Multnomah Falls Things to Do

  • Benson Bridge
    Benson Bridge
    by fred98115
  • Ponytail Falls
    Ponytail Falls
    by jmpncsu
  • Middle Oneonta Falls
    Middle Oneonta Falls
    by jmpncsu

Most Recent Things to Do in Multnomah Falls

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    Wahkeena Falls

    by jmpncsu Written Feb 10, 2014
    Wahkeena Falls
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    Wahkeena Falls is another beautiful waterfall in the Columbia River Gorge, just a half-mile or so west of Multnomah Falls. Wahkeena is a Yakima Native American word for "most beautiful", a good description of this rather unique waterfall. You can sort of see this waterfall from the road, but to get a good view, take the quarter-mile hike up the paved trail to the nice stone bridge at the base of the falls. The total height of the waterfall is more than 200 feet, but the fall is broken into tiers and its difficult to see the entire thing at once. But that kind of adds to this waterfall's appeal. From the road, you can more less see the entire thing, but its from a distance and partially obscured by foliage. From the stone bridge, you can't see the upper portions of the falls but have good views of the lowest section. This is definitely a worthwhile stop while in the Columbia River Gorge. The waterfall is beautiful and the area is much less crowded than nearby Multnomah Falls. Photographers, in particular, will want to spend a good amount of time getting pictures from different angles.

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    Multnomah Falls

    by jmpncsu Written Feb 7, 2014

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    Multnomah Falls
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    A visit to Oregon is not complete without a stop at Multnomah Falls, Oregon's highest waterfall. It is incorrectly claimed to be the fourth highest in the US and second highest year-round waterfall in the US, but regardless of its rank, Multnomah is truly spectacular. It's right off the Historic Columbia River Highway and I-84 east of Portland, so very easy to visit, and there are touristy amenities available. There is ample parking, a lodge with a restaurant and restrooms, as well as numerous hiking trails to explore the region further. The falls consists of two drop - the upper drop is 542 feet and the lower drop is 69 feet. In between the two is the Benson Bridge that allows a closer view and continues the trail for those wanting to hike to the top. The photography opportunities here are fantastic, but remember a wide-angle lens to capture the entire waterfall. The only downside is that the area is extremely crowded due its ease of access and proximity to Portland. The hiking trails, however, due offer the opportunity to escape the crowds. But crowded or not, this is definitely an attraction that's not to be missed!

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    Ponytail Falls

    by jmpncsu Written Feb 4, 2014

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    Ponytail Falls
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    Ponytail Falls, also called Upper Horsetail Falls, is a smaller waterfall just upstream of the more well-known Horsetail Falls. This waterfall requires a short, but steep hike to visit. From Horsetail Falls along the Historic Columbia River Highway, hike up the Horsetail Falls Trail (438) up a couple of switchbacks and then to the waterfall. The trail runs through a grotto behind the waterfall, so this is a popular place for photographers to take pictures. You can get pictures of it from almost every angle possible. The trail continues on for another half-mile or so and terminates at the intersection with Oneonta Trail at Middle Oneonta Falls, another small but scenic waterfall. The trail is mostly flat at this point, so it's much easier than the first part of the hike. There are also great views of the Columbia River Gorge through breaks in the foliage up here. The bridge here is a little scary and a Forest Service sign indicates that only one person at a time should cross the bridge. I didn't want to test this out and obeyed the warning.

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    Horsetail Falls

    by jmpncsu Written Jan 29, 2014

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    Horsetail Falls
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    Horsetail Falls is a beautiful 200-foot waterfall right along the side of the Historic Columbia River Highway, about 2.5 miles east of Multnomah Falls. Horsetail Creek slides down the cliff face in a classic horsetail form and it doesn't require a hike to get there. There is a parking area along the north side of the highway and a viewing area along the south. You can walk all around the falls to view it from almost 180° and take lots of pictures. Bring a wide-angle lens or you may have trouble getting far away enough to capture the entire thing.

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    Photograph beautiful waterfalls

    by fred98115 Written Sep 13, 2012
    Multnomah Falls
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    Striking thing about Multnomah Waterfalls is the ease of access to the falls and the variety of viewpoints. Pull out the wide-angle and capture all the falls from the viewpoint at the foot of the falls. Walk a paved trail to Benson Bridge and focus in on the Upper Falls. The claim is that these are the second highest waterfall in the USA at 625 feet drop. Photographers: don't forget to include details of the falls as well as the whole shebang. A tripod is useful for long exposures. Trees abound, so light levels may be low.

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    Hike the trails

    by thecatsmeow Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Follow the Larch Mountain trail 1/4 mile to the historic Benson arch bridge. From there, the top of the falls is just one mile further (this is fairly steep, though!). You may want to continue on the Larch Mountain trail to the top (six miles), where a spectacular view of the Cascade Mountains and the Columbia River Gorgeawaits you. Free maps are available at the Visitors center. For the more serious hikers, there are more detailed maps that can be purchased.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    USDA Forest Service, Multnomah Falls Visitor Center

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    Benson Bridge

    by Segolily Written Sep 25, 2009

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    It is a simple and yet beautiful design
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    The Benson Bridge is beautiful. One could wish to see the falls without the bridge intersecting them, however the grace of the design seems instead to create a focal point and adds interest and beauty without detracting from the falls themselves.

    The bridge is named for Simon Benson who paid for it. He was a wealthy Portland lumberman who at one point owned the land the falls were on. Designed by K. P. Bilner and built by the Pacific Bridge co, Italian craftsmen and subcontractor Robert Ringer, in 1914.

    It is a short but steep hike up the mountain to the 45 ft span that overlooks the brink of the lower tier. From the bridge it is 135 feet to the pool at the bottom.

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    Multonomah Falls

    by Segolily Written Sep 25, 2009
    Best viewpoint always has people
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    The falls are actually two-tiered. They are often listed as 620 ft high. This measurement however is a combination of both tiers plus the 9 ft drop in elevation between the tiers. The upper tier falls 542 ft into a large pool, the lower tier falls 69 ft into a small rivulet heading toward the Columbia River. They are spring fed and so have water year round, though fall water flows are lower than spring's.

    The grounds are well manicured and paved for the most part. The best view is filled with visitors each hoping for a picture without anyone else in it.

    There is a steep walk way up to the Benson Bridge. The 45 ft long bridge across the brink of the lower tier was built in 1914 by Simon Benson who owned the land at the time. From the bridge one can view the upper pool and the lower falls plunging down. The path continues up the mountain to other viewpoints and waterfalls.

    There is no charge to visit.

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    Bridal Veil Falls

    by GuthrieColin Updated Apr 1, 2008

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    Bridal Veil Falls
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    Bridal Veil Falls is yet another waterfall that i underestimated. In photo's this waterfall looks interesting but not spectacular. I was wrong this is actually one of the most beautiful in the area and that is saying a lot. Bridal Veil Falls is about 130 feet (39 m) and makes its way down the cliff in two distinct drops.
    Unique to this area, Bridal Veil Falls is on the downhill side of the road. As such the hike will be a downhill out of about .2 miles (300 m) and uphill return. I did notice some nasty plants alongside the trail near the parking area but aside from that and some poorly planned outdoor steps along the trail this waterfall has a lot to offer in sights and sounds.
    On a logistical note, Bridal Veil Falls is the only one in the area which has a bathroom and it even has running water. Their is also a short loop trail with a few viewpoints of the Columbia Gorge.

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    Multnomah Falls

    by cleomedes Written Mar 8, 2008

    Multnomah Falls is the second highest (620 feet, 189 m) year-round waterfall in the United States. A foot trail leads to Benson Footbridge, a 45-foot (14 m)-long footbridge that allows visitors to cross 105 feet (32 m) above the lower cascade.

    There is a nice native american legend about the Multnomah Falls and the Coyote, have a look at:
    http://www.firstpeople.us/FP-Html-Legends/CoyoteandMultnomahFalls-Wasco.html

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    Ponytail Falls

    by PinkFloydActuary Written Nov 22, 2007

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    Ponytail Falls

    Take a moderate hike uphill from the Horsetail falls parking area to get to this pretty waterfall. Along the way, you'll be treated to beautiful views of the Columbia River. The trail itself is less than a half mile, but there are a number of switchbacks. One of the rewards for doing the trail is that you can actually walk behind these falls without getting wet, so you can see them from a number of angles. The falls are about 75 feet high, and shoot off the side of the hill. These falls are also referred to as Upper Horsetail Falls.

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    Watch for wildlife

    by PinkFloydActuary Written Nov 22, 2007

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    Ewww...

    OK - so I didn't see a ton of wildlife in the Gorge, but I almost stepped on this guy. It's a huge banana slug, which roam the areas around the falls. They are mentioned in the visitors center at Multnomah. Just keep your eyes on the ground as you head along the paths near the falls and you might spot one....

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    Latourell Falls

    by PinkFloydActuary Written Nov 22, 2007

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    Latourell Falls

    The first major waterfall you hit as you head east along the scenic drive. The falls are over 200 feet tall, passing over a basalt column wall (like those at Devil's Postpile.) There's also a patch of bright yellow lichen that are on the wall. Again, signs mark the parking area to the waterfalls, and there is a relatively short path to get to the base of the falls. I think the basalt columns do add a real cool touch to these falls, so get out and take a look.

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    Shepperds Dell Falls

    by PinkFloydActuary Written Nov 22, 2007

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    Sheppards Dell Falls

    The second large falls you will see if you take the scenic drive coming from the west. The falls are about 100 feet tall - and it takes the form of a horsetail (like Horsetail Falls) with the "pinch" in the middle of it. Parking is available along the highway, and then a short trail leads to the viewpoints.

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    Bridal Veil Falls

    by PinkFloydActuary Updated Nov 22, 2007

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    Bridal Veil Falls

    Looping back to the western portion of the scenic drive, there are a handful of waterfalls that are easily accessed from the main road. One of these is Bridal Veil - park in the lot, then take a short path down to the vantage points (or short path up to look at it from above.) This waterfall is about 130 feet high or so, and as you can see, has two tiers to it. I love how green the area is - very pretty to look at.

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Multnomah Falls Things to Do

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