Independence - Carpenter's Hall, Philadelphia

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  • Independence Hall
    Independence Hall
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    view from Independence Hall
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    Carpenters' Hall
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  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    Carpenters' Hall

    by Tom_Fields Written Aug 23, 2007

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    The Carpenters' Hall
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    This has been the home of the The Carpenters' Company of the City and County of Philadelphia since 1770. It's the oldest trade guild in America. During the Revolution, they sided with the rebels. This hall hosted the Continental Congress in 1774, and later served as home to the First and Second Banks of the United States. It once housed the American Philosophical Society.

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    Independence Hall

    by Tom_Fields Written Aug 23, 2007

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    Independence Hall
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    The most historic building in the US, and one of the most historic in the world, this is the one thing that everyone should see first in Philadelphia. Here, on July 4, 1776, delegates from the thirteen American colonies met and signed the Declaration of Independence. Its eloquent words speak to all people, and will endure as long as humanity does.

    In 1787, delegates met here again. This time, it was to create a new nation. When someone inquired of Benjamin Franklin what they were up to, he replied "A republic, if you can keep it." The Constitution, which they wrote here, has served us well. Ever since, it has served as a model for countries around the world. So far, we haven't done too badly with it.

    The building itself is a fine example of 18th century Georgian-style architecture. In its day, it was one of the most elegant structures in America.

    To visit, contact the toll-free number below or visit the web site to reserve a place on a tour. It's free, but there is a processing $1.50 fee.

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  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Independence Hall

    by machomikemd Written Aug 13, 2007

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    Front of Barry's Statue
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    Independence Hall is, by every estimate, the birthplace of the United States. It was within its walls that the Declaration of Independence was adopted. It was here that the Constitution of the United States was debated, drafted and signed. That document is the oldest federal constitution in existence and was framed by a convention of delegates from 12 of the original 13 colonies. Rhode Island did not send a delegate. George Washington presided over the debate which ran from May to September 1787. The draft comprising a preamble and seven Articles, was submitted to all thirteen states and was to take effect when ratified by nine states. On June 21, 1788, New Hampshire, the ninth state, approved it and it became effective in March 1789.

    Independence Hall is a U.S. national landmark located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on Chestnut Street between 5th and 6th Streets. Known primarily as the location where the Declaration of Independence was debated and adopted, the building was completed in 1753 as the Pennsylvania State House for the Province of Pennsylvania. It became the meeting place of the Second Continental Congress during the American Revolution. The Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and United States Constitution were all signed at Independence Hall. The building is now part of the larger Independence National Historical Park and listed as a World Heritage Site.

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    Independence Hall

    by machomikemd Written Aug 13, 2007

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    Front of Barry's Statue
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    Independence Hall is, by every estimate, the birthplace of the United States. It was within its walls that the Declaration of Independence was adopted. It was here that the Constitution of the United States was debated, drafted and signed. That document is the oldest federal constitution in existence and was framed by a convention of delegates from 12 of the original 13 colonies. Rhode Island did not send a delegate. George Washington presided over the debate which ran from May to September 1787. The draft comprising a preamble and seven Articles, was submitted to all thirteen states and was to take effect when ratified by nine states. On June 21, 1788, New Hampshire, the ninth state, approved it and it became effective in March 1789.

    ndependence Hall is a U.S. national landmark located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on Chestnut Street between 5th and 6th Streets. Known primarily as the location where the Declaration of Independence was debated and adopted, the building was completed in 1753 as the Pennsylvania State House for the Province of Pennsylvania. It became the meeting place of the Second Continental Congress during the American Revolution. The Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and United States Constitution were all signed at Independence Hall. The building is now part of the larger Independence National Historical Park and listed as a World Heritage Site.

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  • no1birdlady's Profile Photo

    Visit Independence Hall

    by no1birdlady Updated Mar 31, 2007

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    Independence Hall

    We had about 2 hours to go visit the historic sights in Philadelphia before our timed tickets for the King Tut Exhibit. So we walked down to the historic area to see Independence Hall where the Declaration of Independence first was adopted and the U.S. Constitution was written. We found out that you have to have a timed ticket to go into Independence Hall and then get into a long security line so we didn't have time to do any of that. So if you go here, plan to go early or reserve tickets in advance at www.recreation.gov for a small fee. You may visit all of the other sights without a ticket or reservation so that's what we did.

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    Freedom to Visit Independence Hall in 1969

    by grandmaR Updated Feb 28, 2007

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    1916 Postcard of Independence Hall
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    The post card was sent to my grandmother for a penny. [The other photos show my girls in front of Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell.]

    On the card is printed: "Independence Hall, fronting on Independence Square, between 5th and 6th Streets, facing Walnut Street. Built in 1729-35 by the Providence of Pennsylvania as the Colonial State House. In the foreground is shown the bronze statue of Commadore Barry."

    In 1969, it was pretty simple. We parked and walked in.

    Now according to the Independence National Historic Park NPS site:

    For entrance into Independence Hall, where the Declaration of Independence and U.S. Constitution were signed, you must have a tour ticket with a specific day and time. .... from March 1 to December 31, except for July 4th, Thanksgiving and December 26-31. Independence National Historical Park will be closed on Christmas day.

    Walk-Up Tickets are available for free on the morning of your visit at the Independence Visitor Center at 6th and Market Street starting at 8:30 AM. The first tour starts at 9:00AM. You may request tickets for any available time, on the day of the visit. You have the greatest choice of times if you arrive between 8:30 and 10:30 AM. During the busy season, tickets are often gone by 1:00 PM.

    One person may request up to ten (10) tickets for a family or small group. ... Everyone in the group needs a ticket, even infants.

    The Liberty Bell Center and the buildings on Independence Square, including Independence Hall, Congress Hall and Old City Hall require visitors to process through a security screening facility located directly across the street from the Independence Visitor Center. On busy days lines can be long, so .. allow enough time... There are no restroom facilities except in the Independence Visitor Center or those located on the corner of 5th and Chestnut Streets before entering the Liberty Bell Center. .. The Liberty Bell is on display in a glass chamber at the south end of the Center.

    You can also call and for $1.50 fee reserve tickets.

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Independence Hall

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Feb 4, 2007

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    The meeting place of the Second Continental Congress, Independence Hall was constructed from 1732 to 1756 to be Pennsylvania's State House. Many of the greatest moments of early American history took place in this fine building:

    In 1775, George Washington was appointed head of the Continental Army.
    In 1776, the Declaration of Independence was approved.
    In 1777, the design of the American flag was accepted.
    In 1781, the Articles of Confederation were adopted.
    In 1787, the US Constitution was finalized after the Constitutional Convention was held here.

    Independence Hall is the 4th most visited location (650,000 visitors) in Independence National Historic Park after the Visitors Center, Liberty Bell, and the National Constitution Center.

    Independence Hall is the only site in Independence National Historic Park that requires a ticket. Tickets are free if you arrive the day of your visit and pick it up, but if you reserve tickets in advance, they are $1.50 each (not covered by your National Parks Pass). You can reserve tickets at reservations.nps.gov and pick up your tickets at Independence Visitor Center (6th and Market streets). Tickets are required from March through December. Any time throughout the year you can attempt to get tickets for a same-day tour, but in the summer tickets are usually gone around noon.

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    Cradle of Liberty

    by Sue08080 Written Jan 27, 2007

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    inside Independence Hall
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    It is awe inspiring to visit Independence Hall and stand in the very place that our country was born. Start with the plaques on the sidewalk in front of the building, marking places where Lincoln and Kennedy once stood. Then move inside to see where Washington and Jefferson sat. Climb the staircase holding the handrail that Benjamin Franklin held. Touch history with your own hand.

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  • VeronicaG's Profile Photo

    The oldest trade guild in America

    by VeronicaG Updated Jan 7, 2007

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    Carpenter's Hall, Philadelphia

    Carpenters Hall, built in 1774, has been owned and operated by the oldest trade guild in America--the Carpenters' Company of Philadelphia. The architecture is in the Georgian style.

    This building has been the site of the First Continental Congress; formerly housed Benjamin Franklin's Library Company and was the location for the First and Second Banks of America. It is considered part of Independence Hall.

    Hours are daily 10 am-4 pm (except Mondays); In January and February it is closed Mondays and Tuesdays. There is no charge.

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    The Declaration of Independence and Constitution

    by VeronicaG Updated Jan 7, 2007

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    Independence Hall-Birthplace of Patriot's
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    Independence Hall is the birthplace of not only the Declaration of Independence, but the American constitution as well. You'll see the room where representatives met at risk of death to form a country independent of British rule.

    A draft of the historic Declaration of Independence and the actual inkstand used in the signing are displayed at the Hall. When you visit, you can see where each representative sat--the room just exudes history and drama!

    There are free tickets at the Independence Visitor Center, but for $1.50 you can get a ticket that allows you to enter at a particular time which may help you avoid a long line. Independence Hall is open daily from 9 am-5 pm. Timed tickets are necessary Mar.-Dec.

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  • VeronicaG's Profile Photo

    THE INDEPENDENCE VISITOR'S CENTER

    by VeronicaG Updated Jan 7, 2007

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    Independence Visitor's Center

    The center has up-to-date information on museum exhibits, restaurants, hotels and other attractions. There is a gift shop and an outdoor cafe which is seasonal. Philly Phlash trolley tickets can be purchased here--a day long family pass is only $10!!!!!!!!!

    The center opens daily at 8:30 am (closing at 5 pm) and some tour tickets can be purchased here. ** This is where FREE TICKETS to Independence Hall can be obtained.** Call 800-537-7676 for more information.

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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    Independence Hall (Carpenter's Hall)

    by Martin_S. Written Jan 2, 2007

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    Independence Hall tower, USA
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    One of the most important historical places in US history, where Independence was written into law, where it was debated and declared, literally where it all began.
    Just standing in front of the table where this document was signed and imagining the debates that must have raged for hours on end between these men we call our "forefathers" today and they brought forth what Lincoln reminds us of in his Gettysburg Address.
    If you would like you can read about the Gettysburg Address here:
    http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/gadd/

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    The Independence Visitors' Center

    by ringleader Updated Oct 8, 2006

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    Independence Visitors' Center

    You really should make this center the first contact you have with Philadelphia for a number of reasons.

    First of all, it is like a gateway that gives you all of the information, orientation, and help you could possibly need to make your visit here a smoothly-running, well-prepared experience. Located at 6th and Market Street across from the Liberty Bell and six blocks from the Convention Center, it even has a bus stop practically in front of the building. There is also direct access to underground parking.

    It is an interactive visitors' center with touch-screen kiosks, video presentations, exhibits, and brochure displays. Historically-dressed characters are on hand to greet you and to answer your questions. Languages supported in the video overview are in English, Spanish, French, German and Japanese.

    Secondly, YOU'LL NEED TICKETS!!! You can order just about any tickets you need for your visit here; however, be sure you definitely get your FREE tickets in order to be able to see Independence Hall as you'll need tickets to fit in with the timed-ticket system they employed several years ago. The tickets are free and can be reserved as early as 12 months before the scheduled visit. (Phone # for tickets is 1-800-967-2283 from 10 a.m.-10 p.m. daily or visit www.reservations.nps.gov to reserve them online. ) Each individual may reserve up to 6 tickets. On the day of the visit, tickets should be picked up at the information desk of the Center. Walk-up tickets are also available 45 minutes in advance.

    Also, one of the most important piece of information visitors need to know is that this is also the place to get SEPTA's Day Pass for easy transportation across the city. This tourist-friendly pass is good for one day of unlimited transportation on all City Transit vehicles, plus a one-way trip on the Airport Line. Day Pass costs $5.50 and is obtainable at the Center.

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  • TexasDave's Profile Photo

    The Biggest Draw

    by TexasDave Updated Aug 15, 2006

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    If you're visiting Philadelphia chances are Independence Hall is at the top of your 'to-do' list, since it is the biggest draw. You can get your free admission tickets over at the Independence Visitor's Center and depending on the amount of people visiting that day, you may have to wait until later that day for your tour. Which i snot a big problem since there is so much to see in the surrounding blocks. Anyway, it is very informative and interesting to wonder around the different rooms and to see where George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, et al. actually sat during the Continental Congress is very impressive.

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Carpenter's Hall

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Aug 14, 2006

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    View through the keyhole
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    Carpenter's Hall was home to the First Continental Congress in 1774. Construction began in 1770 for the Carpenters' Company of the City and County of Philadelphia, and throughout its early years it was used for governmental functions, a funeral parlor, an infirmary, a British barracks, a bank, a music education center, a school, and an auction house among other things. Many dignitaries have visited Carpenter's Hall including Queen Elizabeth II, King Carl XVI Gustaf and Queen Silvia of Sweden, President Vaclav Havel of the Czech Republic, and President Kim Dae Jung of South Korea.

    During my visit, the hall was closed to visitors, but I got a glimpse of the interior through a keyhole on the back door.

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