Jordan Valley Travel Guide

  • Mtncorg at Succor Creek State Park
    Mtncorg at Succor Creek State Park
    by mtncorg
  • Pelota fronton at Jordan Valley
    Pelota fronton at Jordan Valley
    by mtncorg
  • Toffee overlooks camping area in Succor Cr Canyon
    Toffee overlooks camping area in Succor...
    by mtncorg

Jordan Valley Things to Do

  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    by mtncorg Written Sep 13, 2010

    Jean Baptiste Charbonneau was the youngest member of the Lewis & Clark Expedition. He was not only a mere baby at the time, he was the baby son of Sacajewa, the Indian translator whose help eased the expedition's path through the wilds. Jean Baptiste Charbonneau went on to lead a very colorful life ending up dying here at Inskip Station along Jordan Creek on his way from Auburn, California to the mines of Idaho on 16 May 1866. The gravesite is about three miles north of US 95 on a good gravel road to the present-day community of Danner. The old California-Idaho road followed much closer to Jordan creek than does today's highway.

    Mtncorg at the grave of Charbonneay]u Charbonneau is buried with others at Inskip Stn Folk memorials around gravesite; view up valley
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

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  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    by mtncorg Written Sep 13, 2010

    Leslie Gulch is about ten miles south of the Succor Creek park. It lies west on a gravel side road coming off te Succor Creek Road. You rise out of the Succor Creek drainage on washboarded gravel - jarring both you and your rig - and then down into the canyon beyond. Leslie Gulch features ever-rising eroded canyon walls on both sides. Short hikes take off on side canyons. The canyon ends at Owyhee Reservoir. There is a bleak campground here and it is a takeout point for rafters who have been floating the lower section of the Owyhee River - there are three sections in total, each of three to four four float days. The gulch was originally named Dugout Gulch but was renamed after a local rancher was struck and killed by lightning here in 1882. The various geological formations in the canyon date back to ashflows of some 15.5 million years ago. There is lots of wildlife to be seen in the area. I saw at least twenty pronghorn antelope, hawks, deer and a coyote scampering near some range cattle. Bighorn sheep have also been reintroduced into the area.

    Leslie Gulch as you drop in from the east Sign noting the history of the Gulch There is a pronghorn in the middle there!
    Related to:
    • Rafting
    • Photography
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    by mtncorg Written Sep 13, 2010

    Succor Creek Park preserves a beautiful desert canyon on the far eastern edge of Oregon. There is a small primitive campground - mostly Idaho license plates here - that is accessed by a gravel road about ten miles north off OR 201 south of the town of Adrian. Succor Crreek's canyon is a small scale of what awaits river runners of other desert waterways in the area - the Owhyee River in Oregon and the Brunneau River in Idaho. You can also access the park from the south off US 95 just before it turns east into Idaho though now you are talking about 50 miles of gravel road. The road on the north side is better than the south, though neither would be great after or during periods of rainfall - flash floods and mud would be very dangerous. Besides the scenic grandeur of the desert canyon, a big draw here is an abundance of thundereggs to be found around.

    Toffee overlooks camping area in Succor Cr Canyon Early morning shadows in Succor Creek gorge Cliffs rise high above the road at Succor Creek SP Road edging around canyon rocks at Succor Creek
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Photography
    • Archeology

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Jordan Valley Transportation

  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    by mtncorg Written Sep 13, 2010

    This is a gravel road of some 30 miles round about - add another 24 if you do the whole length of the Leslie Gulch sidetrip. Parts of the road are quite good - the southern part leading into the Rockville School where the area around Succor Creek opens up into a bit of a valley oasis. From the northern part of this valley - four miles or so - the road becomes narrow and slow. I think the best way to enjoy the drive is still from the south - no sun in your eyes and a much more dramatic entrance into Succor Creek canyon. Even with the washboard, the scenery is great along the way, just don't look for too much speed

    Gravel road leading north towards Succor Creek SP North from the Leslie Gulch road - note washboard
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park

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Jordan Valley Travel Guide
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