Starvation Creek State Park Travel Guide

  • Harrison Falls
    Harrison Falls
    by GuthrieColin
  • Camp Benson Falls
    Camp Benson Falls
    by GuthrieColin
  • Camp Benson Falls
    Camp Benson Falls
    by GuthrieColin

Starvation Creek State Park Things to Do

  • GuthrieColin's Profile Photo
    Starvatoin Creek Falls 4 more images

    by GuthrieColin Written Jun 2, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    After being underwhelmed by Wah Gwin Gwin Falls i was awestruck by Starvation Creek Falls. This waterfall looks about 2 times as tall as Wah Gwin Gwin Falls but that may be in part because it has awkward viewpoints. The falls themselves are about 186 feet (56 m) but like I said, they feel much taller.
    From the parking area this waterfall is about 3 minutes walk on a paved trail. The waterfall is hidden from the trails end by a large boulder but by stepping over the barrier and finding a path up to the falls where you will be required to cross the creek it will end up right at the base of the falls.
    This view is truly spectacular the two tiers of this waterfall are separated by a large pinnacle shaped rock which sends the lower cascade down in a sheet over the exposed moss covered rock face. With the proximity to a developed trail this waterfall is surprisingly scenic and is one of my favorites in all of Oregon.
    Starvation Creek was named for a unfortunate accident that occurred in the area on December 18, 1884. The Pacific Express train plowed into a snow bank and left 148 people stranded for three weeks while the snow was cleared. Despite the name, Nobody starved during the whole ordeal.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Historical Travel

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Starvation Creek State Park Off The Beaten Path

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    Camp Benson Falls 3 more images

    by GuthrieColin Written Jan 16, 2010

    Camp Benson Falls, although much smaller than the ones found at Starvation Creek State Park are without a doubt one of my favorites in the Columbia Gorge. I may have just arrived there on a very good overcast day but I was completely taken by the gorge and these falls.
    The Falls are about 90 feet (27 m) and descend into a very well protected canyon. This is a fall that without previous knowledge you would most certainly never come across. It is also the site of my first and only encounter with a nasty plant.
    Not sure if it was poison ivy or oak or sumac since I didn’t notice the culprit but I was regretting wearing shorts for the next month or so as the rash healed. Rash and difficulty considered I would certainly look forward to another visit to this falls It was simply too charming to pass up.

    Directions:
    From I-84 about 2.5 miles from the Wyeth exit an unmarked dirt driveway travels about 80 feet up into the hill before being cut off by a gate. From there you must follow the road for about 6/10th of a mile until you are in a clearing and the road cuts once again into the trees. From there find the edge of the canyon and carefully make your way down.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Harrison Falls 1 more image

    by GuthrieColin Written Jan 16, 2010

    Having made two trips to do nothing but seek out waterfalls in the Columbia Gorge I have sworn that a small waterfall existed just off the road on Lindsey Creek. It is only a glancing image from the highway but in fact I was correct and later found out that it had a name as well.
    Harrison Falls is certainly not a waterfall for everyone. In fact I’m not sure who I would recommend this waterfall to. It is smaller than the ones nearby and more difficult to find. Nevertheless it was found so I will write about it.
    The falls themselves are about 45 feet (14 m) but that is covered in multiple steps. It is a fairly scenic location if you can ignore the sound of the highway just a few hundred feet behind you.

    Directions:
    I’m not going to pretend that I can explain where these falls are. As you are headed eastbound on I-84 Lindsey creek passes beneath the road and there is a small turnout just after the bridge. This is located less than a mile from the Starvation Creek turnout.

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    • Hiking and Walking
    • Road Trip

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    Lancaster Falls 4 more images

    by GuthrieColin Written May 25, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I have not seen any other pictures from the base of the upper falls and for good reason. It was pretty difficult getting there. After hiking .8 miles (1.2 km) following trail #413 at all junctions, I had to basically scratch my way up the adjacent hillside to a point where I could get this view. Their were other footprints but I still haven't seen other pictures.
    The falls are sited at nearly 300 feet (91 m) with an upper portion falling about 230 feet (70 m). I don't believe the upper portion is that tall having been there but it is likely around 170 feet (51 m) or more followed by some steep cascades to the lower portion.
    This waterfall is especially scenic in its location since a view of the Columbia Gorge can be found. This view is probably why from I-84 Lancaster Falls is the only waterfall visible in the area. The falls were named after Samuel C. Lancaster who was the designer of the original Columbia Gorge Highway.

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

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