Liberty Bell, Philadelphia

4 out of 5 stars 51 Reviews

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  • kazander's Profile Photo

    Liberty Bell and metal detectors...

    by kazander Updated Apr 11, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Liberty Bell

    The Liberty Bell is a famous symbol of America's freedom. The bell was first cracked when it was 1st struck in 1757. Although it was recast a few times, it cracked at a later date, there are many legends and theories as to when this took place. The inscription on it reads "Proclaim Liberty throughout all the land unto all the Inhabitants thereof LEV. XXV X. by order of the assembly of the province of Pennsylvania for the state house in Philadelphia pass and stow MDCCLIII"

    Going to see the Liberty Bell is free of charge, however you do have to jump though a few hoops to get in. The Bell is fairly heavily guarded , you must pass through a metal detector like the ones they have at the airport, including x-ray belt for bags. I even had to take my belt off!
    Once you get past that and further into the building, there are displays giving the history of the Liberty Bell, The final display being the bell itself. There is a lovely view of Independace Hall through the large glass window behind it. It's quite crowded with tons of tourists getting their photo taken in from of the bell.

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  • ChadSteve1975's Profile Photo

    Don't drop the bell....

    by ChadSteve1975 Written Mar 11, 2005

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    roped off for the visitors own protection?

    The Liberty Bell is an extremely famous monument which has grown into a symbol of many a cause.

    Yes it has been the symbol of democracy, womens sufferage etc etc...

    You'll have to line up to have a look at this beauty.

    Interestingly they said the bell was only in service for a whille before it developed its infamous split.

    Goes to show back then then didn't make bells like they used to.

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  • The Liberty Bell

    by peach93 Updated Feb 1, 2005

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    Liberty Bell

    All of my life I had wanted to see the Liberty Bell. I had always imagined it as being in its "natural" bell environment, but it is in fact encased in its very own, heavily protected federal building. In order to get into this building you must first go into another building and wait in line to pass through an airport-style metal detector and bag check. If you set off the alarm they wand you. It is serious. After you pass through security you are allowed to see the bell which is roped off on all sides and tended by an armed guard. It was hard to get near enough to it to take a photo because there were so many Japanese tourists taking each other's photos in front of it, but I did it! Yayy for the Liberty Bell!!!

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  • edachsund's Profile Photo

    Liberty Bell

    by edachsund Written Oct 27, 2004

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    This is the Liberty Bell where previously having been in housed in Independence Hall for about 200 years and it was moved to its present site in 1976 for the Bicentennial.

    It was originally called the States House Bell until 1830s, when it was rename it to Liberty Bell.

    By the way, I managed to shot myself a picture although it's crowed of people. To get in here, I've been through the scanning process just like in the airport.

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  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    The Liberty Bell

    by keeweechic Updated Jun 27, 2004

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    The Liberty Bell has become a symbol of American Freedom. The bell hangs in the pavilion near Independence Hall which was its former home. Inscribed on the bell is 'Proclaim liberty throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof' (Leviticus 25:10)

    The bell was originally cast in 1752 and then recast in 1753. It broke the first time it was rung but that didn?t stop it being used for many years until it finally broke again and finally silenced after being rung for Washington's birthday in 1846. The strike note is E-flat and the bell's original weight was 2080 lbs.

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  • acemj's Profile Photo

    Liberty Bell

    by acemj Updated Jun 8, 2004

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    I think the Liberty Bell has finally found a permanent home at the Liberty Bell Center at Independence Mall. It has been moved around in a constant attempt to find the best place to display it and I think they've finally put it in a great spot.

    The famous cracked bell is inscribed with the following:

    "Proclaim liberty throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof - Lev. XXV, v. x. By order of the Assembly of the Province of Pensylvania [sic] for the State House in Philada."

    While this might be something that is more interesting and historically significant to Americans, I think it's message is for everyone.

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  • pmarshuk's Profile Photo

    Liberty Bell

    by pmarshuk Updated Apr 13, 2004

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    This was rung to summon the citizens of Philadelphia for the reading of the Delaration Of Independence. Now cracked and virtually unusable it can be seen in a special pavillion in Independence Park.
    The bell was originally cast in 1752 at a foundry in England. However it cracked on it's first ring and was recast twice more locally in Philadelphia to give the bell you see today.
    One story about the Bell that I like was that as a April Fools Day joke Taco Bell puit an announcement in the New York Times that it had bought the bell and were renaming it the Taco Liberty Bell.

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  • jltan's Profile Photo

    Liberty Bell

    by jltan Updated Oct 9, 2003

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    An American Icon and a symbol of universal freedom. The bell rang for the first time on July 18, 1776 summoning the US citizens to hear the very first public hearing of the Declaration of Independence.

    Let freedom ring!

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  • bct341's Profile Photo

    Liberty Bell

    by bct341 Updated May 5, 2003

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    Liberty Bell

    An international icon and one of the most venerated objects in the park, the Liberty Bell became a symbol of liberty because of its association with various struggles for freedom and not solely because of its association with the events of 1776-1787. It is irreparably damaged, it is fragile and imperfect, but (like the republic it symbolizes) it has weathered threats and has endured.

    It is recognized worldwide and is matched only by the Statue of Liberty for its association with the rights of humankind. After arriving from England in 1752, the bell cracked during testing and was twice recast by local workmen. It was rung to proclaim important public occasions in the state house (Independence Hall) bell tower until it cracked again, and over the decades its history became a blend of fact and fiction. The inscription on the bell, Proclaim LIBERTY throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof, contributed to its status as an icon.

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  • seagoingJLW's Profile Photo

    Liberty Bell

    by seagoingJLW Written Apr 5, 2003

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    Liberty Bell

    See the original Liberty Bell, crack and all, in its 1976 pavillion. It is on Market Street between 5th and 6th Streets. It is getting a new pavilion in the fall of 2003.

    Bell Originally Cast: Whitechapel Foundry 1752

    Bell recast: Pass & Stow Philadelphia 1753 and again later that year

    Bell owned by: The City of Philadelphia (not the Park Service)

    Pavilion Built: 1976

    Pavilion Architects: Mitchell/Giurgola Assocs.

    Tourism information: Daily 9am-5pm with extended hours July and August. The bell is visible 24 hours a day. 215-597-8974

    Strike note: E-flat
    [source: Charles Boland, "Ring in the Jubilee" ©1973]

    Composition: 70% copper, 25% tin, small amounts of lead, zinc, arsenic, gold and silver (a more detailed analysis is given below.)

    Bell Stats
    circumference around the lip: 12 ft.
    circumference around the crown: 7 ft. 6 in.
    lip to crown: 3 ft.
    height over the crown: 2 ft. 3 in.
    thickness at lip: 3 in.
    thickness at crown: 1-1/4 in.
    weight (originally): 2080 lbs.
    length of clapper: 3 ft. 2 in.
    weight of clapper: 44-1/2 lbs.
    weight of yoke: 200 lbs.
    Length of visible hairline fracture: approx. 2' 4" (this and next measurement made by Park curator Bob Giannini in 1993)
    Length of drilled crack: approx. 2' 1/2"
    yoke wood: American Elm (a.k.a. slippery elm)

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  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    The Old Liberty Bell Pavilion

    by keeweechic Written Feb 25, 2003

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    The Liberty Bell Pavilion was opened in 1976, in readiness for the nation's bicentennial celebrations. Every Fourth of July, the Liberty bell is rung, in unison with thousands of bells across the nation..

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  • shiran_d's Profile Photo

    THE LIBERTY BELL...

    by shiran_d Written Aug 25, 2002

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    THE LIBERTY BELL INSCRIPTION:

    PROCLAIM LIBERTY THROUGHOUT ALL THE LAND UNTO ALL THE
    INHABITANTS THEREOF. LEV.XXV10
    BY ORDER OF THE ASSEMBLY OF THE PROVINCE OF PENNSYLVANIA FOR THE
    STATE HOUSE IN PHILADELPHIA

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  • Nobbe's Profile Photo

    Check out the 'Liberty bell'...

    by Nobbe Written Aug 24, 2002

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    Check out the 'Liberty bell' at the Libery Bell Pavillion.
    The Home of the Liberty Bell, revered symbol of American Freedom. First given its famous name by 19th century abolitionists who sought to end slavery.

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  • sharkie's Profile Photo

    Visit the Liberty bell.

    by sharkie Updated Aug 24, 2002

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    Visit the Liberty bell.
    'Proclaim liberty throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof - Lev. XXV, v. x. By order of the Assembly of the Province of Pennsylvania [sic] for the State House in Philada.' Liberty Bell Inscription. In 1751 a new bell for the State House was ordered and the inscription above was ordered to be on it.

    The bell was first called the 'Liberty Bell' by a group trying to outlaw slavery. The group members remembered the inscription on the bell and used it as a symbol of their cause. The bell has actually been re-casted once since it cracked and after the re-casting it cracked again.

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  • hobanma's Profile Photo

    See the Liberty BellSince...

    by hobanma Written Aug 24, 2002

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    See the Liberty Bell

    Since 9/11, security has become very tight. The street between the bell and Independence Hall is now closed and the entire area between the two landmarks is now secure. You must go through security to see either sight.

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