Elfreth's Alley, Philadelphia

4 out of 5 stars 16 Reviews

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  • Elfreth's Alley
    Elfreth's Alley
    by TravellerMel
  • Elfreth's Alley
    Elfreth's Alley
    by TravellerMel
  • Elfreth's Alley
    Elfreth's Alley
    by TravellerMel
  • Pawtuxet's Profile Photo

    Here is the story...

    by Pawtuxet Updated Dec 3, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Elfreth's Alley
    This National Historic Landmark,
    named for blacksmith
    Jeremiah Elfreth , has been
    continuously occupied since 1713.
    The houses standing date from
    1728 - 1836 representing Colonial
    and Federal style architecture.

    The public is invited to visit
    The Museum House at No. 126.

    Please respect our privacy.

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    Elfreth’s Alley

    by mindcrime Written Oct 18, 2010

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    Elfreth���s Alley
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    Elfreth’s Alley is a national historic landmark because it dates back from 16th century, the oldest residential street in US. It’s a picturesque small alley with 33 private homes, some of them are really old and you can visit only those that are open to the public (on certain occasions like christmass period etc). There are only two houses (at number 124) that housing a small museum and are open all year round with small guided tours and a nice gift shop.

    There’s no entrance fee to see/walk the alley but you have to pay $2 for the small museums that are open daily 10.00-16.00

    Some people may find funny/interesting the actors with colonial costumes along the alley but the only thing I liked here was the colorful houses, the row of these colonial houses is really charming.

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  • ringleader's Profile Photo

    Visit Elfreth's Alley circa. 1789

    by ringleader Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This is the oldest continuously occupied residential street in the nation and a National Historic Landmark. This streetscape of 33 Colonial- and Federal-style homes was once occupied by artisans, including blacksmith Jeremiah Elfreth. There was a Windsor Chair home as well. Two homes are open to the public for guided tours showcasing the allwy's 300-year old history and 18th century life in Colonial America.

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  • bct341's Profile Photo

    A walk through America's oldest resident street

    by bct341 Updated Aug 2, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Elfreth's Alley

    Step back in time and imagine city life in the early 1700's as you gaze up Georgian style homes known locally as "trinity" style. Trinity style is named such because of having one room per floor and is likened to the religious trinity--Father, Son and Holy Ghost. These narrow tall buildings have a kitchen in the basement, a living area on the ground floor, and a bedroom on the top floor. A visit to the gift shop shows you how tiny these homes are. Make sure to go deep into the street to see Bladen's court. This is an alley within an alley that leads to a unique home built with a balcony.

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  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    The Oldest Such in America

    by mrclay2000 Written Dec 28, 2005

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    looking eastward on the alley
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    Elfreth's Alley is the oldest continuously residential street in the United States. Though a glance seems to indicate a greater number, there are actually only thirty-three Federal or Colonial houses here dating from the first half of the 18th century. Dates all along the alley record 1730s and 1750s era establishments or architecture. Since this is an actual residential area though an important tourist destination, signs warn visitors to keep somewhat quiet. . .otherwise homeowners might get uptight. Even a soft conversation in the midst of this "road" can be heard from four or five living room. More so than the other historical sites in town, a second's immersion here will remind one almost instantly of Washington's time (with good reason, since the two are contemporary).

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  • apbeaches's Profile Photo

    Elfreths Alley

    by apbeaches Written Nov 29, 2008

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    The oldest residential street in America; dating back to the 1700's. Charming row houses have a cell phone tour. Museum on row does a :20 walking tour. We saw historic figures walk through in costume. The Elfreth's Alley Association preserves the alley's historic structures while interpreting the street's 300-year history.

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  • dmarino622's Profile Photo

    Elfreth's Alley

    by dmarino622 Written Jan 29, 2007

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    Tucked away amid much commerce is the oldest continuously inhabited residential area in America. Note, it is not the earliest Philadelphia settlement, that being Southwark (Front to 4th St. between South and Washington) which has been bulldozed and replaced with low cost residences. Elfreth's Alley is instead an elegant trip through one of the most lovely urban alleys you'll ever see. It is located between Market and Arch on 2nd St. though it is kinda tough to find. They will give people a tour and history of the alley. And yes, people are still living there.

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  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Bladen's Court

    by mrclay2000 Written May 27, 2006

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    Bladen's Court
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    For those who especially wish to find colonial Philadelphia, just step away from the heavy pedestrian traffic of Elfreth's Alley into Bladen's Court, a tiny offshoot virtually untouched since its construction. As the name implies this is merely another residential section belonging to the same period as the Alley, but without its veneer, and therefore seemingly more genuine. The houses here are encased in brick, the windows are austere if not cheerless, and the railings look like they've weathered the centuries. All in all the place is well kept and easy to visit, requiring but minutes of your time.

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  • seagoingJLW's Profile Photo

    Elfreth's Alley

    by seagoingJLW Written Mar 21, 2003

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    Elfreth's Alley

    Many of the alley's 33 houses were built prior to 1776. The alley is a National Historic Landmark and the oldest residential street in the United States. Thousands of visitors come here every year .

    There is no other neighborhood like this. You will see families, professionals and other residents who choose to live here and keep the past alive.

    There is also a museum

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  • Pawtuxet's Profile Photo

    tiny old street

    by Pawtuxet Written Dec 2, 2004

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Elfreth's Alley, they call it. Just as small and quaint as anything I've ever seen. Each doorway is decorated or designed slightly differently. These "row houses" have remained a typical housing style throughout Philadelphia.

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  • brazwhazz's Profile Photo

    Don't plan your day around it, but...

    by brazwhazz Written Nov 23, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Elfreth's Alley, deserted on a late autumn evening

    Elfreth's Alley, believed to be oldest continuously inhabited street in the United States dating back to the early 18th century, has been classified as a National Historic Landmark.

    While coming here should in no way constitute an "outing" (the street is really quite short), the picturesque row of colonial houses is really quite charming, especially if you are around at a time when there are not too many tourists.

    Basically, if Elfreth's Alley is on your way, take a few minutes to check it out. There are other similar houses around the city, but not as neatly packed as they are here.

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  • acemj's Profile Photo

    Elfreth's Alley

    by acemj Updated Oct 22, 2005

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    Elfreth's Alley is the oldest residential street in the country. And my sister and brother-in-law lived on it! for ten years. It's a quaint street with an interesting museum.

    Please respect the resident's privacy. Sometimes my sister would get sick of the tourist's trying to peek in her windows.

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  • TexasDave's Profile Photo

    Elfreth's Alley

    by TexasDave Written Apr 13, 2006

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    Described as the "Nation's Oldest Residential Street" this alley contains 33 houses, most of which are still private homes.
    Walking the alley gives you a feel of 18th century living. Visit # 124, The Chairmaker's House, for free or take a guided tour for $2 adults, $1 children.
    Special Events take place in Summer months where many private homes are open as well, check their website.

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  • TravellerMel's Profile Photo

    Elfreth's Alley - America's Oldest Inhabited St.

    by TravellerMel Written Jun 24, 2011
    Elfreth's Alley
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    Elfreth's Alley is commonly regarded to be the oldest continuously inhabited street in America. Most of Colonial Philadelphia looked like this: cobblestone lanes between the major thoroughfares, small two-story homes, and pent eaves over doors and windows, a local trademark.

    Since 1702, Elfreth's Alley has been home to more than 3,000 people. Today thirty-two houses, built between 1728 and 1836, line the alley. They form one of the last intact early American streetscapes in the nation. Elfreth's Alley is a National Historic Landmark District, one of the first districts to celebrate the lives of everyday Americans.

    Today, most of the buildings are private homes, although there is public access to two of them (#s 124 & 126) through the guided tour at the museum (Adults $5; family $12.00; children 6–12 years $2.00; children under 6 FREE). Or you can hear the house-by-house story of the Alley's early residents through a free cellphone tour, available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

    It was interesting to walk down a street with nearly 300 year old buildings - I love this stuff! Even if all you do is walk down the alley and absorb the history, I would recommend making this stop on your trip to Philly.

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  • Bavavia's Profile Photo

    Strolling along the oldest street in America

    by Bavavia Written Aug 6, 2008

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    Very nice activity on a spring summer or fall day..to see the beautiful old houses where people still live to this day..

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