Fun things to do in Gettysburg

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    by Ewingjr98
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Most Viewed Things to Do in Gettysburg

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Gettys Crossroads and Tavern Historical Marker

    by Yaqui Updated May 31, 2011

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    Here the Shippenburg-Baltimore and the Philadelphia-Pittsburg Roads crossed. Near the crossroad, stood the tavern of Sameul Gettys. In 1775, troops gathered here for Continental service.

    Visitor Center
    Open Wednesday - Monday 9 AM - 5 PM

    or

    Gettysburg National Military Park Visitor Center
    1195 Baltimore Pike, Gettysburg
    8:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    Administrative Office:
    571 West Middle Street, Gettysburg
    Monday - Friday 8:30 AM - 5:00 PMl

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    Soldiers Museum

    by Yaqui Updated May 31, 2011

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    Another wonderful museums that gets overlook due to the famous Gettysburg Battlegrouds. Looks like it has lots of wonderful Civil War exhibits.

    This building was used by General Howard as his headquarters. In 1866, it was turned into an orphanage that survived until 1877. It was known as “The National Soldier’s Orphan Homestead” and at one time housed 130 boys and girls. Lots of terrible things happened to these poor children when it was an orphanage.

    2011 Prices

    Adults - $7.50
    Children (ages 6-12) - $3.50

    5 and under free
    March & April Open 9 AM - 5 PM.

    Hours: Summer 9am - 7pm. Spring and Fall 9am - 5pm. Parking including buses adjacent to museum.

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  • Wanderer001's Profile Photo

    New Cyclorama

    by Wanderer001 Updated Apr 28, 2011

    While this is part of the visitors center and museum I did not want to just lump this in as part of my other tip because it deserved its own.

    On my trip here in 2009 I skipped this because it was busy and I did not want to pay to just see a painting no matter how "round" it was. I would like to say that on my trip here in 2011 I did go and see it and was happy I did. The cyclorama is so much more then just a "round" painting. You get a movie before hand, then you go up to the room where the cyclorama is. At first I thought the room was way too dimly lit for anyone to really see the painting well. Come to find out it's because the program starts you off at the dawn of battle. Which can be seen in my pictures. As well as the simulated cannon fire and smoke. It is very hard to describe. All I can say is go see for yourself. It is well worth the money and if you see my visitors center tip there is a place to get $1 off a ticket.

    Fun fact: Without knowing it I took a picture of the artist because he painted himself into the picture. I was trying to show how there are 3D things that merge seamlessly into the painting to draw you in.

    Cannon fire Dawn approaches Artist under tree battle scene
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  • Wanderer001's Profile Photo

    New Visitors center and museum

    by Wanderer001 Updated Apr 28, 2011

    This new visitor center is much like the old one and at the same time not. Aside from being brand new and bigger then the old one the new visitor center houses a museum and the cyclorama.

    You can view a small sampling of the museum and get to the gift shop without having to pay. However, if you want access to the full museum and see cyclorama you will have to buy a ticket. If you go here you can find a coupon for $1 off an adult ticket. The coupon is good until 7/26/2011 for now. The price for a adult ticket is $10.50. Going early on a weekend is a good idea, or try for during the week for slightly less crowds.

    The museum is very nice and has a great deal of items and things to look through. The lighting is kept dim so taking pictures will be difficult because there is a strict no flash rule. If you are going to spend time on only one thing in the museum I would suggest the database of all the monuments that are in Gettysburg. It breaks them down into states, union/confederate, type of material, etc. I stayed here for quit some time looking over things I might not have seen before or was looking for.

    Cannon Civil war Medal of Honor Fused bullets 34 star USA flag 1861 Wall of amo
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  • Wanderer001's Profile Photo

    The First Shot(s) of the Battle of Gettysburg

    by Wanderer001 Updated Apr 28, 2011

    As with many battles there is a certain amount of pride for soldiers when it comes to the fist shot of battle and with Gettysburg it was no different. As such the location as well as who made the first shot is highly contested. However, it would seem that history as well as the museum in the visitors center gives this honor to Lieutenant Marcellus Jones of the 8th Illinois Cavalry.

    The "first shot" monument I have depicted first is the one that was erected by Marcellus Jones him self. It is a little hard to find if you are not paying attention and there is no parking at all to get out of your car and view it up close. I have a good zoom on my camera and that's how I got my close up.

    The second monument 9th New York Cavalry, depicted second, also claims to have the first shot.

    There is also an interesting article on the subject if you will like to learn more about it.

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  • Wanderer001's Profile Photo

    Triangular Field

    by Wanderer001 Updated Apr 17, 2011

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    Easily over looked for its part in the rebel attack on Little round top this was the site of much blood shed. On the afternoon of July 2 1863 General James Longstreet’s Confederate troops began an assault that took them down Seminary Ridge towards Little Round Top. As the men from Texas and Arkansas crossed the Triangular Field, they were open targets. Three more times that day, Confederate troops would attempt crossing this field, only to be gunned down by the Union troops on top of Little Round Top. Even with heavy suppression fire by the 124 NY infantry the confederates were able to use the stone wall by the gate for cover and eventually were able to take the ridge leading into Devils den.

    Perhaps this site today is better know for being supposedly the most haunted place in Gettysburg. People are said to hear voices, smell sulfur, see people peering around rocks, and even have their cameras malfunction.

    Gate to Triangular Field Triangular Field Down in Trinagular Field Path leading down into Trinagular Field 124 NY infantry
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  • Wanderer001's Profile Photo

    New York infantry Irish brigade monument

    by Wanderer001 Updated Apr 14, 2011

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    One of the more unique monuments in my opinion the New York infantry Irish brigade monument is pretty well known and some what difficult to locate if you are not paying attention. Dedicated to the 63, 69, 88 New York infantry regiments. Made of green granite topped by a Celtic cross with a life size likeness of an Irish Wolfhound, the traditional Irish symbol of loyalty.

    Irish brigade monument Close up of life size Irish wolfhound 3 Pennies clover shape & NY state quarter in back
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  • Wanderer001's Profile Photo

    Trostle Barn

    by Wanderer001 Updated Apr 14, 2011

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    Maj. Gen. Daniel E. Sickle established his headquarters along side the Trostle barn which still shows the scars of battle in a cannonball hole on the gable of the barn.

    Also located here is a monument to Sickle indicating where he was injured by a cannonball that caused his leg to be amputated.

    Side of barn with cannon hole Broad side of Trostle barn Maj. Gen. Daniel E. Sickles wounded 7/2/1868 Located in musume/visitor center
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    The Civil War Chapel

    by VeronicaG Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    We happened upon the Civil War Chapel minutes before leaving Gettysburg one Sunday morning. As we dashed into a little coffee shop, we saw a small group gathered next door for a 10am service.

    It was the preaching and costumed individuals that caught our attention. Unfortunately, this was 'bike week' so it was somewhat difficult to hear what was said as the vehicles roared by. I loved the whole idea of this chapel and thought it similar to the Cowboy Chapels found around Texas.

    A Civil War Museum at 242 Baltimore Street is sponsored by the same organization, but we did not have the opportunity to wander through it this visit. The hours are Thurs.,Fri. and Sat. from 12n-5pm.

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    The Rupp House History Center

    by Wanderer001 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Rupp House History Center allows visitors to look back and see what daily life was like back during the battle. It has many interactive exhibits that visitors are encouraged to touch. Just try and pick up with one hand the period rifle loaded down with all the equipment that a soldier had to carry on him. Also on display in the home is the Rupp family bible which was pretty interesting to see. And the best thing about the Rupp House History Center is that it is FREE, unless you want to make a donation to the friends of the national parks at Gettysburg.

    Like all residents of Gettysburg, the Rupps were caught up in the maelstrom of the battle. John Rupp's house and business were important sites in the attack and defense of Cemetery Hill. Caroline Rupp and her children were forced to flee across enemy lines to get away from the fighting. However John Rupp was not so lucky, he spent three days of the battle hidden in his basment as Union troops that occupied the front porch fired at Confederate troops that were holding up on the back porch. His tannery was used as a fort by Confederate sharpshooters targeting Union troops on Cemetery Hill, located less than half a mile away.

    The present Rupp House structure a house in the Gothic Revival "cottage style" was erected in 1868 by John Rupp as a replacement for his home that was damaged during the battle of Gettysburg. The present house is built on the footprint of the original house, and many of the materials from the original structure were salvaged and used in the construction of the present home.

    Open weekends;
    Saturday 11 a.m. - 7 p.m.
    Sunday 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.

    Rupp House Period rifle loaded with all a soldier's equipment Rupp family Bible Rupp house cellar door with bullets in door
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    Gettysburg Tours Center.

    by Sweetberry1 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Gettysburg Tour bus will take you through 23 miles of History.. giving you an unforgettable experience, with a complete and accurate commentary on the Battle of Gettysburg.
    This tour is very informative, explaining in great detail of the historical events that happened during this time. The tour lasts at least 2 hours, and in my opinion, is a great starting point, if you are not familiar with all the historical details. Even though I had read a lot about this time in history, prior to my visit, I came away with a more accurate picture, and a very spritual feeling for the men and women who lived through these turbulent times.

    The Gettysburg Tour Center
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  • "Broadway" show, Gettysburg feeling

    by Merrickindc Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This musical, the first to debut in Gettysburg, uses the words of real life men and women who lived in that era to communicate the emotional reality of this turbulant period. Unlike other Gettysburg destinations, it is not a history lesson -- it is an emotional experience.

    "For the Glory," by Broadway composer Frank Wildhorn, is playing at Gettysburg's newly-restored Majestic Theater, which is a stunning venue.

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    The Ampitheatre

    by PA2AKgirl Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Located on the battlefield, down a small trail from the Confederate state monuments, the ampitheatre was one of my favorite places as a kid. This is where some of the programs are given, but best of all, in the summer, it's where you'll find the campfires. One of the things I appreciate the most about the National Park Service is that it doesn't matter what kind of park is it--a battlefield, a national historical park, a national recreation area, national monument...they tend to keep up the tradition of giving campfires. It's great--story telling, activities, maybe some songs. If you have children, touring all day on the battlefield may not keep their interest all that long. The campfire is the perfect solution! It's great for me too--I'll never get sick of them:)

    Check out the program guides to see when they are given.

    Also, there are other special events held here--I THINK I can remember a little concert, definitely church services and some other things.

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    Oak Hill

    by MDH Updated Apr 4, 2011

    Oak Hill is located on the northern part of the battlefield, where the fight first began on July 1st when Confederate troops met dismantled Union calvary and the first elements of the main Federal army. The Southern forces, mostly North Carolinians, tried to charge and train their artillery on the Union troops, but each time, the Yankee soldiers repelled the Southerners, eventually surrounding them and cutting them to pieces. However the Union forces soon ran out of ammunition and were forced into a miserable retreat.

    Oak Ridge now has the Eternal Light Peace Memorial, which was dedicated by President Roosevelt and 1,800 Civil War veterans to a crowd of 250,000 in 1938. Ironically, it was made only one year before the Second World War.

    The Peace Memorial, with the Eternal Flame.
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    Spangler's Spring

    by MDH Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    On July 2nd, the Confederates mounted a bloody attack on the Union troops around Culp's Hill and the northern edge of Cemetery Ridge. The fighting was vicious here, the Confederates charged many times up the hill to outflank the Union troops. Many Union soldiers had to retreat to the nearby name-sake cemetery where they hid behind tombstones and uprooted coffins to avoid Southern bullets and cannonballs raining down.

    Nearby at Spangler's Spring, a natural spring in a lush hilly and pastured area where there was a great deal of fighting, wounded Confederate and Union troops sometimes crawled their way up to the spring to get a drink of water, with many of them dying along the way or dying at the foot of the spring. After the battle, the spring ran red for weeks until all the dead were cleared.

    During the battle, there were short truces between the two sides in order to get a much-needed drink here.

    The infamous Spangler's Spring (now covered).
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