River Things to Do

  • Mt Hood Railroad
    Mt Hood Railroad
    by Herkbert
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    Market in Parkdale
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  • Mt Hood
    Mt Hood
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Most Recent Things to Do in Hood River

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    Take windsurfing lessons!!

    by squidly2 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    Why just watch the windsurfers when you can join them? We took lessons in a small lagoon, about 15 minutes on land, then about an hour and a half in the water. I wish I had pictures. It was aweome!! (Though tiring!) It was about $150 for 2 of us to take private lessons together, almost the same as 2 individuals taking the group class. Though the website said it didn't include equipment, they didn't charge us anything extra.
    Our instrucotr (forget her name) was very helpful, and we were really up and windsurfing pretty well within abut 30 minutes. It's not too hard to get a feel for it (and super safe in the lagoon). We took them through "Big Winds".

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    HUSUM FALLS AND THE WHITEWATER OF THE WHITE SALMON

    by mtncorg Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Kayaker drops over Husum Falls

    20 miles north of Hood River on the Washington side of the Columbia, is the whitewater center of Husum. Kayakers and rafters can put in five miles upriver at BZ Corner and run nonstop class 4 and 3 rapids at the bottom of a deep lava cliffed canyon. Right at Husum, the 12 foot high Husum Falls, a class five affair, finishes the run. The same ground can be covered by more normal folks by taking one of the several half day rafting trips offered by local companies - wet suits and helmets covered in the price. Immediately downstream from the falls are kayak slaloms which attest to summertime contests.

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    • Water Sports
    • Rafting
    • Kayaking

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    Take a ride on the Mt Hood Railroad

    by Herkbert Written Dec 13, 2010

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    Mt Hood Railroad
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    The Hood River Railroad offers excursions from Hood River to Odell or Parkdale. The round trip takes about 4 hours and is a relaxing ride through orchards, vineyards, lumber yards and other scenery, with Mt Hood or Mt Adams always peeking around the corner.

    When you arrive in Parkdale, you have time to grab a quick bite or just take in the awesome view of Mt Hood. We managed to grab a sandwich at the deli and still have plenty of time to take some pictures before re-boarding the train for the journey back.

    It isn't exciting, but it is pleasant and a delightful way to see some of the surrounding area.

    Tickets were $30 each, but you can usually find discounts available (at least everyone else seemed to.).

    Related to:
    • Trains
    • Photography

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    Twin Tunnels

    by glabah Updated Jun 27, 2010
    bicyclist exits east entrance to twin tunnels
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    The Columbia Gorge Highway was built as both a transportation but also as a recreational road - in 1913 the whole interstate highway system was still many years in the future. Supposedly the cheif engineer on the project said he designed it not to "mar what God had put there."

    As part of this project, quite a number of special scenic tunnels were blasted out of the rock cliffs.

    One of the tunnels had special archways in the side so that people could get a great view out fo the side of the tunnel as they drove through it. Various other tunnels were specially built.

    The last of those tunnels in existence is the "twin tunnels" near Hood River. They suffered a similar fate as their cousin tunnels elsewhere on the road: when interstate 84 was finished, the tunnel was filled with rock to keep people from going inside. Thankfully, it wasn't blasted out of existence like some of the others were.

    In the 1980s there was an effort started to try to create a trail through the Gorge using the abandoned segments of the old Columbia Gorge highway. These tunnels would be part of this plan.

    It wasn't until fairly deep in the 1990s that some actual progress was made in this proposal, and progress was quite slow.

    Today, there is now a Mark O Hatfield Trail between Hood River and Mosier that uses the old highway, and as much as possible restores the highway to the way it once looked in the 1910s and 1920s. The road is mostly closed to vehicles (there are occasional exceptions for special historic auto groups but those are only during very special occasions).

    The tunnels are located at approximately milepost 72 on the trail, or about 5 miles from the parking area.

    The tunnels have been modified somewhat from their original form. They were widened for trucks and other larger vehicles in the years after the highway was built and before the Interstate was built. The process of filling the tunnel with rock, then removing it decades later caused some stability problems here and there on the slope, and so today a huge structure exists to protect those on the trail below from any rocks that may fall from the cliff above the road.

    Also, the tunnels are no longer really "twins", as the rock face was blown up on the west tunnel as part of the 1960s demolition effort, and the two tunnels connected by the protective structure. However, what is here today is as best as possible a restoration of what was left here and still restorable.

    It is still possible to view the Columbia Gorge out the windows that were built into the side of the tunnel. However, the original spectacular walkway that once graced the side of the cliff outside the tunnels is mostly gone. There are a few places where the ornate wall that was once at the edge of the walkway can still be seen, and parts of an old staircase that was part of the walkway is still there as well, though you can only see those remnants of this once great structure at a distance from the end of one of the tunnels.

    Thanks to the windows in the side of the tunnel that were so thoughtfully provided by the designers almost 100 years ago, it is possible to get through the tunnel without a flashlight. However, you will want to bring a flashlight anyway, as there are a few locations were people have carved their names in the wall of the tunnel. Many of these names are modern vandalism, but there are a few historic ones, such as the "Snowbound Nov 19 to 27, 1921" message seen in photo 5. Such messages, while I suppose strictly speaking vandalism, are today more of a part of the historic highway's long and storied history.

    Also, such messages show how much more difficult travel by road was in the 1910s and 1920s than it was today: bring your food and water with you, and hope that some day you will eventually make it through the rough roads and bad weather conditions.

    To get to the tunnels from Hood River, go east on the main two lane road through town. This starts off as State Street, and at a 4-way stop on the east side of Hood River (the river itself - just after the bridge) the road changes name to Old Columbia River Drive. After it weaves up the side of the hill (take a look at Google Maps of that thing!) it becomes somewhat straight and heads east. The road eventualy comes to an end at the trailhead for the Mark O Hatfield Trail or Historic Columbia Gorge Highway Trail, depending on what sign you are reading. You will then to either walk or bike from this point east to the tunnels. If you are only interested in seeing the tunnels and not the Columbia Gorge scenery, then it should be noted that the Twin Tunnels are much closer to the Mosier end of the trail, and you may want to walk or bike in from that end.

    The web site below is the state web site for the state park in which the tunnels sit. It is called "Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail" and is part of the Oregon State Parks system. It is a pay to enter park, and there is a fee pay station at the entrance to the park.

    This is located within a parking fee area state park, so you will have to visit the self-service fee machine as described in my Oregon State Parks tip to pay for your visit, unless you have an Oregon State Parks annual pass.

    Related to:
    • Cycling
    • Historical Travel
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail

    by glabah Updated Dec 8, 2009

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    historic Columbia River Highway Trail, Oct 31,2008
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    You will also find this trail listed as the "Mark O Hatfield State Park" or "Mark O Hatfield State Trail" and variations of that.

    In the 1980s there was a significant effort under way to preserve and restore parts of the historic Columbia River highway that been abandoned and partially destroyed when Interstate 84 was put into operation. Many areas were not too difficult to restore, and other areas were intentionally damaged in order to keep people from going where they shouldn't go.

    The section of the trail between Hood River and Mosier was one section that was difficult to restore, as it required removing a huge amount of material from inside the tunnels that had been put there to keep people out of them. Unfortunately, the material inside the tunnels was obtained by destroying part of the highway.

    You can see photos and read more about the "Twin Tunnels" on my "Twin Tunnels" tip for this area, as they are significant monuments in and of themselves.

    The trail to get to the tunnels is now a state park, and as much as possible the road has been restored to its original state as it was when it was put out of service. This includes the historic (but not up to modern specifications) highway guard rails, some of which are ornate stone walls.

    There are a number of trees growing along the road that obscure the view of the Columbia River gorge, yet there also several spectacular viewpoints that are almost just as good as they were when the road was originally built.

    This is a state park that requires a fee, and there is a pay station at the parking lot at the Hood River end of the trail.

    It is a shorter walk to get to the tunnels from the Mosier End of the trail, and I have put the Mosier end of the trail into a separate tip for the city of Mosier.

    The sun can be brutal in the summer months in this part of the gorge, and the wind will contribute to dehydration. Bring water - you can fill your container at the facilities at the start of the trail if you want.

    The state park ranger station at the Hood River end of the trail is only open during certain hours, so if you have a question be sure to check their hours as when you come back there may not be anyone there.

    The parking lot contains electrical connections for recreational vehicles at special parking spaces.

    All of the photos you see here are from the Hood River to Twin Tunnels section of the trail.

    To get to the trail from Hood River, go east on the main two lane road through town. This starts off as State Street, and at a 4-way stop on the east side of Hood River (the river itself - just after the bridge) the road changes name to Old Columbia River Drive. After it weaves up the side of the hill (take a look at Google Maps of that thing!) it becomes somewhat straight and heads east. The road eventualy comes to an end at the trailhead for the Mark O Hatfield Trail. Beyond there you must either walk or bike, and can go all the way to Mosier.

    The web site below is the state web site for the state park where the trail is located. It is called "Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail" and is part of the Oregon State Parks system. It is a pay to enter park, and there is a fee pay station at the entrance to the park.

    This is a parking fee based state park, so you may have to visit the self-service pay fee machine as described in my Oregon State Parks tip, or if you have the annual pass you don't have to worry about that.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Cycling
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Starvation Creek Falls

    by GuthrieColin Updated May 24, 2007

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    Starvatoin Creek Falls
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    After being underwhelmed by Wah Gwin Gwin Falls i was awestruck by Starvation Creek Falls. This waterfall looks about 2 times as tall as Wah Gwin Gwin Falls but that may be in part because it has awkward viewpoints. The falls themselves are about 186 feet (56 m) but like I said, they feel much taller.
    From the parking area this waterfall is about 3 minutes walk on a paved trail. The waterfall is hidden from the trails end by a large boulder but by stepping over the barrier and finding a path up to the falls where you will be required to cross the creek it will end up right at the base of the falls.
    This view is truly spectacular the two tiers of this waterfall are separated by a large pinnacle shaped rock which sends the lower cascade down in a sheet over the exposed moss covered rock face. With the proximity to a developed trail this waterfall is surprisingly scenic and is one of my favorites in all of Oregon.
    Starvation Creek was named for a unfortunate accident that occurred in the area on December 18, 1884. The Pacific Express train plowed into a snow bank and left 148 people stranded for three weeks while the snow was cleared. Despite the name, Nobody starved during the whole ordeal.

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    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park
    • Water Sports

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    Wah Gwin Gwin Falls

    by GuthrieColin Updated May 24, 2007

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    Wah Gwin Gwin Falls
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    Wah Gwin Gwin Falls claimed to be 207 feet (63 m) but i believe it is much shorter. Unfortunately the views of the waterfall are only from the overlook behind the Historic Columbia River Gorge Hotel. It is a side view which makes it difficult to see the whole falls.
    Aside from the precarious angle i find the falls to be a little disappointing. As a waterfall enthusiast i hate it when a waterfall is diverted for power or developed to the point that it looses scenic beauty and this is certainly the case at this falls. The hotel is built not 40 feet (12 m) from the crest of the falls. It is however a very pretty falls and if a view from the bottom could be reached (train tracks pass by the base) it would be much more interesting to me.
    Possibly the best aspect of the falls is the name itself. Wah Gwin Gwin is a Chinook Indian term meaning "rushing waters". This is much more appropriate than the other name "lullaby falls" given to it likely by hotel patrons.

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    • Spa and Resort
    • Adventure Travel
    • Hiking and Walking

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    FRUIT BLOSSOMS

    by mtncorg Written May 12, 2004

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    Blossoms cover fruit orchards of Hood River Valley

    The Hood River Valley is filled with fruit orchards - apples and pears of many varieties. It is a great place to be in September driving from one fruit stand to another. But if you come in late March, then you can behold the grandeur of a blossom-filled valley with a snow-bedecked Mt Hood rising regally behind. A great place to treat your eyes to the wonders is at the Hood River County Park at Panorama Point, just southeast of Hood River.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Farm Stay
    • Eco-Tourism

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    MT HOOD

    by mtncorg Written May 12, 2004

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    Looking north off the top of Mt Hood

    Tallest peak in Oregon - 11,237 feet, 3,426 m - Mt Hood rises above the south end of the Hood River Valley in dramatic pose. See my Mt Hood pages for more tips. There are hiking, skiing and backpacking opportunities galore. Climbs from the north side tend to be much steeper and longer than those from the south and eastern sides.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Skiing and Boarding

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    MT ADAMS

    by mtncorg Written May 12, 2004

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    Mt Adams and Mazama Glacier; SE side

    This is the 12326 foot volcanic behemoth lying -- miles north of Hood River, framed by the White Salmon River Valley. Mt Adams is not as known as some of the other large Northwestern volcanoes maybe because it is not as visible as the others. Glaciers drape the volcano. North and south sides present 'easy' climbing routes - the south side actually had a mule road to a sulfur mine atop the peak - a large frozen plateau. You can tell what kind of a snowpack the previous winter was by the amount of the old cabin - left over from the mine days - that shows above the snowy ices. West and east routes demand much more in the way of mountain skills covering steep ice and rotten rock.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing

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    BEER

    by mtncorg Written May 12, 2004

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    The joys of Full Sail on a sunny afternoon

    US brewing industry was crushed by the Prohibition of the early 20th Century. The result after the first 50 years following the repeal of Prohibition was an industry centered in Wisconsin and Missouri with a few outliers that brought the country beers known for blandness and lightness - a term thought to denote, inaccurately, diet beer, but really just an accurate description of the taste. Oregonian entrepreneur/beer aficionados had had enough by the 1980's and they managed to change State laws enabling them to ignite the microbrewing phenomenon. Today there are 31 different breweries in Portland alone. One of the original shining stars in the Revolution was Full Sail Brewing Company which set up shop in Hood River with the help of State funds to help with a then still-depressed local economy - 1987. There is a good array of beers brewed here - my favorite is the Mercator Dopplebock which is not always on the list. Over the last 20 years the brewery has grown. The Whitecap Pub, which is directly at the brewery, is still there. There are places to sit inside and out. You can get a few things to eat or just try the beers. A great place to head for after skiing, hiking, windsurfing, kayaking, whitewater rafting, etc..

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining
    • Beer Tasting
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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    MT DEFIANCE

    by mtncorg Written May 12, 2004

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    Looking across towards Mt Defiance from atop Dog M

    You can 'cheat' and drive 4WD roads up Mt Defiance's backside, but most hikers 'earn' Defiance the hard way, beginning on the Columbia River at Starvation Creek State Park. The climb is 4960 feet up to the summit on a trail that takes five miles to get there - the first mile is flat, which means you gain almost 5000 feet in four miles! There are two trails. The Mt Defiance Trail is the shortest way. As I wrote, the first mile is flat and the second is not. Nor are the other three, though it is the second that you will remember. After about two mile, there is a nice viewpoint of the Columbia and Wind Mountain on the Washington side of the Columbia. Look at it well, though, because there is not a lot else to see as you climb through evergreen forests for what seems to be an eternity. The view from the top of Defiance is very nice - Hood River Valley, southern Washington's Cascades, the wild high regions of the Oregon side of the Columbia Gorge and Mt Hood's glorious north face. It is a bit marred by the communication station and the road atop. If you see someone hiking not looking tired, you know that they 'cheated'! The other trail goes up a ridge fatter to the east - it still will gain the 5000 feet! - the forest is a bit taller and more open with several short - very short - flat areas to recoup. You also pass the small Warren Lake. I personally prefer going up this route and going back the Defiance Trail. In springtime, many of the people you will meet on the paths are trying to harden themselves for summer mountains that might lie in their future. If you do Defiance in the summer, you are truly masochistic for there are much better options awaiting you after the summer melts up higher. See: for more opinions on this trail: http://www.localhikes.com/HikeData.asp?DispType=0&ActiveHike=6&GetHikesStateID=1&ID=4384

    Related to:
    • Travel with Pets
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Hiking and Walking

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    DOG MOUNTAIN - nature's floral arrangement

    by mtncorg Written May 12, 2004

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    Balsamroot flowers atop Dog Mt

    Dog Mt sits directly on the Columbia River, rising almost 3000 feet above. The Dog and its smaller companion, Wind Mountain, are very impressive riverside sentinels of the river. Even taller and directly across from the Dog on the Oregon side, is Mt Defiance, almost 5000 feet above the river. From the Washington side of the Columbia next to the Hood River Bridge, you can look downriver at this wondrous part of the Gorge, two glorious giants and one mighty canyon. While hiking up Mt Defiance lies in the realm of the masochist or budding mountaineer - one in the same? - the Dog falls back into a Joe Everyman category, as long as 'Joe' - or 'Mary' - have determination and a modicum of physical fitness. The Dog is a wildly popular place to hike because of its wide-ranging flower gardens covering the summit. At the peak of the floral extravaganza, the display almost seems artificial, so dramatic and vast the sea of yellow balsamroot flowers, interspersed with red Indian paintbrushes, lomatian whites, phlox pinks, delphinium blues and an assortment of others.

    The trail up is fairly steep. You wind first up through dry oak forests - careful of poison oak and the occasional tick. At about 1000 feet up, you enter an evergreen forest at a small and short plateau. Then it is up, up, up. Two branches -old and new - are encountered. The new has a couple of viewpoints and - on weekends - lots of people. The old is slightly steeper with no viewpoints but many fewer people. Both trails merge higher up, still in the forest. A couple more switchbacks and a few hundred feet from the top you emerge into the vast steep meadows of balsamroot. Heaven should look so nice. May is the month you want to visit. I see people climbing the Dog at other times and I ask myself why. There are better options during the heat of the summer. Come in May and behold the beauty.

    Related to:
    • Travel with Pets
    • Photography
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Wygant Trail & Point

    by maverick-mw Updated Mar 23, 2004
    Wygant Trail

    Starting at Mitchell Point, the Wygant Trail leads up and through the side of the gorge reaching Wygant Point after about 3-4 hours, at roughly 1900ft.

    No views to speak of from the top, due to thick trees. The noise of Highway 101 is never entirely gone, so although the wilderness area is great, it is always spoiled by the cars & trucks below.

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    Multnomah Falls

    by Mauzl Written Oct 9, 2003
    Multnomah Falls

    Plummeting 620 feet from its origins on Larch Mountain , Multnomah Falls is the second highest year-round waterfall in the nation. Multnomah Creek is a stream fed by snow melt and rain collected in a series of glacially carved basins. Unusually cold winter months may reduce this flow to a trickle and turn the falls into a masterpiece of sculptured ice.

    Hike the trails…
    …for a closer look at the Falls or for a walk in the woods. Follow the Larch Mountain Trail ¼ mile to the historic Benson arch bridge. From there the top of the Falls is just 1 mile further (this is fairly steep though!). You can return the same way, or loop back to the base of the Falls via Perdition Trail (2.4 miles) or Wahkeena Trail (4 miles). The truly hardy might want to continue on the Larch Mountain Trail to the top (6 miles), where you will be rewarded with a spectacular view of the Cascade Mountains and the Columbia River Gorge.

    Dine in the Lodge…
    …and enjoy fine food with a view of the Falls and a taste of history. In 1915, Simon Benson, a prominent Portland citizen, donated 300 acres of land to the City of Portland. To provide a place of rest & refreshment, the City contracted architect A.E. Doyle to design the impressive stone Lodge in 1925. Ownership if the land & the Lodge turned over to the Forest Service in 1943. The Lodge is currently operated by Multnomah Falls Co. Inc., under special use permit with the Forest Service.
    Open daily for use. Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner.
    Also: Banquet Facilities (seating up to 100) for Weddings, Reunions & Meetings.
    Tour bus dining with reservations.

    Falls Facts
    Multnomah Falls is the highest of many waterfalls seen along the Columbia Gorge. It’s also one of the highest in the nation.

    Ribbon California 1612’
    Upper Yosemite California 1430’
    Middle Cascade California 910’
    Fairy Falls Washington 700’
    Multnomah Oregon 620’
    Wahkeena Oregon 242’
    Horsetail Oregon 176’

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park

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