Liberty Bell, Philadelphia

4 out of 5 stars 51 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Visitor Center
    Visitor Center
    by mindcrime
  • Liberty Bell
    Liberty Bell
    by mindcrime
  • Independence Mall
    Independence Mall
    by mindcrime
  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Liberty Bell

    by solopes Updated Oct 15, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Philadelphia - USA

    Yes, it is there.

    Yes it is broken.

    Yes it is well guarded, forcing us to the now common gymnastics of taking off belts, shoes, and everything suspicious or not. I know, that, despite having less than three centuries, it means, for the American, the same than D. Afonso Henriques sword for the Portuguese.

    So, my dear Americans, be prepared to strip if you come to Portugal to see the sword that is in... in... God! Where did they put the sword? Wait. Don't come yet. Or, if you do, try to see something else, while I locate the sword.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • TravellerMel's Profile Photo

    Ring the Liberty Bell - FREE

    by TravellerMel Written Jun 23, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Liberty Bell
    1 more image

    OK, you can't really touch it, but you can get pretty darn close to it and have your picture made with this American icon. The line to get into the building which now houses the Bell was wrapped all the way around, but moved quickly (I was inside in about 20 minutes). There are several alcoves with information about the Bell, and it's use as a symbol, etc, before you get into the last windowed alcove. The bell is behind a rope and guarded by an NPS ranger, but you can get remarkably close to it, and the famous crack.

    From the NPS website: In 1751, William Penn asked that the new bell being cast for the Pennsylvania Statehouse be engraved with the words, “Proclaim LIBERTY throughout all the Land unto all the inhabitants thereof.” The bell rang to call citizens to the first reading of the Declaration of Independence, and was later dubbed The Liberty Bell by abolitionists, who adopted the bell as a symbol of their fight for freedom for all Americans.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Liberty Bell- Symbol of Independence!

    by machomikemd Updated Apr 4, 2011

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Me at Liberty Bell
    3 more images

    When William Penn created Pennsylvania's government he allowed citizens to take part in making laws and gave them the right to choose the religion they wanted. The colonists were proud of the freedom that Penn gave them. In 1751, the Speaker of the Pennsylvania Assembly ordered a new bell for the State House. He asked that a Bible verse to be placed on the bell - "Proclaim LIBERTY throughout all the Land unto all the inhabitants thereof" (Leviticus 25:10). As the official bell of the Pennsylvania State House (today called Independence Hall) it rang many times for public announcements, but we remember times like July 8, 1776 when it rang to announce the first public reading of the Declaration of Independence.

    The Liberty Bell is perhaps one of the most prominent symbols associated with the American Revolution and the American Revolutionary War. It is one of the most familiar symbols of independence, abolition of slavery, nationhood and freedom within the United States, and has been described as an international icon of liberty. Its most famous ringing, though apocryphal, occurred on July 8, 1776, to summon citizens of Philadelphia for the reading of the Declaration of Independence. Previously, it had been rung to announce the opening of the First Continental Congress in 1774 and after the Battle of Lexington and Concord in 1775.

    open: 9am-5pm Tue-Sun; closed Mon

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • spgood301's Profile Photo

    A Crackin' Good Bell

    by spgood301 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Liberty Bell

    Here it is, the world famous Liberty Bell. What most everyone who comes to Philadelphia wants to see.

    Thing is, it hasn't always been called the Liberty Bell. Its original name was the State House Bell, ordered for the Pennsylvania State House in 1751. It was first called the Liberty Bell in the 1830's, by a group trying to outlaw slavery. Obviously, the name stuck.

    By the way, the famous crack didn't appear until the 1846. There's so much more to learn about the Liberty Bell. The best place to do so is in person. Admission to see the Bell is free, but you will have to go through a security check. My advice: go early and avoid the long lines.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • VeronicaG's Profile Photo

    The Liberty Bell Center

    by VeronicaG Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Liberty Bell

    The Liberty Bell--symbol of America's freedom--resides at The Liberty Bell Center! You'll find video presentations and exhibits on the origin of the famous bell in a dozen languages here.

    Here are some bell facts I obtained from the government website:

    A bell for the Pennsylvania State House was cast in London, England, however, it cracked soon after it arrived in Philadelphia. Local craftsmen John Pass and John Stow cast a new bell in 1753, using metal from the English bell. Their names appear on the front of the bell. The bell was repaired in 1846 and rang for a George Washington birthday celebration, but the bell cracked again and has not been rung since. No one knows why the bell cracked either time.

    The bell weighs about 2000 pounds. It is made of 70% copper, 25% tin and small amounts of lead, zinc, arsenic, gold and silver. It hangs from what is believed to be its original yoke, made from American elm, also known as slippery elm.

    DID YOU KNOW...

    **William Penn created Pennsylvania's government and allowed citizens to help make laws and gave them the privilege of choosing their religion. In 1751 the Speaker of the Pennsylvania Assembly ordered a new bell for the state House and asked that a Bible verse be inscribed:

    'PROCLAIM LIBERTY THROUGHOUT ALL THE LAND UNTO ALL THE INHABITANTS THEREOF" (LEVITICUS 25:10).

    The bell rang many times when public announcements were made, but in 1776 it rang for the first public reading of the Declaration of Independence.

    The Liberty Bell Center is open 9 am-5 pm daily.

    Related to:
    • Seniors
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    1969 Site of the Liberty Bell

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Daughters standing next to the Bell -1969
    3 more images

    Inscription "Proclaim liberty throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof - Lev. XXV, v. x. By order of the Assembly of the Province of Pensylvania for the State House in Philada."

    Almost every American child knows or thinks they know that the Liberty Bell cracked when it was rung to celebrate the signing of the Declaration of Independence.

    But.. The Liberty Bell was NOT rung in 1776 to commemorate the Declaration of Independence and its nickname was coined in 1839 referring to the abolition of slavery.

    Facts: A bell for the Pennsylvania State House (which is now called Independence Hall) was cast in London, England and it cracked. Local craftsmen John Pass and John Stow cast a new bell in 1753, using metal from the English bell. (Their names appear on the front of the bell, along with the city and the date.) It hangs from what is believed to be its original yoke which is made of elm wood. By 1846 a thin crack began to affect the sound of the bell. The bell was repaired in 1846 and rang for a George Washington birthday celebration, but the bell cracked again and has not been rung since. No one knows why the bell cracked either time.

    In 1970, Procrastinators' Club of America demanded a refund for the Liberty Bell from England's White Chapel Foundry because it had proved to be faulty. White Chapel's response? They graciously offered a full refund - provided that the item could be returned in its original packaging.

    Daily 9am-5pm with extended hours July and August.

    You can see a video presentation and exhibits about the Liberty Bell and the new Independence Visitor's Center which is part of the Independence National Historical Park. The Liberty Bell is now displayed in a "magnificant glass chamber with Independence Hall in the background." You have to have a ticket to visit it and you should allow 45 minutes to get through security. A far cry from when my children and I visited in 1969 and I could take their picture standing next to it in Independence Hall.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    Liberty Bell

    by butterflykizzez04 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Liberty Bell

    It was amazing seeing the Liberty Bell. It is housed in a building across from Independence Hall. You have to go through tight security check and metal detectors to get in there. Once inside the Liberty Bell building, there is alot of historical information and artifacts pertaining to the bell and making ouf the bell.

    This building is also free and they ask for donation as you leave.
    You can actually get very close to the bell itself but there is a guard nearby to make sure you don't touch it.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    Another view of the Liberty Bell

    by butterflykizzez04 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Liberty Bell inside it building

    A bell for the Pennsylvania State House was cast in London, England, however, it cracked soon after it arrived in Philadelphia. Local craftsmen John Pass and John Stow cast a new bell in 1753, using metal from the English bell. Their names appear on the front of the bell, along with the city and the date.
    By 1846 a thin crack began to affect the sound of the bell. The bell was repaired in 1846 and rang for a George Washington birthday celebration, but the bell cracked again and has not been rung since. No one knows why the bell cracked either time.

    The bell weighs about 2000 pounds. It is made of 70% copper, 25% tin, and small amounts of lead, zinc, arsenic, gold, and silver. It hangs from what is believed to be its original yoke, made from American elm, also known as slippery elm.

    *Liberty Bell Center
    9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • smschley's Profile Photo

    Liberty Bell

    by smschley Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    On November 1, 1751, the Pennsylvania Assembly ordered a Bell to commemorate the 50-year anniversary of William Penn's 1701 Charter of Privileges with the quotation "Proclaim Liberty throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof," from Leviticus 25:10

    The bell arrived in Philadelphia on September 1, 1752, but was not hung until March 10, 1753, on which day a crack appeared. Two attempts were made to melt and recast with the last one working on June 11, 1753

    Tradition holds, it tolled for the First Continental Congress in 1774, the Battle of Lexington and Concord in 1775 and its most resonant tolling was on July 8, 1776, when it summoned the citizenry for the reading of the Declaration of Independence produced by the Second Continental Congress.

    There is widespread disagreement about when the first crack appeared on the Bell. However, it is agreed that the final expansion of the crack which rendered the Bell unringable was on Washington's Birthday in 1846.

    The Bell achieved an iconic status when abolitionists adopted the Bell as a symbol for the movement. It was first used in this association as a frontispiece to an 1837 edition of Liberty, published by the New York Anti-Slavery Society. . William Lloyd Garrison's anti-slavery publication The Liberator reprinted a Boston abolitionist pamphlet containing a poem about the Bell, entitled, The Liberty Bell, which represents the first documented use of the name, "Liberty Bell."

    In 1847, George Lippard wrote a fictional story for The Saturday Currier which told of an elderly bellman waiting in the State House steeple for the word that Congress had declared Independence. Suddenly the bellman's grandson, who was eavesdropping on the doors of Congress, yelled to him, "Ring, Grandfather! Ring!". This story so captured the imagination of people throughout the land that

    Was this review helpful?

  • DrexelDragon's Profile Photo

    Let Freedom Ring

    by DrexelDragon Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The bell was constructed to adorn the Pennsylvania State House (now known as Independence Hall), and its most famous action was for the reading of the Declaration of Independence on July 8, 1776. It also served as a cause for abolitionists during our bloody history to eradicate slavery as it was known then.

    The inscription on the bell comes from the Bible.

    "Proclaim LIBERTY throughout all the Land unto all the inhabitants thereof" (Leviticus 25:10)

    The bell was having a more protected and elegant home being built around it still at the beginning of this year. I have not been to it recently because of the construction, and it is a big tourist draw. My advice is to try and visit at off hours when the wait won't be that long.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • mccalpin's Profile Photo

    Liberty Bell

    by mccalpin Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Liberty Bell

    The Liberty Bell is a symbol of America. As the bell in the Pennsylvania State House, it was rung on many occasions, but none so important as the first reading of the Declaration of Independence on July 8, 1776.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • bct341's Profile Photo

    The New Liberty Bell Center

    by bct341 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    New Liberty Bell Pavilion

    The Liberty Bell's future home on 6th Street between Market and Chestnut Streets will provide visitors with a glorious view of Independence Hall. The thoughtful, angled placement of the Liberty Bell in a glass structure will make it possible to see Independence Hall against the sky rather than against a backdrop of 20th century buildings. The new Liberty Bell Center will incorporate three discrete but physically and thematicaly connected elements: a shaded outdoor arcade containing educational materials, an inside interpretive exhibit hall, and a new chamber for the Bell. In this new configuration visitors will have a chance to gain an understanding of the Liberty Bell's history and the many inspiring stories associated with it. The exhibits will be a fitting prelude to their personal and often emotional encounter with the nation's most recognized icon of freedom.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mindcrime's Profile Photo

    Liberty Bell

    by mindcrime Written Oct 18, 2010

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Visitor Center
    4 more images

    We got off at Fifth Street(at north side) and entered at the Visitor Center (pic 1) first to get a map of the park (Independence Mall) and our (free) timed tickets for the Independence Hall later in the day. We had about 3 hours for the tour in the Hall so we went first to check some other sites, and of course the best one is located just a few meters away from the Visitor Center.

    It’s the Liberty Bell of course. We went through the security check and approached the Liberty Bell (pic 2). There is always a guard next to it because some years before a crazy man tried to damage the bell. We got our pics of it and then spend some time in the museum where we checked old photos and general info about the Liberty Bell (pics 3-4).

    The bell weights about a tone and has a visible crack and that’s why all the souvenirs showing the bell are like broken ones :) It was first cast in London (in 1751), arrived in Philadelphia in 1752 and in the following decades it cracked, recast, cracked and recast again! Of course, it’s one of the most recognized icons in USA, most people know it because it rang to celebrate the Declaration of Independence on july 8, 1776.

    The Liberty Bell center is open daily 9.00-17.00 and there’s no entrance fee.
    Usually there’s a huge line waiting to get inside, hopefully we went there on a cloudy day when nobody else was around, so it was ok for me to see this cracked bell but as I said it’s a national symbol of USA. I was surprised that the bell is kind of small, I was expecting to see something big…
    Anyway, we got outside on the Independence Mall again (pic 5), we were a few meters away from Independence Hall

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • apbeaches's Profile Photo

    The Liberty Bell

    by apbeaches Written Jul 15, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The bell tower steeple of Independence Hall was the original home of the "Liberty Bell" and today it holds a "Centennial Bell" that was created for the United States Centennial Exposition in 1876. The original Liberty Bell, with the distinctive crack, is now on display across the street in the Liberty Bell Center. In 1976 Queen Elizabeth II of Great Britain visited Philadelphia and presented a gift to the American people of a replica Bicentennial Bell, which was cast in the same British foundry as the original. This 1976 bell hangs in the modern bell tower located on 3rd Street near Independence Hall.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • BorneoGrrl's Profile Photo

    The chime that changed America

    by BorneoGrrl Updated Nov 23, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The entrance

    The Liberty Bell was originally purchased from London and hung in the State House (now Independence Hall) steeple. It wasn't long before a crack formed on the bell causing it to be melted and recast twice before it finally stayed in the steeple. The final bell weighed more than 2000lbs and a visible crack can be seen till today.

    The bell tolled many times to call the Assembly together and to summon people together for special announcements and events, namely the reading of the Declaration of Independence on July 8, 1776.

    You can visit this famous bell at the Liberty Bell Center since it was opened in October, 2003. The center is open daily 9am-5pm with extended hours July and August. The bell is visible 24 hours a day.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Philadelphia

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

92 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near Liberty Bell
4.5 out of 5 stars
2 Reviews
0.2 miles away
Show Prices
Show Prices
2.5 out of 5 stars
2 Reviews
0.3 miles away
Show Prices

View all Philadelphia hotels