Yachats Things to Do

  • Devils Churn
    Devils Churn
    by dustmon
  • SEE THE POWER!!!!!
    SEE THE POWER!!!!!
    by dustmon
  • Cape Perpetua Scenic Area
    Cape Perpetua Scenic Area
    by dustmon

Best Rated Things to Do in Yachats

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    DEVIL'S STILL CHURNING

    by mtncorg Written Oct 27, 2004

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    The path opens onto the basaltic rocks making up the Churn. You can scamper as close to the edge as you dare. With a modicum of caution, you can watch the frothing waters and crashing waves. Be very careful of sneaker waves, which can rise up out of nowhere.

    Boiling waters foaming inside of Devil's Churn
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    STRAWBERRY HILL

    by mtncorg Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    About two miles south of Cape Perpetua is the Strawberry Hill State Wayside. There is a little parking lot from which you can gain access to some grand tide pools. On the rocks just offshore, you can also watch a herd of harbor seals that call this home. The 20-mile stretch of coastline running from Cape Perpetua to Sea Lion Cape is among the wildest there is, though even here, houses have a way of springing up.

    Harbor seals on the rocks at Strawberry Hill
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    • Photography
    • Whale Watching

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    DEVIL'S CHURN

    by mtncorg Written Oct 27, 2004

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    Located below a newly constructed Forest Service center along US 101, just south of the Cape Perpetua Visitors Center, Devil's Churn is a long fissure carved by the action of sea waves into the basaltic rocks. A path, switchbacks down to the chasm from the parking lot above. The parking lot requires a $5 daily forest parking permit/or an annual $30 Northwest Forest Pass or one of the Pacific Coast Passports (see the tip on Cape Perpetua below for more). Waves constantly splash within the Churn creating a creamy mix of sea foam.

    Jumbled waves at the Devil's Churn
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    CAPE PERPETUA

    by mtncorg Written Oct 27, 2004

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    Captain Cook spotted this 803-foot high headland on March 7, 1778 - St Perpetua's Day. The view from the top is one of the most dramatic to be found along the Coast with views of up to 40 miles out to sea and almost 100 miles south -Coos Bay - to north - Cape Foulweather. You can either take a trail to the top or drive up a side road off of US 101 for two miles. At the top, a short quarter mile loop trail offers the views. The Civilian Conservation Corps built the trail and a small rock-built hut -used by the Coast Guard in WWII - in 1933. There are several other trails in the area - 23 miles worth - as well as a Visitor Center just off US 101, which is open from May to October and during the peak whale-watching weeks - Christmas-New Year's and late March.

    Cape Perpetua is within the Siuslaw National Forest and trailhead parking requires either a $5 day parking pass, an annual $30 Northwest Forest Pass or a special Pacific Coast Passport - $35 for an annual version and $10 for a Five-Day Passport. The Passport was developed because along the Coast there are many different agencies responsible for managing the different sites - National Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, Oregon State Park Service. With a Passport, you don't have to buy a parking pass from each different agency, though you can do that, as well;-] You can buy the Passport from most of the Visitor Centers or manned ticket entries along the Coast.

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    • Whale Watching
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    TENMILE CREEK BRIDGE

    by mtncorg Written Oct 27, 2004

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    This bridge is identical to two other bridges McCullough designed - at Tillamook over the Wilson River and a few miles south of Fifteenmile Creek, at Big Creek. All three bridges feature a 120-foot reinforced concrete through tied arch of elliptical shape - also known as a bowtied arch. These were the first concrete tied-arch spans constructed in America. Tied arches were used in locations where the costs of producing the huge foundations needed for sustaining the thrust of conventional arch spans was prohibitive.
    Built in 1931 along a very desolate section of the central Coast, this bridge has long melded into the natural beauty of the area only now being marred with the steady development of ostentatious vacation/retirement homes.

    Fifteenmile Creek Bridge
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    The rustic little building at...

    by falicia2000 Written Feb 25, 2003

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    The rustic little building at the corner of Third and Pontiac Streets in Yachats has been a part of this coastal community for generations.

    Built in the shape of a cross from local timber hauled down the Yachats River, the Little Log Church was completed and dedicated in 1930. It was served by ministers from the Oregon Conference of the Evangelical Church, and later by pastors from the Presbyterian Church. When the congregation grew too large for the little building, members built a new church a few blocks away, and the Little Log Church and property was sold to the Oregon Historical Society on the condition it be maintained as a museum. The site was deeded to the city of Yachats in 1986.

    The building underwent a complete restoration in 1993, made possible by enthusiastic community support and the loving hands of volunteer workers.

    Today the Little Log Church Museum houses a rich treasure of local historical artifacts as well as contemporary works on loan as exhibits. It is still regularly used for weddings, memorials, and special events in addition to fine arts exhibits.

    Related to:
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    Cape Perpetua Scenic area

    by gezbelle Written Apr 22, 2008

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    Although a little touristy, the Cape Perpetua Scenic area is a must go destination in Yachats and is just situated just south of the town.

    Enjoy the beautiful views of the coastline. Wander down the many scenic paths and hike trails. Learn about the construction of the West Shelter observation point in 1933. Maybe even catch sight of a whale.

    View from Cape Perpetua of the Pacific Ocean

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    Heceta Head Lighthouse

    by goingsolo Updated Mar 4, 2005

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    The Heceta Head Lighthouse is an impressive sight. Even more impressive are the brilliant flashes of light which emanate from the lighthouse every ten seconds. There is a one million candle power beacon which can be seen as far as 21 miles out to sea. In this area, where fog is nearly everpresent, a strong beacon of light is a necessity.

    Heceta Head's light first shone in March of 1894, 205 feet above sea level and visible for over 21 miles. One thousand barrels of blasting powder were required to create a flat table on the rocky cliffs. Heceta remained an extremely isolated outpost until the 1930's when road crews arrived with their families and tents to construct Route 101, the Pacific Coast Highway.

    The area is named for Captain Don Bruno de Heceta of the Spanish Royal Navy, an explorer whose expedition passed along the Oregon coast around 1775.

    Yachats
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    Cape Perpetua

    by goingsolo Written Mar 4, 2005

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    There is a short trail which becomes pretty steep as it climbs to a view of the Cape. The first part is paved and descends through a forest which is cool, damp and tranquil. The visitor's center explains a bit about the history of the area as well.

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    Sea Lion Cave

    by goingsolo Updated Mar 4, 2005

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    The sea lion cave is worth a stop and worth the price of admission. It is about 15 miles south of Yachats. There is a steep path which leads to a lookout area where you can see the cave and the sea lions. The cave itself is pretty impressive. Discovered in 1880 by William Cox, this cave is 12- stories high and is the largest sea cave in the world. Sea lions gather in this natural amphitheater, usually during fall and winter. In spring and summer, they breed and have their young on rock ledges just outside the cave.

    A recent U.S. Fish and Wildlife Survey indicates a possible total population of nearly 80,000 Steller sea lions. The number of Steller sea lions in the Sea Lion Caves area varies from season to season and from year to year with the herd averaging about 200 animals.

    I don't know if there were 200 sea lions hanging around, but there were a good number of them. They're pretty hard to spot as they blend in with the floor of the cave.

    Yachats
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    Devil's Churn

    by dustmon Written May 14, 2012

    This is a pretty stop on #101 where there is a sluice in the rocks so that in high storms and really rough weather the water comes rushing up the sluice and shoots up in the air---we went when it was not so magnanimous but still a pretty view.

    Devils Churn SEE THE POWER!!!!! Cape Perpetua Scenic Area
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    NORTH FORK YACHATS BRIDGE

    by mtncorg Written Aug 31, 2010

    The isolation of this covered bridge – actually the next one, as well – is similar to what you find further south at the Deadwood Creek bridge. Built in 1938 for only $1500 and at 42 feet long it is one of the shortest covered bridges in the State. So short that instead of the more normal Howe truss, you will find the more simple Queenpost truss structure. Locals know where the bridge is but you will need to use the directions for no sign will guide you. This is just your everyday normal local bridge not trying to bring attention to it. That said, I think enough people find their way out here judging from the number of “No Trespassing” signs posted around the bridge. The bridge was rehabilitated last in 1989 – new roof, siding, trusses and approaches. Nestled deep in the wooded canyon of the North Fork of the Yachats, it is a gorgeous spot to reflect. The North Fork road dead ends on the other side of the bridge.

    Mtncorg at the North Fork Yachats Bridge Interior of the bridge - dead end ahead The bridge house from upstream Up from the river bed into the bridge above

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    FISHER SCHOOL BRIDGE

    by mtncorg Written Aug 31, 2010

    Much like the Deadwood Creek span, this bridge is hidden deep within the mountains of the Coast Range. It is not that hard to find – just head off OR 34 onto Five Rivers Road for nine twisty, but paved miles. Built in 1927 for $1800 – or 1919 for $2500 depending upon which record is more accurate – the bridge was slated for removal after a concrete span was completed but a few feet away in the 1970’s. Locals saved the bridge and it was renovated so traffic could once more cross – it had been open to only pedestrian traffic before. The name comes from the nearby Fisher School which you can see on the other side of the concrete bridge – much quieter today than in the past.

    Mtncorg at the Fisher School Bridge Commemorative memorial for rebuilt bridge Fisher School Bridge spanning Five Rivers
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    Cape Perpetua

    by sunnywong Written Dec 14, 2003

    Located at 800' elevation, is the highest point on the Oregon Coast which offers “the best view on the Oregon Coast.”

    Sites to see in the area include: Devil’s Churn, Devil’s Churn Viewpoint, Visitor Center, Cook’s Chasm.

    Visitors can drive two miles past the visitor center to the viewpoint. On a clear day, you can see a panoramic view of 150 miles of the Oregon coast. There is a short loop trail around the cape summit, which leads back to the visitor center.

    Cape Perpetua
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    • National/State Park

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    Heceta Head Lighthouse and B&B

    by dustmon Written May 14, 2012

    A lovely lighthouse with the keeper's house turned into a B&B---there is a park where you can take photos and also walk up to the LH itself----both circa 1894
    The B&B serves a 7 course breakfast!

    entrance The B&B Keepers House Lighthouse and B&B Bridge over Parking lot
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    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park

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Yachats Things to Do

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