Multnomah Falls Things to Do

  • Benson Bridge
    Benson Bridge
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  • Ponytail Falls
    Ponytail Falls
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  • Middle Oneonta Falls
    Middle Oneonta Falls
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Most Recent Things to Do in Multnomah Falls

  • Stephen-KarenConn's Profile Photo

    Vista House at Crown Point

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Sep 7, 2004

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    Vista House is perched atop Crown Point, a 14.5-million-year-old basalt promontory shaped by the same volcanic lava flows, floods and winds that created the Columbia River Gorge. From its vantage point 733 feet above the Columbia River, it offers sightseers and photographers one of Oregon's most inspiring views.

    Construction of Vista House began in 1916, and when we were there in 2004, it was undergoing a $2 million restoration.
    The gray sandstone structure is 44 feet in diameter and 55 feet high. It serves as a rest stop and observatory for travelers on the old Columbia River Gorge Highway, and is a memorial honoring Oregon's pioneers. Vista House has been protected as a state park since 1938, and was designated a National Natural Landmark in 1971.

    Vista House is open daily, 9 a.m. - 6 p.m., mid-April through mid-October.

    Vista House at Crown Point
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    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park

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    Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Sep 7, 2004

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    The Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area encompases 295,000 acres of natural wonderland overlapping six counties on the Oregon/ Washington border, just east of Portland, OR. It is more than just a natural area. The Gorge is also a critical transportation corridor and is home to 52,000 people with farms, communities, businesses, schools, churches and homes.

    The National Scenic Area, the only such area in the nation, was created in 1986 when President Ronald Reagan signed the National Scenic Area Act into law. It is a special area - different from a National Park or National Forest, but under the administration of the USDA Forest Service. The management plan for the Scenic Area calls for continued growth of recreational and other development opportunities while protecting the scenic, cultural and natural resources of the Gorge.

    Karen at the Scenic Area Entrance
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Adventure Travel
    • Eco-Tourism

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    Latourell Falls

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Sep 7, 2004

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    For those coming east from Portland, this is the first waterfall you will see of several in the Columbia River Gorge. In fact, the Gorge contains the largest collection of high falls in the nation. There are a total of 77 falls on the Oregon side alone.

    Latourell Falls is named for Joseph Latourell, a prominent early citizen who donated the falls and the land surrounding it for public enjoyment. The Falls plunges 249 feet from a sheer cliff face on Pepper Mountain, and offers a prime example of entablature jointing. This is a distinctive jointing pattern that is found in the Columbia River basalt flows. Stress, produced when lava cools and contracts caused these joints to form into beautiful prisms and columns.

    Latourell Falls is a very short hike from a parking lot along the highway. A 2.1 mile graded trail will take hikers to the Upper Latourell Falls, which plunges about 100 feet, higher up on the mountainside.

    Karen at Latourell Falls
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    • Adventure Travel
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Road Trip

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    Multnomah Falls

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Sep 7, 2004

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    Multnomah Falls is without doubt one of the most beautiful and most photographed waterfalls in the United States. It plummets 620 feet from its origins on Larch Mountain into the Columbia River Gorge, making it the fifth highest waterfall in the nation, and America's second highest year-round waterfall. With 2 million visitors a year, it is Oregon's top tourist destination.

    Legend has it that sickness once threatened the Multnomah Indian Tribe and the chief's daughter appeased the Great Spirit in behalf of her people by throwing herself off the face of the Falls. Some visitors say that her face may still be seen in the mist.

    A winding trail takes hikers 1/4 mile to the Benson Bridge which disects the upper and lower portions of the falls. The upper falls drops over a moss covered rock cliff a breathtaking 542 feet, then gathers into a small pool before flowing under the bridge and plunging another 70 feet. Beyond the bridge, more energetic hikers may follow the trail for another mile to the top of the falls, with views of the beautiful Columbia River Gorge.

    Multnomah Falls
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    • Hiking and Walking

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  • mcpangie's Profile Photo

    Multnomah Falls

    by mcpangie Written Jan 25, 2004

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    Wether you take a quick stop to view them, or hike around and get some close-up views, Multnomah Falls is a must-see in Oregon.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

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Multnomah Falls Things to Do

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