Pittsburgh Transportation

  • Inside the Clipper Shuttle
    Inside the Clipper Shuttle
    by FatesWarn
  • Monongahela Station on the River
    Monongahela Station on the River
    by atufft
  • Mon Incline Descending Mt Washington
    Mon Incline Descending Mt Washington
    by atufft

Best Rated Transportation in Pittsburgh

  • VeronicaG's Profile Photo

    Fly In Style

    by VeronicaG Updated Feb 6, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Conde Nast Traveler has called the Pittsburgh International Airport #1 in the country. Twenty million passengers are served from this airport, which is sixteen miles Northwest of the city of Pittsburgh. U.S. Airways has its hub here and many other major airlines provide service such as Southwest Airlines, Northwest Airlines, American, United and Delta. The airport opened in 1992.

    The Airport Mall makes delays more bearable, as many upscale shops are located here with no problem finding restaurants or eateries, souvenirs or miscellaneous items. Shop until you drop, then shop some more!

    The airport is located in Coraopolis, Pennsylvania off Rt. 60, Exit 6.

    Pittsburgh International Airport Voted A Top Airport Mall Great Airport Shops Upscale Airport Shopping Many shops and eateries at the airport
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Seniors
    • Singles

    Was this review helpful?

  • flora1's Profile Photo

    The "T"

    by flora1 Written Aug 21, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The "T" is what we call our light rail transit. Unfortunately, it only runs from the South Hills into the city and back out again. It is important to note, however, that you can hop on it within the city triangle (between the rivers) for free. Once you cross the river, you pay! This includes the buses!

    Gateway Station
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Parklife's Profile Photo

    First time travelers to Pittsburgh

    by Parklife Written Jun 18, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There are typically two ways to get to Pittsburgh from the airport. One is to travel around the outskirts Moon township and Sewickly. It's offers less traffic and a scenic trip down a road along the river. But if this is your first time to town, drive your rental car, convince your taxi driver or get whoever is driving you to take you through the Fort Pitt Tunnel. It may be bumper-bumper, it's not much to look at on your way to the tunnel, but it is WELL worth it on the way out. Coming out of the city side of the tunnel is like being blasted into a picture frame. From claustrophobic tunnel walls to a view of downtown and the point, it is a site to behold. Obviously better at night, it is still a striking introduction to the city.

    Was this review helpful?

  • flora1's Profile Photo

    Color coded map

    by flora1 Updated Aug 25, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Visitors to the city often complain about the difficulty of getting around because of the odd shape of the city (a triangle!). There is a great color-coded sign system in place that lets you know where you are within the city. Each sign consists of a small color code, the area inside and outside the blue rivers. Below it is another color-coded sign to let you know where you are in the city, and any landmarks or points of interest nearby (marked with a "star"). This photo tells you you are at the Allegheny County Courthouse, and the sign is magenta because it is in the center of the city. They are very easy and informative to deal with.

    Getting around
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    The Real "City of Bridges"

    by Ewingjr98 Updated May 12, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    With three major rivers and numerous other creeks, streams, and brooks, Pittsburgh truly is a city of bridges. Research by the Carnegie Library counted 2,139 bridges (not including those under 8 feet long) in Allegheny County, covering almost every possible variety of construction types. This same study shows that the city of Pittsburgh maintains 130 bridges. Pittsburgh's oldest bridge is the Smithfield Street Bridge built in 1881, while some of its most famous are along the North Shore such as the Clemente Bridge (1928), the Warhol Bridge (1926), and the Rachel Carson Bridge (1926).

    When George Washington traveled this area with the British army, he noted "instead of pushing on with vigor...they were halting to level every mole-hill and to erect bridges over every brook, by which means we were four days in getting twelve miles."

    A quick bit of research shows that numerous cities claim the title "City of Bridges" including New York City with 2,027 bridges; Amsterdam with 72 historic bridges and over 400 total spans; Erfurt, Germany with 216 bridges; Chicago with 180 bridges; Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada even has rights to www.cityofbridges.ca but can claim only about 26 bridges; Cleveland which claims 22; Porto, Portugal whose website lists 6 bridges; Ottumwa, Iowa claims the title despite officially having just 3 bridges; Portland, Oregon; Lucerne, Switzerland; Brugge, Belgium; Oulu, Finland; Lisbon, Portugal; Glendale, CA; Berlin, Germany; Eau Claire, Wisconsin; and others.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • iamjacksgoat's Profile Photo

    Riding "The T"

    by iamjacksgoat Updated Sep 14, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The T is a great way to get into, out of, and around Pittsburgh. If you need to enter or leave Pittsburgh from one of its suburbs, The T is definitely your best bet. A two zone trip costs $2.60 on normal fare rates, $3.10 on peak fare rates. The best part is, The T is free if you ride it within the city (the "Free Zone").

    People with disabilities, people with children, and senior citizen get special fares on the T. Children (ages 6-11) and people with disabilities get Half Fare trips. Senior citizens always ride free.

    Im my experience, I find that the T is rarely crowded, and often a fun way to travel. Living in the suburbs of Pittsburgh, sometimes driving into town is the LAST thing I want to do. On the T, there aren't any traffic jams, road rage, construction detours, or potholes. I've never traveled on the T alone, but I've always felt safe.

    The T On the T Rules of the T
    Related to:
    • Disabilities
    • Seniors
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Pittsburgh's Three Rivers

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Jul 25, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers converge in Pittsburgh to form the Ohio River. The Allegheny River begins in northern Pennsylvania, enters New York and returns to Pennsylvania to drain almost 12,000 square miles of the Allegheny Plateau. The Monongahela River watershed covers over 7,000 miles of Maryland, West Virginia, and Pennsylvania and is one of the most industrialized areas of the US. The Ohio River begins in Pittsburgh and runs 981 miles to Cairo, Illinois.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    have D will travel

    by richiecdisc Written Jan 1, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Pittsburgh is well served by mass transit but we were on the tail end of a six month trip traveling around the US National Park system and to get all our gear from place to place, our car was the best option.

    D was her ever sweet self driving from Great Lakes Brewing in Cleveland to our friends' place in Pittsburgh which took 2 hours and was about 125 miles.

    Our friend drove us to The Church Beer Works in town so D got a night off as the designated driver.

    I drove the leg from Pittsburgh to my brother's house in Delaware which was 350 miles and 5.5 hours. It was the end of the drive "back east" though we would explore the NE for a couple weeks, visiting friends and of course, visiting a few brewpubs.

    The Church Brew Works had a few choices
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Budget Travel
    • Beer Tasting

    Was this review helpful?

  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Walk to the game

    by Ewingjr98 Updated May 30, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    On Pirates game days, the Clemente Bridge (6th Street) just north of the stadium is closed to cars and reserved for pedestrians only. This is a great way to get from downtown to the stadium after a nice pre-game dinner in town.

    Pirate Parrott downtown on a scooter Heinz sign

    Was this review helpful?

  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Monongahela Incline

    by Ewingjr98 Written May 31, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Built in 1870, the Monongahela Incline is a major commuter route for workers on Mt Washington to get to downtown. It rises 369 feet in elevation, giving superb views of the city, making the incline a favorite of visitors as well. Once at the top, you can walk along Grandview Ave where there are numerous overlooks high above the river. Continue walking and you'll hit the Duquesne Incline.

    The fare is $1.75 one way or $2.25 round trip. You pay at the top going either direction...just ask the attendant for a round trip pass when you pay. The incline runs on Mon-Sat from 5:30 a.m. to 12:45 a.m and Sunday/holidays from 8:45 a.m. to Midnight. The lower terminus of the Mon Incline is at Station Square.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Trains

    Was this review helpful?

  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Parking in Pittsburgh

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Jun 17, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The general rule when parking downtown is the closer to the US Steel Tower you get, the more expensive parking will be. For example, the Mon Wharf costs just $8 per day while the Mellon Square Garage will run you $14 per day. If you park in the private lot under the Steel Tower, expect to pay closer to $22 per day. Some downtown hotels charge upwards and above $26 for valet parking. The Omni for example, charges $26 for valet parking, but they park your car in the Mellon Square garage across the street, where you'd pay just $14 to park on your own.

    The Pittsburgh Parking Authority runs the public garages, lots, and on-street parking while various private companies also offer parking to the general public.

    Some of the best parking bargains in the Burgh are at Station Square, the Strip and Mellon Arena where parking is under $8 per day.

    Lots of parking around the igloo Historic Parking Lot in the Strip District
    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • Lhenne1's Profile Photo

    The "T"

    by Lhenne1 Written Jan 22, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Pittsburgh has a great light rail that is free to use within the downtown city limits. Outside of the city (Station square, sports field, etc) the fee is quite nominal.

    The T is clean and runs frequently. The longest we've had to wait has been about 5-7 minutes when we had just missed the last train.

    The structure of the fares can be found on the port authority's website: http://www.portauthority.org/PAAC/FaresPasses/Fares/Zones/tabid/107/Default.aspx

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Business Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Take the "T"

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Nov 21, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The "T" is Pittsburgh's light rail which runs from the area around Point State Park through downtown, then across the Mon to Station Square. From Station Square, the T splits, but the lines all run to the south. Between the 5 downtown stations, the T is free all day, every day. You pay upon exiting at Station Square. There is a fee for riding further, but I've never ridden beyond, so I'm not sure how it works! The cars are modern and clean...I saw no graffiti anywhere!

    The existing rail lines stretch 25 miles and the initial phases were complete in 1985. Plans are in the works for the North Shore Connector project which will provide service to Heinz Field, PNC Park and beyond. This line could be complete in 2010.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Fort Pitt Tunnel and Bridge

    by Ewingjr98 Written Jan 3, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    One of the most amazing views of the city is seen when entering from the south via the Fort Pitt Tunnel and Fort Pitt Bridge. As soon as you leave the tunnel you are greeted by an impressive view of the large buildings of downtown Pittsburgh's Golden Triangle. Passing over the Monongahela River, you'll see the stadiums on the left and Station Square on the right.

    Fort Pitt Bridge Fort Pitt Tunnel Fort Pitt Tunnel Fort Pitt Tunnel Fort Pitt Bridge from downtown

    Was this review helpful?

  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Pittsburgh Airport

    by Ewingjr98 Updated May 12, 2007

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The new Pittsburgh International Airport was completed in 1992 and is located 7 miles west of downtown. It was an innovative design featuring the first midfield "hub-and-spoke" terminal in the world. One of its selling points when first opened was the Airmall which offered prices equal to the stores in town and was a draw for shoppers as well as travelers, but it must've taken a hit with increased security after 2001. Pittsburgh is US Airways' main US hub, though with the America West merger, the headquarters moved to Phoenix.

    Free wireless internet access is available throughout the terminal.

    From downtown Pittsburgh take the Fort Pitt Bridge to Interstate 279 South then follow signs to the airport.

    The mid field terminal The airport from the air Pittsburgh Airport Midfield terminal Franco's immaculate reception

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Pittsburgh

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

23 travelers online now

Comments

Pittsburgh Transportation

Reviews and photos of Pittsburgh transportation posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Pittsburgh sightseeing.

View all Pittsburgh hotels