Independence - Carpenter's Hall, Philadelphia

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    view from Independence Hall
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  • heitzenrater's Profile Photo

    SOMETHING TO DO AFTER A PHILLY CHEESE STAKE

    by heitzenrater Written May 23, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fun facts

    The basement once served as the city's dog pound

    The second floor was once home to Charles Willson Peale's museum of natural history.

    Some historians note that Ben Franklin would occasionally trip other delegates from his aisle seat.

    George Washington, knowing that his opinion would carry undue weight, contributed little to the debate over the Constitution.

    Even though the days were very hot in the summer of 1787, windows were kept closed so others could not overhear their discussions

    Construction of the Pennsylvania State House, which came to be known as Independence Hall, began in 1732. It was a symbol of the nation to come. At the time it was the most ambitious public building in the thirteen colonies. The Provincial government paid for construction as they went along, so it was finished piecemeal. It wasn't until 1753, 21 years after the groundbreaking, before it was completed. It was the original "Philadelphia lawyer," none other than Andrew Hamilton that oversaw the planning and worked to guarantee its completion. Hamilton had won renown for his successful 1735 defense of Peter Zenger in New York that was to become a freedom-of-the-press landmark.

    The building has undergone many restorations, notably by Greek revival architect John Haviland in 1830, and by a committee from the National Park Service, in 1950, returning it to its 1776 appearance.
    Independence Hall is, by every estimate, the birthplace of the United States. It was within its walls that the Declaration of Independence was adopted. It was here that the Constitution of the United States was debated, drafted and signed. That document is the oldest federal constitution in existence and was framed by a convention of delegates from 12 of the original 13 colonies.

    HOURS
    Independence Hall Museum
    Open All Year 9 am - 5 pm

    ENTRANCE FEES

    Admission to all sites in the park with the exception of the National Constitution Center is free.

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    Free  from the britts check out the bell also out of my picture barry it is what it is
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    Independance Hall

    by kazander Updated Apr 11, 2005

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    Independance Hall is right across the way from the Liberty Bell. You must pass through the security system at the Liberty Bell to be allowed over to that area.
    The tours are free and the wait is not that long. These buildings you travel through have been the settings for many important historical happenings. We sat in on a lecture in the room where George Washington relinquished the presidency to John Adams.

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    Independence Hall

    by dlandt Updated Apr 5, 2005

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    Free to the public, entry is only through the Liberty Bell pavilion, so you need to pass through security. This is a complex of buildings which are set closely together in Independence Park. The significance of them, is that they formed the first seat of US government while Washington DC was being built. Several important documents were created here, and it was here independence was declared.

    The guides here are really good, almost at the level of historians themselves. However, not many historians can interact with children so proficiently.

    When you go here, you will be given a tour of several buildings which will include not just the rooms, but also original documents, such as the Declaration of Independence and others. The rooms have been preserved or recreated to as close an approximation of how they would have looked in historical times as is possible.

    Trivia: The last official act of the United States government in this building was to authorize the creation of the navy. I joined 205 years later.

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    Independence Hall Area - On 9/7/01.. 4 days before

    by zuriga Updated Mar 30, 2005

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    Here's Independence Hall. The guided tour is interesting and only 15 minutes. Visit the nearby Mint and get some free samples. (Just kidding) Wander to Betsy Ross's House and Carpenter's Hall. A short walk towards the Delaware River and you'll see Society Hill. There is lots of shopping in that area, and the younger folks will enjoy South Street which is filled with fun food and clothes.

    I took this photo on 9-7-01. It was just a few days before I drove home past the World I Trade Center and the gleaming towers shining in the sun. I didn't know it would be my last look at them.

    We need to treasure these historic sights of the world. They mean a lot to freedom-loving people.

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    The Chair's an original

    by ChadSteve1975 Written Mar 11, 2005

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    The one thing I remember most about visiting this place was the fact the historians talked about how the chair was about the only original piece of furniture in the recreation of the declaration of independence.

    The tour here is well worth it. Only small but full of information for the history buffs and those wanting to learn more about the origins of the United States.

    Brings meaning to what do you get when you lock 12 people in a room... A constitution...

    Pity about the right to bear arms...

    The empty chair party....
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    Carpenters' Hall

    by smschley Updated Jan 31, 2005

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    Set back from Chestnut Street, Carpenters' Hall is one of the great treasures of historic Philadelphia. The Hall has been owned and operated by the Carpenters' Company of Philadelphia, the oldest trade guild in America, since 1770.

    Located in the hub of colonial and capital Philadelphia, the Carpenters often found themselves in the center of political activity. This building housed the seven-week session of the First Continental Congress that met in 1774. Why, one might ask, did they not meet at the State House (Independence Hall) just a block away? The State House was perceived to be a hive of Tory sympathizers. In fact, some members of the Royalist press even suggested that the necks of the Revolutionary insurgents "might be inconveniently lengthened" if they did not desist in their activities.

    Architecturally, the building is in the form of a Greek cross. The pedimented doorway with Doric detail is gracious and welcoming. Three Palladian windows line the second floor under which is stone balustrades. The belt course (band separating the floors) is unusual in that it is outlined in wood instead of brick.

    Today Carpenters' Hall is kept open free to the public. Over 150,000 visitors from around the world come each year to see this beautiful and historic building. Inside the Hall eight Windsor chairs used by members of the First Continental Congress are on display. Also displayed are early carpentry tools. Don't miss an opportunity to see a remarkable confluence of history and architecture.

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    Independence Hall

    by smschley Updated Jan 30, 2005

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    Construction of the Pennsylvania State House, which came to be known as Independence Hall, began in 1732, and wasn't finished until 1753. The building has undergone many restorations, with the latest in 1950 returning it to its 1776 appearance.

    Independence Hall is, by every estimate, the birthplace of the United States. It was within its walls that the Declaration of Independence was signed in 1776, the Articles of Confederation uniting the thirteen (13) colonies were ratified in 1781 and the Constitution setting out the nations's basic laws of the United States was debated, drafted and signed was adopted in 1787.

    Visitors are admitted free of charge by tour only, with tours beginning in the East Wing. No reservations are accepted, and all tours are operated on a first come first served basis. All visitors need a free timed ticket for the Independence Hall tours from March through December. To speed things up a timed and dated ticket system is now in place for tours of Independence Hall.

    There are two ways to obtain tickets:

    1. On the day of your visit, you may get "walk-up" tickets at the Independence Visitor
    Center.

    2. Visitors can reserve tickets as early as twelve months before their visit through the reservation system operated by the Spherix Corporation in Cumberland, Maryland. Spherix operates the National Park Reservation System under contract to the National Park Service.

    To contact Spherix for advance tickets:
    Call 1-800-967-2283 from 10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. daily (Eastern Time). You may also go to the web site: http://reservations.nps.gov to reserve tickets. Individuals may reserve up to six tickets

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    Priceless Artifacts of Democracy

    by cruisingbug Written Jan 25, 2005

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    Within Independence Hall, you can find a collection of the "tools of the trade" of democracy. Pictured at left is the Syng Inkstand, which was used in the signing of the Declaration of Independence. It is located in the West Wing, as part of the Great Essentials exhibit.

    The founding fathers of America must have known what they were doing was monumental to have held onto such a commonplace object.

    Syng Inkstand, Indy Hall, Philadelphia
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    Historical Philadelphia

    by asturnut Updated Jan 18, 2005

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    As the nation's first capitol and the home of the drafting of the Declaration of Independence, Philadelphia has a lot of historical sites and architecture of interest. I am going to list the best ones all together, since I think details about them have been covered comprehensively in many other sources on the web. Here's a list of the major historical attractions in Philadelphia. Any of them is worth a visit. Many of them are located all within the same area, so an able bodied adult could take a walking tour of the area and make a day of it.

    Benjamin Franklin is the singlemost important person to have ever lived in Philadelphia. Any museum or site that pertains to him is of interest. These two smaller sites are worth a visit:

    The Philadelphia Contributionship
    212 South 4th Street
    Phone: 215-627-1752

    and especially
    Franklin Court
    Located on the 300 block of Market Street.
    Phone: 215-597-8974
    Don't miss Franklin Court! There are several very interesting sites and museums here.

    Independence Hall-
    500 Chestnut St
    Phone: (215) 597-8974 or call (800) 967-2283 ahead for timed tickets to avoid lines
    Price: Free

    Liberty Bell Center-(not all its cracked up to be. HA!!)
    501 Market St
    Phone: (215) 597-8974
    Price: Free

    Carpenters' Historic Hall
    320 Chestnut St
    Phone: (215) 925-0167
    Price: Free

    Declaration House
    701 Market St
    Phone: (215) 597-8974
    Price: Free

    Old City Hall
    501 Chestnut St
    Phone: (215) 597-8974
    Price: Free

    Betsy Ross House
    239 Arch St
    Phone: (215) 686-1252
    Price: $2 adults, $1 children

    Elfreth's Alley Museum
    126 Elfreths Alley
    Phone: (215) 574-0560
    Price: Adults $2; kids $1
    (worth a visit to see the alley even if you don't go in)

    Liberty Bell in Phiadelphia
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    Independence Hall

    by DrexelDragon Written Nov 27, 2004

    If you have come to Philadelphia to visit, then you have come to the birthplace of my country. Please go there to understand our history regardless of young of a nation we are compared with the rest of the world. Our history is no more or less important than anyone else's, but it is unique. The US Constitution and the Declaration of Independence was most notably drafted here, and set the stage for democracy as we know it. Also a world heritage site and run by the National Park Service. See the link below.

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  • londonlover's Profile Photo

    Independence Hall

    by londonlover Updated Oct 28, 2004

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    The building where the founding fathers signed the Declaration of Independence in 1776. Just to think of all the huge historical figures that were together in this building is mind-boggling! Free admission.

    Independence Hall

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    The Birthplace of America

    by edachsund Written Oct 27, 2004

    Independence Hall is where the birthplace of the United States. It held in the Assembly Room that Thomas Jefferson's eloquent Declaration of Independence was signed in 1776 and later the Constitution of the United States was adopted and this is one of the Pennsylvanian's known landmarks.

    This is George Washington statue is stand proudly right infront oh the Independence Hall

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  • Independence Hall

    by dzni Written Sep 12, 2004

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    This is where the Declaration of Independence was ratified, if my history serves me correctly. It was one of the largest, if not the largest, buildings in the country at the time. Before the Revolutionary War, it was the Pennsylvania Statehouse. At any rate, I doubt a trip to Philly could be complete without visiting this important landmark of American History. You'll also find the Liberty Bell right next door.

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    Independence Visitor Center

    by tpangelinan Written Jul 28, 2004

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    If you are looking for something to do in Philadelphia and Old City you must come here first. They can customise tours for you and give you so much wonderful help, plus the visitors center has many displays and thing to do here. You will also find people dressed up in costumes of the Old Philadelphia times. This building is located accross from the Liberty Bell Center. Going here and talking with some one at the welcome counter can cut your wandering all over town trying to find thing, they will provide you with maps, tickets, what ever you need.

    Independence Visitor Center
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    Independence Hall

    by pmarshuk Updated Apr 13, 2004

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    The birthplace of the USA where the signing of the Declaration of Independence took place. Originally built in 1732 as the Pennsylvania State House for the English government.
    It is in the Independence National Historic Park right in downtown Philly.
    The picture was taken looking down from the Liberty Bell Center

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