Water Front Park, Portland

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Waterfront Park

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  • Playing in Salmon Springs Street fountain
    Playing in Salmon Springs Street...
    by Rixie
  • nice views
    nice views
    by machomikemd
  • Water Front Park
    by seoulgirl
  • xeberus's Profile Photo

    Walk & Roll

    by xeberus Updated Apr 4, 2011
    View from Hawthorne Bridge

    So Portland moved a freeway to build a park! How many cities can say that? This park is emensely popular with pedestrians, cyclists and skaters. You'll see business people taking lunch strolls and homeless people watching the world go by (they tend to be harmless and placid). In the spring the pink blossoms on the cherry trees are beautiful! From May through to the fall the park hosts events including Cinco de Mayo fair, a beer festival, gay/lesbian pride, the Rose Festival, and the Blues Festival. Many people miss the sublime Japanese American Historical Plaza on the north end of the park. On the south end by the marina you'll find a bustling little shopping and dining zone. If walking the 22 block length of the park isnt' enough, you can cross over either the Hawthorne Bridge or the lower level of the Steel Bridge and walk along the East Bank Esplanade.

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    GOVERNOR TOM MCCALL WATERFRONT PARK

    by mtncorg Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Cherry trees and benches in Waterfront Park

    Sometimes urban renewal works, sometimes it doesn't. Here, the long held dreams of reuniting the City with the Willamette River have come to a very successful fruition. In the 1920's a seawall was built along the river's west bank to provide flood protection for the downtown area. Along the riverfront a large Market Building used to dominate the scene. The market failed over time and the building became home to one of the City's two newspapers (that paper has since been sold and incorporated into the one and only Oregonian). A long the seawall, used to run Harbor Drive, a very busy street. Harbor Drive was not as important a street after the State Transportation Department installed the Eastbank Freeway. So, in 1974, Harbor Drive was torn up, the Journal Building was demolished and the area between Front and Harbor became the 37-acre Waterfront Park, renamed after the popular governor who put the forces in place.

    The Park is a vast public open space that serves as a center for many festivals - including the Rose Festival - in the warmer months. A huge sewer project is underway at present at two ends of the Park - ongoing till 2006. Upon completion some changes are in store for the Park that serves as Portland's living room. Walkers, joggers, bicyclists all enjoy the vast promenade above the River along the sea wall. Up close views of many of Portland's bridges are afforded. At the north end of the Park is the Japanese-American Memorial - in memory of those Japanese-Americans who were interred during WWII. At the south end of the Park, is another product of urban change, the RiverPlace district. Walking the Westbank Promenade, you can link over to the Eastbank Esplanade via the Hawthorne and Steel Bridges and make a pleasant three-mile walk.

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    JAPANESE AMERICAN HISTORICAL PLAZA

    by mtncorg Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Stones record emotional  thoughts of times past

    Dedicated in 1990 to the memory of all Japanese Americans who suffered inland internment during WWII because of fears that these people would help potential invading Japanese forces. The garden and artwork is at the north end of Waterfront Park next to the west end of the Steel Bridge. See my TL for more on this unique Park.

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    CHERRY TREES

    by mtncorg Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Steel Bridge rises above Japanese cherry trees

    Over one hundred ornamental cherry trees surround the Japanese American Historical Plaza giving a wonderful impression in early spring or mid fall. One of Portland’s longtime Sister Cities is Sapporo, Japan. There is a strong link between both America and Japan here in Portland – a link commemorated here.

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    MORRISON BRIDGE

    by mtncorg Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Minimalist towers and huge bridge fenders

    Replacing two earlier bridges, the Morrison was completed in 1958 with minimalist architecture in mind. The bridge is a very busy conduit into the central city - some 50000 vehicles a day. Like the Burnside Bridge, the Morrison is a double-leaf bascule draw span - opening about 30 times a month on average. It makes an interesting counterpoint to its neighbor - the Burnside - to the north.

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    BURNSIDE BRIDGE

    by mtncorg Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Italinate towers of the Burnside Bridge

    The older of the two inner city double-leaf bascule drawspans, the Burnside Bridge was built in 1926 replacing an older 1896 structure. One of the designers involved was Joseph Strauss, better known as the bridge designer for San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge. The Burnside Bridge is the only bridge designed with the help of an architect, which maybe explain the Italian Renaissance-inspired bridge towers. Busy Burnside Street crosses the bridge serving to separate the City on a north - south axis. Streets to the north are either northwest or southwest (or north in one smaller region of the City) and to the south are either southwest or southeast - the Willamette River serving as the east-west axis.

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    HAWTHORNE BRIDGE

    by mtncorg Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Hawthorne Bridge into downtown

    Owned by Multnomah County - as are six of Portland’s other Bridges - this is the City's oldest, dating back to 1910. The bridge features a 244-foot steel through truss vertical lift span, which can lift 110 feet. The Hawthorne Bridge has undergone several major modifications during its lifetime, the most recent during 1999. The bridge serves the heart of the central business district and provides a dramatic foreground to the city towers beyond, when viewed from the eastbank. The bridge is also one of the lower bridges, which means that the lift operation gets to be operated on a more frequent basis.

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    SEAWALL

    by mtncorg Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Pigeons rest along the top of the seawall

    Wander along the riverside boundary of Waterfront Park and you walk along the edge of a seawall built in the 1920’s to provide flood protection to the central business district. For the one and only time since the seawall was erected, in 1996, a huge plywood/sandbag wall was erected atop the seawall, during the height of a huge flood that threatened to top the wall.

    The seawall is also the home of the huge Rose Festival fleet, a centerpiece for the Rose Festival week. A literal fleet of American and Canadian vessels berthed along the wall. Post 9/11 fears of terrorism and sabotage have severely diminished the numbers of vessels visiting in early June. The huge black bollards along the wall belie the docking opportunities still presented by the Rose City.

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  • Shaft28's Profile Photo

    Cinco de Mayo in Portland

    by Shaft28 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    woo-hoo!  party on the waterfront!

    In another excuse for Portlander's to get out when the sun might be out is the waterfront Cinco de Mayo festival.
    For five days, thats right F-I-V-E, the waterfront park is transformed into a open festival with parades and food to celebrate the Latino community.
    I find the length of the celebration a little funny coming from San Jose where the Hispanic population is hundred of thousands with a one day festival - and a much, much smaller community is in Oregon.
    But, so be it for an Oregonian to pass up a chance to lift a pint during the nice season. Well, may be the nice season that early...
    May 1-5th, coronas on the waterfron t on me!

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  • WulfstanTraveller's Profile Photo

    Tom McCall Waterfront Park

    by WulfstanTraveller Written Oct 24, 2010
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    Portland has a nice park along the waterfront of the Willamette River downtown. It is right along the Old Town shore of the river, once a busy commercial area and a heart of the city's early economic activity.

    There is plenty of grass for kids to run in, or to relax, plus walking and bicycle paths, sculptures, etc.

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  • Rixie's Profile Photo

    A Park by the River

    by Rixie Updated Apr 27, 2009

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    Skater and picnickers in Waterfront Park
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    The Tom McCall Waterfront Park, named after a former Oregon governor, borders the west side of the Willamette River. It's a great place to walk, bicycle, people watch, or just hang out on the grass.

    Several Portland festivals, like the Blues Festival, are held in the park, and it's a popular place for families on weekends.

    The day we were there, some young artists were making chalk drawings on the pavement.

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  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    in A Clean River

    by machomikemd Updated Oct 1, 2008

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    nice views

    Portland is famous because of the Rose Festival and it is commemorated here at the Watefront Park. This is like what venice beach is to los angeles so the center of festivals, event, parties, etc in the portland area is here. there are also restaurants, bars and shopping areas in it so you can enjoy the atmosphere.

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  • seoulgirl's Profile Photo

    Beer Festival At Waterfront Park

    by seoulgirl Updated Jun 18, 2008

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    Volunteers pour the beer
    1 more image

    Every year the biggest Microbrew festival takes place in Portland at the Waterfront Park. Breweries from all over the country bring their beer for you to sample. There are dozens. You can get Ginger beer from Hawaii to Cherry Stout from Virginia. Many brew pubs from Portland are also there, of course.

    In my pictures there is a program of all the breweries that attended in 2007.

    My advice is to go early and go on the first or second day. At night it gets very very crowded and rowdy. Plus they run out of beers. If you are serius about beer tasting, go early.

    There are plenty of food booths also with seating, there is seating under the tents where the beer is also.

    It's usually 2 cans of food for the food bank to enter

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  • jaskak's Profile Photo

    The World's Smallest Park!

    by jaskak Written May 2, 2008
    The entire park (I'm not kidding)
    1 more image

    See the second photo for the full and official story. According to Guinness, Mills Run Park is the world's smallest, located not too far from the river in Portland. I happened across it as I was leaving one of the amazing Saturday markets on my way to OMSI (the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry) to see the BodyWorld exhibit. The park's decorations have changed throughout the years, and various figurines and plants have come and gone. I wouldn't say it's the most exciting thing to see, but for those interested in world-record superlatives, it's another one to add to the list.

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  • glabah's Profile Photo

    Waterfront Park: summer festivals, sometimes quiet

    by glabah Updated Jan 31, 2008

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    Waterfront Park on a quiet, sunny Friday afternoon
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    Waterfront Park itself (officially named Governor Tom McCall Waterfront Park) is a strip of land that was once occupied by Harbor Drive and industrial and port related facilities.

    By 1968 Harbor Drive was less important to the transportation in the city, and a study initiated by Tom McCall resulted in the eventual completion, in 1978, of a park along the waterfront that had originally been proposed in 1903. It is fitting that the official name of the park would include the name of the man who initiated its construction.

    The park contains a number of memorials, among them the Battleship Oregon memorial, memorials to the Japanese residing in the USA that were held prisoner during World War II, a fountain, the Friendship Circle, the founders stone, and a number of smaller plaques including a note of thanks to the Canadians who housed USA citizens during the Iranian embassy crisis in 1979.

    In the warm months, the park is a frequent location of all manner of celebrations, including Cinco de Mayo, the Portland bite, a beer festival, and the Rose Festival Fun Center and Rose Festival Fleet.

    Much of the park is a grass corridor, and during quiet days you can find a number of Portland residents relaxing or exercising here. During a clear day, you can see Mt. Hood.

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