Gettysburg National Military Park Things to Do

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    by Yaqui
  • Things to Do
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Most Recent Things to Do in Gettysburg National Military Park

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    DAY TWO: CARR’S (HOOKER’S) BRIGADE

    by mtncorg Updated Aug 13, 2012

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    1st Massachusetts Regiment along Emmittsburg Pike
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    This brigade, organized in late 1861, was first commanded by one Joseph Hooker. Old Joe was a fast riser and was headed for higher places, though, rising to division command a short time later and eventually commanded the Army of the Potomac in 1863. Hooker was originally from the Old Bay State and the composition of this brigade was mostly New England with the one Garden State regiment as an exception. Like many other older brigades, Hooker’s Brigade saw a lot of action before Gettysburg. At the Unfinished Railroad during the Battle of 2nd Manassas, they actually broke Stonewall Jackson’s line - while suffering 33% casualties - but the attack failed when no one else showed up to support them. At Chancellorsville, they had suffered 25% casualties on May 3 fighting on the Plank Road near the Chancellor House. Here, at Gettysburg, they were aligned along the Emmittsburg Pike. Their reserves had been stripped away by the many needs found among Birney’s divison that day. When the Rebels under Gen. William Barksdale had crushed and rolled the Union position at the Peach Orchard, Humphreys’ division, Hooker’s Brigade, commanded by Gen. Joseph Carr fought the good fight, slowly retreating towards Cemetery Ridge where the Federal line was made solid. The day had seen the heaviest losses of any battle for the brigade - 46% of their men. One soldier in the 1st Massachusetts was awarded the Medal of Honor for his exploits here July 2. Just another story among the many.

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    Culp's Hill Monuments #2

    by Yaqui Updated Jun 23, 2011

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    20th Connecticut Infantry Regiment
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    The First Monument:
    The monument to the Twentieth Connecticut Volunteers is southeast of Gettysburg on Slocum Avenue. It was erected in 1885 by the State of Connecticut.

    The regiment was commanded by Lieutenant Colonel William B. Wooster. It brought 434 men to the field and lost 5 killed, 22 wounded and 1 missing.

    From the monument:

    20th Conn. Vols.

    20th Conn. Vols. W. B. Wooster. Lt. Col. Comdg.
    1st Brig. 1st. Div. 12th A.C.

    The Brig. formed on this line on the morning of July 2nd. At eve it moved to the support left of army. Returning, it found the position and woods on rear occupied by Johnson's Division, Ewell's Corps. During the night it lay in line of battle. At dawn, July 3rd, the 20th Conn. advanced under cover of artillery and fought 5 hrs. driving the enemy and reoccupying the works. Was relieved by the 123rd N.Y. In the afternoon moved to support the 2nd Corps against Longstreet's assault.

    This regiment went from Va. with the 12th A.C. to Army of Cumberland, marched with Gen. Sherman to the sea.

    From the right side of the monument:

    Losses
    Gettysburg Killed and wounded. 28 Total killed and died of wounds 90 died of other causes 77 wounded 20 disabled and discharged 264 Prisoners 125

    From the left side:

    Engagements
    Chancellorsville
    Gettysburg
    Tracy City
    Boyds Trail
    Resacca
    Cassville
    Peach Tree Creek
    Turners Ferry
    Atlanta
    Savannah
    Charleston
    Silver Run
    Averysboro
    Bentonville

    The Second Monument:
    The monument to the 123rd New York Infantry Regiment is southeast of Gettysburg on Slocum Avenue. Featuring Clio, the muse of history, writing down the regiment's deeds, it was dedicated in1888 by the State of New York.

    The regiment was commanded at Gettysburg by Lieutenant Colonel James C. Rogers while its colonel, Archibald McDougall, commanded the brigade. It brought 495 men to the field, losing 3 killed, 10 wounded and 1 missing.

    From the front of the monument:

    123rd. New York
    Infantry
    1st. Brigade 1st. Division
    12th. Corps

    Historic.
    The 123rd N.Y. Was enlisted in Washington Co. in Aug. 1862 mustered into the U.S. service Sept. Joined the Army of the Potomac and was engaged in the battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. In Sept. 1863 transferred to the Army of the Cumberland and was engaged in the Campaign of Atlanta the March to the Sea and the Campaign of the Carolinas. Mustered out at Washington at the close of the war June 8, 1865.

    From the right side:

    Service at Gettysburg
    July 1: Marched from Littlestown; Formed line of battle on Wolf Hill; Bivouaced near Baltimore Pike

    July 2: Advanced to this line and built a heavy breastwork of logs. At about 6 p.m. moved to support the left near Little Round Top; Returning in the night found works in possession of enemy, as no troops were left to occupy them.

    July 3, at about 11 a.m. made a charge and recovered these works; about 4 p.m. moved to support line then repelling Pickett's Charge; a little later had a sharp skirmish in front of this line; at night repelled an attack with heavy loss to the enemy.

    July 4, made reconnaissance around Wolf Hill and through Gettysburg over the Hanover Road.

    From the left side:

    Engagements
    Chancellorsville • Kulp's Farm
    Gettysburg • Chattahoochie River
    Resaca • Peach Tree Creek
    Cassville • Atlanta
    New Hope Church • Montieth's Swamp
    Lost Mt. • Savannah
    Pine Hill • Averysboro
    Kennesaw • Bentonville
    Moccasin Swamp

    From the rear:

    123rd New York
    The Washington County
    Regiment
    12th and 20th Corps

    About 100 yards in front of the line of works, a marker indicates the position occupied by the skirmishers of this Regiment on the afternoon of July 3

    The Third Monument:
    Army of the Potomac
    Twelfth Corps
    First Brigade
    Brig. General Alpheus S. Williams
    Brig. General Thos. H. Ruger

    First Brigade Col. Archibald L. McDougall
    Second Brigade Brig. Gen. Henry H. Lockwood
    Third Brigade Brig. Gen. Thos. H. Ruger
    Col. Silas Colgrove

    July 1. Approaching Rock Creek on the Baltimore Pike the Division moved on a cross road to occupy Wolf Hill but retired at sunset and took position east of Rock Creek for the night. The First and Sixth Corps having been included in Gen. Slocum's command Gen. Williams assumed command of the Corps. Gen. Ruger of the First Division and Col. S. Colgrove of the Third Brigade.

    July 2. Brig. Gen. Lockwood's Brigade joined the Corps early in the morning not having been assigned to a division was subject to the direct orders of the Corps Commander until assigned July 5th to First Division. The Division at 8 A. M. crossed Rock Creek and formed on the right of Second Division its left on Culp's Hill the right in McAllister's Woods. Breastworks were constructed along the line. Late in the day the Division moved to support Third Corps and Johnson's Confederate Division advanced and occupied the vacant works.

    July 3. At daylight attacked the Confederate Infantry and was hotly engaged with charges and countercharges at different points until 10:30 A. M. when the Confederate forces retired.

    July 4. Early in the morning Gen. Slocum with a detachment of infantry and a battery made a reconnaissance in front to Gettysburg without opposition.

    Casualties Killed 6 Officers 90 Men Wounded 27 Officers 379 Men Captured or Missing 1 Officer 30 Men Total 533

    The Fourth Monument:
    No better example of a state caught between two sides occurred than at Culp's Hill, where the Union 1st Maryland Eastern Shore faced the Confederate 1st Maryland Battalion. Color Sergeant Robert Ross of the Union regiment was a cousin to Color Sergeant P.M. Moore of the Confederate battalion, who was wounded several times and captured by his neighbors.

    1st Md. Changed to
    2nd MD. Infantry. C.S.A.

    From the right side:

    On the morning of July 3rd the battalion moving by the left flank formed at right angles with and inside the works and charged under a fire in in front, flank and rear to a stone planted 100 yards west from this monument

    From the left side:

    400 Strength in Battle.
    52 Killed.
    140 Wounded.

    From the rear:

    The First Maryland
    Battalion Infantry,
    Lieut. Col. Jas. R. Herbert,
    Stewart's Brigade,
    Johnson's Division,
    Ewell's Corps,
    Army of Northern Virginia.
    Advancing from Rock Creek about 7 p.m. July 2nd
    Occupied the line of works at this point and held its position until next morning

    From the marker:

    Point reached
    by 1st Md.
    Battalion C.S.A.
    July 3rd
    1863

    The Fifth Monument:
    July 2. Position of the Regiment. at 7 p.m. the Brigade was withdrawn, and on returning during the night found the enemy in these works the Regiment took position in rear of this line with its right as indicated by the tablet erected to the left and rear; and from there a charge of the enemy at day light of the 3rd was repulsed after a contest of over seven hours in which the regiment participated it reoccupied and held the works until the close of the battle.

    29th Pennsylvania Infantry
    2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 12th Corps

    From the left side:

    Recruited in Philadelphia.
    Mustered in July 1861.
    Re-enlisted Dec. 8, 1863.
    Mustered out July 17, 1865.

    From the right side:

    Present at Gettysburg 485
    Killed 15
    Wounded 43
    Captured or missing 8

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    Spangler's Spring Monuments #2

    by Yaqui Updated Jun 1, 2011

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    3rd Brigade
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    Spangler’s Spring – About 7 pm, Confederate attacked the right flank of the Union army and occupied the lower slopes of Culp’s Hill. The next morning the Confederates were driven off after seven hours of fighting.

    The First Monument:

    From the monument:

    3rd Brigade
    1st. Division
    12th Corps
    107th N.Y.Infantry

    From the rear:

    Occupied this position on the morning of July 2d. Withdrawn at 4 p.m. and sent to near
    Little Round Top. Returning during the night found these works in possession of the enemy. During the morning of July 3 was in position near Baltimore Pike. Occupied these works at 2 p.m.

    From the left side:

    Engaged in all the operations of the 12th Corps in the east and the 20th Corps in the west from Antietam to close of the war

    The Second Monument:

    1st Maryland
    Regiment
    Potomac Home
    Brigade
    Vol. Infantry
    Colonel Wm. P. Maulsby
    Lockwood's Independent
    Brigade
    12th Corps

    Maryland's Tribute to her loyal sons

    From the right side:

    July 2nd reinforced the left wing between 5 and 6 o'clock p.m. charging under the immediate direction of Gen. Meade and recapturing three pieces of artillery
    ----
    July 3rd engaged the enemy at this point from 5 to 6 o'clock a.m. At 11 a.m. went to the assistance of the 2nd Div., 12th Corps engaging the enemy there for about four hours.

    From the let side:

    Effective strength 739
    ----
    Casualties
    killed 23, wounded 80
    missing 1, total 104
    ----
    Organized at
    Frederick, Md
    from Aug. 15th to
    Dec. 13th 1861.
    ----
    Principal engagements
    Maryland Heights, Md
    Sept. 13th 1862
    Gettysburg , Pa.
    July 2d - 3d 1863.
    Monocacy, Md
    July 9th 1864,
    and eight skirmishes.
    ----
    Mustered out May 29th 1865.

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    Spangler's Spring Monuments #1

    by Yaqui Updated Jun 1, 2011

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    Thirteenth New Jersey Vols.
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    The begining of your auto tour can start anywhere you like, but we started here since its across the highway from the Vistor Center off of PA-97 on Colgrove Avenue.

    Spangler’s Spring – About 7 pm, Confederate attacked the right flank of the Union army and occupied the lower slopes of Culp’s Hill. The next morning the Confederates were driven off after seven hours of fighting.

    The first monument:
    Thirteenth New Jersey Vols.
    Thirteenth Regiment N.J.V. reached this battle-field 5 p.m. July 1st 1863, and with the brigade went into position on the north side of Wolf Hill. During the night occupied a position in support of Battery M, First N.Y. Artillery. July 2, in morning held position near Culp's Hill. In afternoon marched to relief of Third Corps near Round Top. At night returned to right of the army. July 3, occupied position marked by this monument, supporting Second Massachusetts and Twenty-seventh Indiana in their charge on Confederate flank. In the evening moved to extreme right to support of Gregg's Cavalry.

    Second Monument/Historical Plaque:
    Army of the Potomac
    Twelfth Corps First Division
    Third Brigade
    Brig. Gen. Thomas H. Ruger
    Col. Silas Colgrove
    27th Indiana 2d Mass. 13th New Jersey
    107th New York 3d Wisconsin Infantry

    July 1. Arrived with the Division and bivouacked for the night east of Rock Creek.

    July 2. After sharp skirmishing in front crossed Rock Creek and went into position. The left on Culp's Hill the right in McAllister's Woods a swale between. Breastworks were constructed. At sunset went to support of the left of the Army and returned and found the works on left of swale occupied by Confederates. Those on the right were unoccupied and immediately repossessed.

    July 3. The 2d Mass. and 27th Indiana in the morning charged across the open swale to get possession of a stone wall and woods on the left but were repulsed with great loss the 27th Indiana falling back in a direct line the 2d Mass. towards the left. A Confederate countercharge was made across the swale but receiving a front and enfilading fire it was quickly repulsed and the Confederate force left the works and retired across Rock Creek.

    July 4. The Brigade with a battery and three regiments of First Brigade made a reconnaissance in front and around through the town the Confederate forces having withdrawn to Seminary Hill.

    Casualties Killed 2 Officers 47 Men Wounded 20 Officers 205 Men Captured or Missing 5 Men Total 279

    The Third Monument from 1879:
    Form the tablet on the front of the monument:

    From the hill behind this monument on the morning of July Third 1863 the Second Massachusetts Infantry made an assault upon the Confederate troops in the works at the base of Culp's Hill opposite. The regiment carried to the charge 22 officers and 294 enlisted men. It lost 4 officers and 41 enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 6 officers and 84 enlisted men wounded. To perpetuate the honored memories of that hour the survivors of the Regiment have raised this stone. 1879.

    From the rear:

    Lieut. Col. Charles R. Mudge Captain Thomas B. Fox Captain Thomas R. Robeson Lieut. Henry V.D. Stone
    ----
    Color bearers - Leavitt C. Durgin, Rupert J. Sadler, Stephen Cody
    First Sergeant Alonzo J. Babcock, Sergeant William H. Blunt.
    --Corporals--
    Charles Burdett, Theodore S. Butters, Jeremiah S. Hall, Patrick Heoy, Ruel Whittier, Gordon S. Wilson.
    --Privates--
    Samuel T. Alton, George M. Baily, Henry C. Ball, Wallace Bascom, John Briggs, Jr., David B. Brown, William T. Bullard, James A. Chase, Peter Conlan, John Derr, James T. Edmunds, William H. Ela, John E. Farrington, Silas P. Foster, Willard Foster, Joseph Furber, Fritz Goetz, Daniel A. Hatch, John J. Jewett, John Joy, Charles Kiernan, William Marshall, Frederick Maynard, Andrew Nelson, Rufus A. Parker, Philo H. Peck, Sidney S. Prouty, Richard Seavers, Charles Trayner, David L. Wade

    The regiment 's official strength and casualties are different from those listed on the monument, with 401 engaged, 23 killed, 109 wounded and 4 missing. It was part of 12th Corps - 1st Division - 3rd Brigade.

    The Fourth Monument:
    From the front of the monument:

    27th Ind. Infantry
    3rd Brigade,
    1st Division 12th Corps

    This monument marks the ground over which the left wing of the 27th Indiana advanced in a charge made by the regiment on the morning of July 3rd, 1863.
    Number engaged 339.
    Killed and wounded 110.
    Missing, one.

    From the left side:

    Silas Colgrove Col.
    The 27th Ind. was organized in August 1861 for three years or during the war. Reenlisted Jan. 1864. Consolidated with the 70th Ind. Aug. 1864. Mustered out in July 1865

    From the rear:

    27th Indiana Infantry
    Total enrollment 1101
    Killed & died of wounds 169
    Wounded not mortally 527
    Missing & captured 126
    Died of disease
    & other causes 127

    From the right side:

    Battles
    Front Royal
    Newtown
    Winchester
    Cedar Mountain
    Antietam
    Chancellorsville
    Gettysburg
    Resaca
    New Hope Church
    Kenesaw Mountain
    Peach Tree Creek
    Atlanta
    Averysburg
    Bentonville

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    High Water Mark-Copse of Trees Memorial

    by Yaqui Written May 30, 2011

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    High Water Mark – Late in the afternoon, after a two hour cannonade some 7,000 Union soldiers posted around the Copse of Trees, The Angle and the Brian Barn, repulsed the bulk of the 12,000 man “Pickett’s Charge” against the Federal center. This was the climactic moment of the battle. On July 4, Lee’s army began retreating.

    Commands Honored. In recognition of the patriotism and gallantry displayed by their respective troops who met or assisted to repulse Longstreet's Assault the following states have contributed to erect this tablet: Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, Michigan and Minnesota.

    High Water Mark of the Rebellion. This copse of trees was the landmark toward which Longstreet's Assault was directed July 3, 1863. The assaulting column was composed of Kemper's, Garnett's and Armistead's Brigades of Pickett's Division, Archer's Davis', Pettigrew's & Brockenbrough's Brigades of Heth's Division and Scales' and Lane's Brigades of Pender's Division, supported on the right by Wilcox' and Perry's Brigades of Anderson's Division; on the left by Thomas' and McGowan's Brigades of Anderson's Division, and assisted by the following artillery: Cabell's Battalion consisting of Manly's Fraser's, McCarthy's & Carlton's Batteries. Alexander's Battalion, Woolfolk's, Jordan's, Gilbert's, Moody's, Parker's & Taylor's Batteries, Eschelman's Battalion, Squires, Richardson's, Miller's & Norcom's Batteries, Dearing's Battalion, Stribling's, Caskie's, Macon's & Blount's Batteries, Cutt's Battalion, Ross's Patterson's & Wingfield's Batteries, Poague's Battalion, Wyatt's, Graham's, Ward's & Brooke's Batteries, Pegram's Battalion, Mc Craw's, Zimmerman's Brader's, Marye's & Crenshaw Battery. Mc Intosh's Battalion, Rice's Hurt's Wallace's & Johnson's Batteries, Carter's Battalion, Reese's, Carter's, Page's & Fry's Batteries, Brown's Battalion, Watson's Smith's Cunningham's & Griffin's Batteries.

    Repulse of Longstreet's Assault. Longstreet's Assault was repulsed by Webb's, Hall's & Harrow's Brigades of Gibbon's Division Second Army Corps; Smyth's & Willard's Brigades and portions of Carroll' Brigade of Hays' Division Second Army Corps; and the First Massachusetts Sharp-Shooters (unattached) portions of Rowley's & Stannard's Brigades of Doubleday's Division First Army Corps; Hazard's Second Corps Artillery Brigade, consisting of Woodruff's, Arnold's, Cushing's Brown's & Rorty's Batteries, assited on the right by Hill's, Edgell's, Eakin's, Bancroft's, Dilger's & Taft's Batteries on Cemetery Hill; and on the left by Cowan's, Fitzhugh's, Parson's, Wheeler's, Thomas', Daniels' & Sterling's Batteries and McGilvery's Artillery Brigade consisting of Thompson's, Phillip's, Hart's, Cooper's, Dow's, & Ames' Batteries, and by Hazlett's Battery on Little Round Top. And supported by Doubleday's Division of the First Army Corps which was in position on the immeidate left of the troops assaulted. The Third Army Corps moved up to within supporting distance on the left, and Robinson's Division of the First Army Corps moved in to position to support the right.

    Designed by and erected under the Superintendence of John B. Batchelder

    Cast by the Henry-Bonnard Bronze Co., New York, New York

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    High Water Mark Memorials

    by Yaqui Updated May 30, 2011

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    Vermont Infantry
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    The First Memorial:
    16th
    Vermont Infantry,
    Colonel W. G. Veazey
    commanding

    First Army Corps
    July 1-2-3-1863

    Participated near this point in action of July 2nd
    Picketed this line that night - held same as skirmishers
    until attacked by Pickett's Division, July 3rd.
    Rallied here and assaulted his flank to the right 400
    yards - then changing front charged left flank of Wilcox's
    and Perry's brigades. At this point captured many hundred prisoners and two stands of colors

    The point to which the above inscription refers
    is south 58 degrees, west 1000 feet
    from this monument
    and near the northerly end of the Codori thicket

    The Second Memorial:
    Vermont in honor of her sons who fought on this field.

    From the right side:

    First Vermont Brigade:
    Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth
    and Sixth Regiments;
    Brig. Gen. L. A. Grant commanding;
    Second Brigade, Second Division, Sixth Corps.
    ----
    The brigade reached the field
    near Little Round Top in the afternoon
    of July 2, 1863, by a forced march of
    thirty-two miles, and soon after
    was assigned to the left Union flank,
    where it held a line from the summit of
    Round Top to the Taneytown Road
    until the close of the battle.

    From the rear:

    Second Vermont Brigade:
    Twelfth, Thirteenth, Fourteenth,
    Fifteenth and Sixteenth Regiments
    Brig. Gen. George Stannard commanding
    Third Brigade, Third Division, First Corps.
    ----
    The brigade arrived on Cemetery Hill July 1, 1863.
    The Twelfth and Fifteenth Regiments were detached
    to guard the corps trains. About sunset, July 2,
    the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Sixteenth moved to
    this part of the field, retook Battery C, Fifth U.S.
    and re-established the Union line.
    ----
    July 3, these regiments held the front line in
    advance of this spot. In the crisis of the day, the
    Thirteenth and Sixteenth changed front, and advancing
    200 yards to the right, assaulted the flank of Pickett's
    Division. The Sixteenth then moved back 400 yards to
    the left and charged the flank of Wilcox's and Perry's
    Brigades. The Fourteenth supported these charges.
    The brigade captured three flags and many prisoners.

    From the left side:

    First Vermont Cavalry
    First Brigade, Third Division, Cavalry Corps.
    ----
    This regiment fought Stuart's Cavalry at
    Hanover, June 30, 1863, opposed Hampton's Cavalry
    at Hunterstown, July 2, and charged through the
    First Texas Infantry and upon the line of Law's
    Brigade at the foot of Round Top, July 3.
    ----
    Vermont Sharpshooters:
    Co. F. First U.S.S. Co's E and H, Second U.S.S.;
    Second Brigade, First Division, Third Corps.
    ----
    July 2, company F aided in checking the advance
    of Wilcox's Brigade west of Seminary Ridge.
    Companies E and H resisted Law's Brigade
    west of Devil's Den and upon the Round Tops.
    July 3, the three companies took part
    in the repulse of Pickett's Charge.

    The Third Memorial:
    Thirteenth Vermont Volunteer Infantry
    1862 - 1863
    On this field the right regiment of
    Stannard's Vermont Brigade
    Third Brigade Third Division First Corps

    July 2. Five companies under Lieut.-Colonel Wm. D. Munson supported Batteries on Cemetery Hill. Near evening the other five companies commanded by Colonel Francis V. Randall charged to the Rogers House on the Emmitsburg Road, captured 83 prisoners and recaptured 4 guns after which they took position here and were soon joined by the five companies from Cemetery Hill."

    July 3. In the morning 100 men advanced 45 yards under the fire of sharpshooters and placed a line of rail. When the Confederate column crossed the Emmitsburg Road the regiment advanced to the rail breastworks and opened fire as the Confederates obliqued to their left. The regiment changed front forward on first company advanced 200 yards attacking the Confederate right flank throwing it into confusion and capturing 243 prisoners.

    Officers and men engaged 480. Killed and mortally wounded 22, other wounded 80.

    From the left side:

    The regiment volunteered in the summer of 1862 and with 968 officers and men was mustered into service October 10, 1862. The average age of the men being 23 years.

    Prior to the Gettysburg campaign it served chiefly picketing a line betwen Centreville and Occoquan Va. Fourty-eight hours after the army passed pusuing the enemy to this field the regiment was ordered to join the First Corps.

    Haste was so urgent that an order forbade leaving the ranks for water and after forced marches with all the attendant privations incident thereto an lack of rations by reason of the commisary train being diverted it arrived on the battle field July 1.

    Mustered out at Brattleboro Vt. July 21, 1863.

    This monument was erected by one hundred and ninety-three of the survivors in 1899.

    From the rear:

    Francis V. Randall, Captain Second Vermont Infantry, Colonel Thirteenth Vermont Infantry, Colonel Seventeenth Vermont Infantry.

    July 2 In the charge Colonel Randall fell with his wounded horse but soon overtook and led the line on foot. July 3; When the Confederates began to yield to the flank attack and his order to cease firing was not heard he rushed in front of his line and by word and gesture made himself understood and thus saved the lives of many foes. He died at Northfield, Vermont, March 1, 1865. In 1893 the survivors of the Thirteenth erected a monument at his grave.

    From the right side:

    The statue represents Lieutenant Stephen F. Brown Co. K, who arrived on the field without a sword* but seizing a camp hatchet carried it in the battle until he captured a sword from a Confederate officer. Persevering and determined like him were all the men of this regiment of Green Mountain boys.

    The Fourth Memorial:
    Gibbon
    1827 - 1898

    John Gibbon Brigadier General
    July 2-3, 1863

    At Gettysburg commanded the 2nd Division II Corps on July 3, 1863 serving with "conspicuous gallantry and distinction" in the repulse of Longstreet's Assault until he was wounded and carried away from the battlefielld.

    At the beginning of the Civil War, John Gibbon was a captain in the 4th Artillery serving in the Utah Territory. Assigned as Chief of Artillery in McDowell's Division, he participated in the advance on Fredericksburg during the Peninsula Campaign. He was promoted to brigadier general May 2, 1862 thereafter taking command of the IRON BRIGADE which participated in the battles of Second Bull Run, South Mountain and Antietam. In November 1862, he took command of the 2nd Division, I Corps. He was wounded in the wrist during the battle of Fredericksburg, II Corps. He was wounded in the left arm and shoulder at the battle of Gettysburg. In charge of draft deposits in Cleveland and Philadelphia until March 1864, he returned to the 2nd Division, II Corps participating in the battles of Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor and the investment of Petersburg. Gibbon was promoted to major general effective June 7, 1864. He was in temporary command of the XVIII Corps before being placed in command of the XXIV Corps, Army of the James in January, 1865. General Gibbon was in charge of the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox, April 1865.

    "He has a keen eye and is as bold as a lion."

    From the tablet on the rear:

    John Gibbon was born April 20, 1827 in the Holmesburg section of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. At the age of ten he moved with his family to North Carolina where he remained until he entered the United States Military Academy at West Point. Gibbon graduated from the Academy in 1847, 20th in a class of 38, becoming an artillery officer. He served in the Mexican War fighting at Mexico City and Toluca. After serving in the Seminole Wars he spent five years as an instructor then quartermaster at the Military Academy. Gibbon authored, THE ARTILLERIST'S MANUAL, which was published by the War Department in 1860. After the Civil War, he was appointed colonel of the 36th U.S. Infantry and then in 1869 the 7th U.S. Infantry. Commanding several posts in the West, much of Gibbon's duties were against the Indians. His troops took part in the 1876 campaign in which Custer was defeated at the Little Big Horn. Gibbon's troops arrived on the field in time to rescue the survivors and bury the dead. In 1877 he took part in the campaign against the New Percés during which he was seriously wounded. On July 10, 1885, Gibbon was promoted to brigadier-general in the regular army. He transferred to the Department of Columbia in 1885, then served in the Department of the Pacific until his retirement. General Gibbon retired in 1891, thereafter residing in Baltimore, Maryland. He served as Commander-in-Chief of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States 1895-1896. General John Gibbon died on February 6, 1896 and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.

    The Fifth Memorial:
    42nd
    New York
    Infantry.
    3rd Brigade,
    2nd Division,
    2nd Corps.
    Tammany
    Regiment

    From the left side:

    July 2, 1863. Went to
    support of 3rd. Corps
    about 5 p.m. Held this
    position July 3rd, and,
    assisted in repulsing
    the assault of
    Pickett's Division.
    Casualties;
    Killed 15, wounded 55,
    missing 4.

    From the right side:

    Mustered into U.S.
    service June 22, 1861.
    Total enrollment 1210.
    Participated
    in 19 battles.
    Killed 92.
    Wounded 328.
    Missing 298.
    Mustered out
    July 13, 1864.

    From the rear:

    This regiment was raised and organized by Colonel William O. Kennedy under the patronage of the Tammany Society and of the Union Defense Committee of New York City.

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    State of Pennsylvania Monument

    by Yaqui Updated May 30, 2011

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    This monument so beautiful and the sheer size is impressive. It stands at 110 feet and was dedicated in September 27, 1910. It is build with North Carolina granite build over iron. All the huge tablets are made of bronze listing all the different regiments. (P.S. Californians were part of the Pennsylvania Regiments) It has bronze statues of Generals George Meade, John Reynolds, Winfield Scott Hancock, David Birney, Alfred Pleasonton and David Gregg, Governor Andrew Curtin and President Lincoln in each of the arches. There is a spiral staircase in one of the columns that takes you to the top for some fantastic views. The memorial is topped with Winged Victory sculpture by Samuel Murray.

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    Hancock Avenue Memorials

    by Yaqui Updated May 30, 2011

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    The State of New York in recognition of the services rendered by those corps division and brigade commanders at Gettysburg not elsewhere honored on this field.

    Maj. Gen. Daniel Edgar Sickles
    U.S. Volunteers
    Commanding Third Corps

    Maj. Gen. Daniel Butterfield
    U.S. Volunteers
    Chief of Staff A.O.P.

    Brig. Gen. Marsena Rudolph Patrick
    U.S. Volunteers
    Provost Marshall Gen.

    Brig. Gen. Robert Ogden Tyler
    U.S. Volunteers
    Commanding Artillery ReserveBrig.

    Gen. Wesley Merritt
    U.S. Volunteers
    Commanding Reserve Brig. Cav. Corps

    Col. Thomas Casimer Devin
    6th N.Y. Cav. Volunteers
    Commanding 2nd Brig. 1st Div. Cav. Corps

    Brig. Gen. Henry Baxter
    U.S. Volunteers
    Commanding 2nd Brig. 2nd Div. 1st Corps

    Col. Adrian Rowe Root
    94th N.Y. Volunteers
    Commanding 1st Brig. 2nd Div. 1st Corps

    Col. Roy Stone
    149th Penn. Volunteers
    Commanding 2nd Brig. 3rd Div. 1st Corps

    Col. Charles Sheils Wainwright
    1st N.Y. Light Artillery
    Commanding Artillery Brig. 1st Corps

    Brev. Maj. Gen. Samuel Kurtz Zook
    U.S. Volunteers
    Commanding 3rd Brig. 1st Div. 2nd Corps

    Col. Norman Jonathan Hall
    7th Mich. Volunteers
    Commanding 3rd Brig. 2nd Div. 2nd Corps

    Col. Eliakim Sherrill
    126th N.Y. Volunteers
    Commanding 3rd Brig. 3rd Div. 2nd Corps

    Col. George Lamb Willard
    125th N.Y. Volunteers
    Commanding 3rd Brig. 3rd Div. 2nd Corps

    Col. Patrick Kelly
    88th N.Y. Volunteers
    Commanding 2nd Brig. 1st Div. 2nd Corps

    Lt. Col. James M. Bull
    126th N.Y. Volunteers
    Commanding 3rd Brig. 3rd Div. 2nd Corps

    Lt. Col. Francis Edwin Pierce
    108th N.Y. Volunteers
    Commanding 2nd Brig. 3rd Div. 2nd Corps

    Brig. Gen. J. H. Hobart Ward
    U.S. Volunteers
    Commanding 2nd Brig. 1st Div. 3rd Corps

    Brig. Gen. Charles Kinnaird Graham
    U.S. Volunteers
    Commanding 1st Brig. 1st Div. 3rd Corps

    Brig. Gen. Joseph Bradford Carr
    U.S. Volunteers
    Commanding 1st Brig. 2nd Div. 3rd Corps

    Col. Philip Regis Detrobriand
    38th N.Y. Volunteers
    Commanding 3rd Brig. 1st Div. 3rd Corps

    Col. William R. Brewster
    73rd N.Y. Volunteers
    Commanding 2nd Brig. 2nd Div. 3rd Corps

    Col. Hiram Berdan
    1st U.S. Sharpshooters
    Commanding 2nd Brig. 1st Div. 3rd Corps

    Brig. Gen. Romeyn Beck Ayres
    U.S. Volunteers
    Commanding 2nd Div. 5th Corps

    Brig. Gen. Stephen Hinsdale Weed
    U.S. Volunteers
    Commanding 3rd Brig. 2nd Div. 5th Corps

    Col. James Clay Rice
    44th N.Y. Volunteers
    Commanding 3rd Brig. 1st Div. 5th Corps

    Col. Kenner Garrard
    146th N.Y. Volunteers
    Commanding 3rd Brig. 2nd Div. 5th Corps

    Brig. Gen. David Allen Russell
    U.S. Volunteers
    Commanding 3rd Brig. 1st Div. 6th Corps

    Brig. Gen. Joseph Jackson Bartlett
    U.S. Volunteers
    Commanding 2nd Brig. 1st Div. and
    3rd Brig. 3rd Div. 6th Corps

    Brig. Gen. Alexander Shaler
    U.S. Volunteers
    Commanding 1st Brig. 3rd Div. 6th Corps

    Col. Charles Henry Tompkins
    1st R.I. Light Artillery
    Commanding Artillery Brig. 6th Corps

    Col. David J. Nevin
    62nd N.Y. Volunteers
    Commanding 3rd Brig. 3rd Div. 6th Corps

    Brig. Gen. Adolph Von Steinwehr
    U.S. Volunteers
    Commanding 2nd Div. 11th Corps

    Col. Leopold Von Gilsa
    41st N.Y. Volunteers
    Commanding 1st Brig. 1st Div. 11th Corp

    Col. George Von Amsberg
    45th N.Y. Volunteers
    Commanding 1st Brig. 3rd Div. 11th Corps

    Col. Wladimir Krzyzanowski
    58th N.Y. Volunteers
    Commanding 2nd Brig. 3rd Div. 11th Corps

    Col. Charles Robert Coster
    134th N.Y. Volunteers
    Commanding 1st Brig. 2nd Div. 11th Corps

    Maj. Thomas Ward Osborn
    1st N.Y. Light Artillery
    Commanding Artillery Brig. 11th Corps

    Brig. Gen. Thomas Howard Ruger
    U.S. Volunteers
    Commanding 1st Div. 12th Corps

    Col. Archibald L. McDougall
    123rd N.Y. Volunteers
    Commanding 1st Brig. 1st Div. 12th Corps

    Col. Silas Colgrove
    27th Indiana Infantry
    Commanding 3rd Brig. 1st Div. 12th Corps

    The Second Memorial
    4th Pennsylvania Cavalry
    3rd Brigade 2nd Division
    Cavalry Corps
    Army of the Potomac

    From the rear:

    Detached on the morning of July 2nd from the Brigade at the junction of White Run and Baltimore Turnpike, ordered to report to Headquarters, Army of the Potomac. Supported a battery temporarily near this position. On picket at night, retiring late on the afternoon of the 3rd to Second Cavalry Division.

    Mustered in Aug. 5 to Oct. 30 1861. Re-enlisted Jan. 1 1864. Mustered out July 1865. Recruited in Northampton, Allegheny, Westmoreland, Indiana, Venango, Lebanon and Luzerne Counties.

    Total enrollment 1930.
    Killed and died of wounds: officers 9, men 92, total 101 Died of disease, etc.: officers 3, men 252, total 255
    Wounded: officers 2, men 248, total 269
    Captured or missing: officers 5, men 266, total 271
    Total casualties 896

    From Mechanicsville June 26 1862
    to Appomattox April 9, 1865.

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    Sedgwick Avenue Memorials

    by Yaqui Updated May 30, 2011

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    The First Memorial
    Major General John Sedgwick
    In command of The Sixth Corps Army of the Potomac
    at Chancellorsville, Gettysburg,
    The Wilderness, and Spotsylvania.
    Born at Cornwall, Conn. September 13th 1813.
    Killed at Spotsylvania, Va. May 9th 1864

    Erected by the State of Connecticut
    In grateful memory of the service given to the nation by her honored son
    John Sedgwick
    Loyal citizen, Illustrious soldier
    Beloved commander

    The Second Memorial:
    First Brigade
    New Jersey Volunteers.
    Brig. Gen. Alfred T.A. Torbert,
    1st, 2d, 3d, 4th, and 15th
    Regiments Infantry
    1st Brigade, 1st Div., 6th Corps.
    July 2, in reserve, July 3 and 4
    detached from the corps,
    held this position.
    Erected by the State of
    New Jersey, A.D. 1888,
    in testimony of the patriotism,
    courage and patient endurance
    of her volunteer soldiers.

    From the rear:

    Kearny's
    New Jersey Brigade
    fought in all important battles of the Army of the Potomac from May 1861 to the end of the war at Appomattox Court House in 1865. Total Strength 13,805, including 10th, 23rd, and 40th
    Regiments New Jersey Volunteers, which were attached to the brigade.

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    Little Round Top Memorials #3

    by Yaqui Updated May 30, 2011

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    Led to this spot by his military sagacity on July 2, 1863
    General Gouverneur Kemble Warren
    Then Chief Engineer of the Army of the Potomac detected General Hood's flanking movement and by promptly assuming the responsibility of ordering troops to this place saved the key of the Union position.

    Promoted for gallant services from the command of a regiment in 1861, through successive grades to the command of the 2nd Army Corps in 1863, and permanently assigned to that of the 5th Army Corps in 1864.
    Major General Warren needs no eulogy.
    His name is enshrined in the hearts of his countrymen.

    This statue is erected under the auspices of the veteran organization of his old regiment, the 5th New York Vols. Duryee Zouaves in memory of their beloved commander.

    Dedicated August 8th 1888

    The Eye of General Warren Plaque:
    About 3:30pm on July 2, the Union army's Chief Engineer Brig Gen. G.K. Warren, stepped out on these rocks with his binoculars. General Meade had sent him to examine battlefield conditions in this area. Warren found Union signalmen here, but no infantry. Llittle Round Top was undefended. Warren discovered that Confederate troops were concealed in the woods just beyond the Emmitsburg Road the second line of trees on the horizon. If these Southerners were allowed to seize Little Round Top, the Union army would be dangerously outflanked. General Warren quickly dispatched aides to seek troops to defend the hill. Col.Strong Vincent's Brigade arrived just in time to meet the on rushing Confederates, and a bloody conflict ensued. When Vincent's men were nearly overwhelmed, Warren found Col. Patrick O'Rorke's 14th New York Infantry on the hillside behind you and rushed them into the fight ot save the day for the Union.

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    Little Round Top Memorials #2

    by Yaqui Updated May 30, 2011

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    The First Memorial:
    Fraternity
    Col. Pat'k H. O'Rorke
    Killed July 2, 1863

    From the left (north) side:

    Valor
    140th
    N.Y. Infty.
    3rd Brigade
    2nd Division
    5th Corps
    July 2 & 3, 1863

    From the right (south) side:

    Duty
    Number engaged
    526
    ----
    Casualties
    26 killed
    89 wounded
    18 missing

    From the rear:

    Patriotism
    July 2nd and 3rd
    1863

    The Second Memorial:
    Army of the Potomac
    Fifth Corps Artillery Brigade
    Battery D Fifth U.S. Artillery
    Six Rifled 10 Pounders
    Lieut. Charles E. Hazlett commanding

    July 2 Marched to the left of the Union line about 4.30 p.m. and in rear of Brig. General J. Barnes's First Division Fifth Corps. Immediately upon taking position here at 5:45 opened fire upon the Confederates who were engaging the Division. The battery kept up a continuous fire until after dark. Lieut. Hazlett was mortally wounded and the command devolved upon Lieut. Benjamin F. Rittenhouse.

    July 3 Remained in position and in the afternoon did effective service on the lines of infantry engaged in Longstreet's Assault.

    Casualties: Killed 1 officer and 8 men, wounded 5 men

    The Third Memorial:
    91st Penna.
    Infantry.
    3rd Brig.
    2nd Div.
    5th Corps

    From the front (east) panel:

    July 2. Moving at the double-quick in the evening, the regiment took position here and having aided in repulsing the attack of the enemy upon this line, remained until the close of the battle.

    From the north panel:

    Present at
    Gettysburg 258
    officers and men.
    Killed and died
    of wounds 4 men.
    Wounded 2
    officers 13 men.
    ----
    Recruited in
    Philadelphia.
    Mustered in
    Sept & Dec. 1861,
    re-enlisted
    Dec. 26, 1863,
    Mustered out
    July 10, 1865

    The monument was erected in 1889 by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and replaces an earlier monument (below). Shaped like a fortress tower, it is topped by the Maltese Cross that is the symbol of the Union 5th Army Corps.

    The regiment was commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Joseph H. Sinex. It brought 258 men to the field, losing 3 killed and 16 wounded.

    The Fourth Memorial:
    Army of the Potomac
    Fifth Corps First Division
    Third Brigade
    Col. Strong Vincent Col. James C. Rice
    20th Maine 16th Michigan 44th NewYork
    83d Pennsylvania Infantry

    July 2. After 4 P. M. moved with the Division left in front to the support of the Third Corps line. The Brigade was detached and took position on Little Round Top advancing to the crests at the south and southwest. The 20th Maine 83d Penna. 44th New York and 16th Michigan took position from left to right. They were immediately attacked by Brig. Gen. Law's Brigade and the contest raged for over two hours and until dark when the attack was repulsed with great loss in killed wounded and prisoners. Over 500 prisoners including 15 commissioned officers were captured. The 20th Maine and the 83d Penna. extended their lines after dark to the summit of Round Top.

    July 3. Took position about noon with Second Brigade near the left centre of the main line of battle and remained in reserve through the day exposed to severe shelling but without loss.

    July 4. Made a reconnaissance to the front without finding any Confederate forces in positions occupied by them the previous day.

    Casualties Killed 6 Officers 83 Men Wounded 17 Officers 236 Men Captured or Missing 11 Men Total 353

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    Little Round Top Memorials #1

    by Yaqui Written May 30, 2011

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    Although all the memorials are beautiful, this one is very unique because it is built to let visitors explore it from the inside and has a roof top viewing area to see such a fantastic view.

    The 44th N.Y. Infantry, Lieut. Colonel Freeman Conner
    commanding, held position about 100 feet in advance of
    this monument, designated by a marker, from about 3 p.m. July 2, to about 11 a.m. July 3, 1863.

    Number engaged 313.
    Casualties.
    Killed, 2 officers, 24 enlisted men
    Wounded, 5 officers (of whom one died), 75 enlisted
    men (of whom ten died).
    Total loss, 106.
    At noon of July 3rd, was placed in reserve at the right of Little Round Top where it remained until close
    of the battle.

    From the right tablet, west side:

    The 44th New York Infantry was organized at Albany, N.Y., August 8th—October 21, 1861. Number enlisted, 1096. Assigned to Brigade commanded by General Daniel Butterfield Subsequently known as 3d Brig. 1st Div. 5th Corps, A. P. In October 1862, two full companies, one of Albany State Normal School students, and the other from Yates Co., N. Y. were added. Total enrollment, 1585."

    Engagements
    ----
    Yorktown, Hanover Court House, Gaines' Mill, Malvern Hill, Groveton, Antietam, Shepherdstown Ford, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Middleburg, Gettysburg, Jones' Cross Roads, Rappahannock Station, Mine Run, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, North Anna, Bethesda Church, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Weldon Railroad, Poplar Spring Church."

    Casualties
    ----
    Killed, 3 officers, 122 enlisted men.
    Wounded, 35 officers (of whom one died), 504 enlisted men
    (of whom sixty-two died).
    Died of disease, 2 officers, 145 enlisted men.
    Missing in action, 50 enlisted men.
    Mustered out at Albany N.Y. Oct. 1864.
    Men whose term had not expired transferred to 140th
    and 146th N.Y. Infantry "

    From the right tablet flanking the entryway to the east:

    12th N.Y. Infantry
    D & E Companies
    Lt. Col. H.W. Ryder Com'd'g.
    3d Brigade,
    1st Division
    5th Corps
    On Duty at 5th Corps
    Headquarters
    July 1st, 2nd & 3rd 1863

    From the left tablet flanking the east entryway:

    12th N. Y. Infantry
    or some part of it was
    present at all battles
    of the 5th Corps
    Army of the Potomac
    from
    Hanover Court House
    May 27th 1862
    to
    Appomattox April 9th 1865.

    A bronze tablet is on the south side of the doorway to the castle tower on the second level:

    The 12th N.Y. Regt.
    at
    Gettysburg

    It had two companies under Lt. Col. Ryder, on duty at Headquarters as Provost Guard 5th Corps and Headquarters Army of the Potomac.

    On the 1st day of battle, General Francis Channing Barlow (formerly Lieut. of 12th) was severly wounded commanding 1st Div. 11th Corps.

    On 2nd day of battle, General Daniel E. Sickles (formerly a captain of 12th) was severely wounded commanding 3rd Army Corps.

    On the 3rd day of battle, General Daniel Butterfield (who, as Colonel, brought the 12th Regt. to the war) was wounded and disabled at Headquarters as Chief of Staff
    of the Army.

    At the begining of the war, this was the first Reg't to cross Long Bridge on advance of the Union Army May 24th 1861.

    At Appomattox the two companies of the 12th consolidated with the 5th N.Y Vet. Infy. under Lt. Col. H. W. Ryder & Maj. Paul A. Oliver took charge of the surrendered Confederate arms.

    It had 66 enlisted men killed or died of wounds received in action, 67 enlisted men died of disease, 4 enlisted men died in the hands of the enemy.

    It had officers killed or died of wounds in various battles: Captain Wm. H. Hoagland, Captain Jas. Cromie, Captain Jos. Turkington, Captain Henry C. Burton, Captain Wm. Stockman Woods, Lieut. Edward M. Fisher.

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    Warfield Ridge Memorials & Plaque

    by Yaqui Updated May 30, 2011

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    Ninth Regiment Infantry Massachusetts Volunteers
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    The First Memorial:

    Erected by the
    Ninth Regiment Infantry Massachusetts Volunteers
    2nd Brigade, 1st Division
    5th Army Corps,
    Army of the Potomac.

    During the Battle of Gettysburg the Ninth Regt. was detached from the 2nd Brigade and it held
    this position on Round Top Casualties 26 men.

    From the right side:

    The Ninth Regiment Mass. Vols. was composed of ten companies of 101 me each
    from Boston, Salem, Milford, Marlboro and Stoughton, and organized at Boston May 9, 1861. Mustered into the United States Volunteer Service June 11, 1861. Mustered out at Boston
    June 21, 1864. Commanded respectively by Colonel Thomas Cass and Colonel Patrick R. Guiney.

    From the rear:

    The Ninth Regiment Mass. Vols. served during three years campaigns in Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania and was in forty two engagements including the following viz. Peninsula Campaign Hanover Court House Seven Days Battles:
    Antietam
    Fredericksburg
    Chancellorsville
    Gettysburg
    Mine Run
    Wilderness Campaign.
    Total number casualties 863.

    From the left side:

    Erected on Round Top
    Battlefield of Gettysburg
    June 1885

    The Second Memorial:
    10th Pennsylvania Reserves
    39th Penna Infantry
    3d Brigade 3d Division 5th Corps

    July 2nd occupied this line
    of stone fence and remained from
    5 p.m. until the close of battle.

    Present at Gettysburg: 29 officers, 392 men
    Killed, 2 men
    Wounded 3 men
    Total 5.

    From the right side:

    Mustered in June 3 to July 3 1861
    Mustered out June 11, 1864
    Recruited in Warren, Crawford, Mercer,
    Venango, Lawrence, Clarion, Beaver,
    Washington and Somerset Counties.
    Total enrollment 1150

    Killed and died of wounds, 7 officers, 130 men, 137 total
    Died of disease etc. 50 men, 50 total
    Wounded 13 officers, 261 men, 274 total
    Captured and missing 3 officers, 140 men, 143 total
    Total casualties 604.

    Dranesville
    Mechanicsville
    Gaines' Mill
    Glendale
    Malvern Hill
    Gainesville
    Groveton
    2d Bull Run
    South Mountain

    Antietam
    Fredericksburg
    Gettysburg
    Bristoe Station
    Mine Run
    Wilderness
    Spotsylvania
    North Anna
    Totopotomoy

    Bethesda Church

    The Third Historical Plaque
    On the afternoon of July 2 1863 Union General Governeur K. Warren found Little Round Top undefended. He quickly sent his staff to find troops to defend this vital position. General George Sykes, commanding the 5th Corps, agreed to send a brigade to occupy hill. Sykes orders were intercepted by Colonel Strong Vincent, commanding the Third Brigade, First Division, Fifth Corps. Without waiting for approval from his commanding officer, Vincent "took the responsibility of taking my brigade there," to Little Round Top.

    Riding ahead of his troops, Vincent ascended this hill and selected the ground where his brigade would make its defense. Vincent personally placed each of his four regiments. he entrusted his left flank to Colonel Joshua I.Chamberlain's 20th Maine. Vincent's orders to Chamberlain were to "hold the ground at all hazards," within minutes of forming his line, Vincent's brigade was assulted by Confederate regiments of Law's and Robertson's brigades. A desparate battle ensued across the entire brigade line. The line held, but the cost was high, including Vincent, who was mortally wounded.

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    Farnsworth's Cavalry Charge Plaque/Wells Memorial

    by Yaqui Written May 30, 2011

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    Farnsworth's Cavalry Charge Plaque:
    One of the last, and most futile, engagements at Gettysburg occurred here at the end of the third day. Union cavalry commanded by Brig. Gen. Judson Kilpatrick had moved into this area to harass the rear and right of the Confederate line. To the north, the Confederates in Pickett's Charge had been badly beaten, but the Southern position here remianed strong. About 5:00pm Kilpatrick ordered Brig.Gen. Elon J.Farnsworth to lead a cavalry charge against a line of Confederate infantry in the fields and woods surrounding the Slyder Farm in front of you. Farnsworth protested, believing it would be suicidal for cavalry to attack foot soldiers over ground obstructed by fences, boulders, ditches, and timber. Kilpatrick, who boasted cavalary could fight anywhere except at sea, would not reconsider. Farnsworth obeyed and rode off with some 300 troopers. Encountering deadly fire on all sides, horsemen were shot from their saddles like ducks in a shooting gallery. General Farnsworth fell on the rugged hillside to your right with five mortal wounds, and, it is said, with his saber raised.

    The Second Monument:
    William Wells, Brevet Major General U.S. Vols. 1837 - 1892. First Lieut. Co. C 1st Vermont Cavalry Oct. 14 1861. Captain Co. C Nov. 18 1861. Major Dec. 30 1862. Colonel July 2 1864. Brevet Brigadier General U.S. Vols. Feb. 22 1865. Brevet Major General U.S. Vols. "For gallant and meritorious services" March 13 1865. Brigadier General U.S. Vols. May 19 1865. Honorably mustered out Jan. 15 1866. Once wounded and once a prisoner. Awarded Medal of Honor for "most distinguished gallantry at Gettysburg" July 3 1863. Commander of Sheridan's Cavalry Corps.

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    The Wounded and the Dead Plaque

    by Yaqui Updated May 30, 2011

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    In the three days at Gettysburg, 7,708 soldiers were killed 26,856 were wounded. Never before had them been so many dead, dying, and maimed on an American battlefield. Teh human misery was monumental, as was the task of caring for the wounded and burying the dead. Schools, churches, homes, and farm buildings - including John Slyder's farm in front of you - were converted into emergency shelters and field hospitals. Clothing and sheets were ripped for bandages and barn doors became operating tables. Army surgeons labored until they collapsed. Amputated arms and legs accumulated in piles. Doctors, nurses, and volunteers remained at Gettysburg four months to care for the wounded. Citizens also responded to the soldiers suffering with donations of money, food, letters, and gifts. Few civilians were injured furing the battle, but many, like the Slyders here lost property, livestock, and crops.

    Painful Scene
    A trooper of the 3rd Pensylvania Cavalr served picket duty here at the Slyder farm the night after the battle: "The house was being used as a field hospital and was filled with wounded upon whom the surgeons were engaged in their revolting work. As fast as the men died their bodies were taken out of the house and into the rain and left there temporarily. The scene was so painful and sickening to us that we determined to remain with the picket reserve out in the pitiless downpour of rain.

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