Bristol Off The Beaten Path

  • Lombard, & my crew
    Lombard, & my crew
    by Pawtuxet
  • Clark Vaughn House
    Clark Vaughn House
    by Pawtuxet
  • school turned unique home
    school turned unique home
    by Pawtuxet

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Bristol

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    MORE of... House Tour 2009

    by Pawtuxet Written Oct 1, 2009

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    House designed by Lombard J. Pozzi
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    I can't resist giving you more of the House Tour with all its joys.
    The mansard roof home (pic 1) was designed by my friend Lombard Pozzi, preservation architect. It was built on the site of the Sevenoaks carriage house which burned in 1980. The ten room home respects its important historical neighborhood, and has water views from 7 or the 10 rooms. Gothic inspired details of the porches derive from a Bristol estate built in 1848.
    The Franklin Street school (pic 2 ) was built in 1849 and was used by a group of World War I veterans as a Legion Post in 1919. Evantually the current creative couple converted the building into a single family home in 1998 and their furnishings/collections make it a delight to visit.
    My crew of house tourists is shown in pic 3... Lombard toured with us, which gave us the advantage of his extensive knowledge.
    Pic 4 is the stick style DeWolf-Guiteras House on High Street. U.S. Senator James DeWolf sold this house to his son ... along with Linden Place ... in 1834. (see other tips for Linden Place info) Originally a simple masonry Greek Revival residence, it was uniquely updated in the Victorian Stick Style in the late 1870's.
    Pic 5 brings us back to the portico at Sevenoaks....looking out towards the water...just a block from the famous Hereschoff Yacht builder's dock.
    I CANNOT TELL YOU HOW MUCH I ENJOYED MY DAY.

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    OLD SEAPORT HOUSE TOUR 2009

    by Pawtuxet Written Oct 1, 2009

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    Sevenoaks
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    Ten homes generously opened by Bristol home owners give a unique opportunity to glimpse Bristol's architectural heritage and spectacular waterfront location.
    Bristol was designated a 2009 Distinctive Destination by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. It's a town rich in history and community volunteerism spreading over 329 years.

    The largest home on the tour was Sevenoaks - 1873. Augustus Bourn founded the National Rubber Co. in 1865, producing rubberized clothing, boots, and shoes for Union troops in the Civil War. By 1870 he was Bristol's largest employer. Bourn chose New York architect James Renwick, designer of the original Smithsonian Museum in Washington, D.C., to design a romantic "castle". This Gothic Revival mansion with a slate roof has a picturesque variety of windows, twin turrets, iron roof cresting and grey granite wall.
    At one point the mansion was sold at auction, and many details were stripped for re-use as condominiums. After another foreclosure in 1991, a woman purchased Sevenoaks and began its restoration. Many of us breathed a big sigh of relief.

    As glorious as the mansion is...along w/ a stunning location overlooking the bay... the 5 of us who travelled together on the tour preferred the little Clark Vaughn House, 1819/2003. We may have been influence by the fact that my friend, preservation architect Lombard Pozzi did the modern day additions... but we were WOWed by even the oldest and tiniest room of this charming home. The housewright of limited means, built a modest story-and-a-half cottage incorporating some antique building elements, evident in the early paneling re-used to finish the original southwest part of the house. I wish I had photographed more of this little jewel, but at least I got some good shots of the abulous garden, pergola and stone patio which stuns you with its beauty as you step out of the back door.
    There was an old stone schoolhouse converted to a single family home where the owner had a great collection of 'war years' furnishings (another favorite among my group). Creativity was abundant in these properties. One owner had a 3rd floor suite w/ large bath overlooking the harbor and they placed the toilet right in the middle of the room!
    The last house had the best garage I've looked at in a long time. I would have lived in it. Scituated on a hillside which sloped to the bay... the sun sparkled on the water as we finished the tour at day's end. What a house tour! What a day! If you ever get the opportunity to do a House Tour in Bristol.. don't miss it. You will not regret it.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

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    Unusual kind of garden tour...

    by Pawtuxet Written Oct 1, 2009

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    Old World Garden Tour

    Bristol has become home to many Portuguese immigrants over the years. Some from the island of Madeira, Sao Miguel, or Bristol's sister city in the Azores, Lagoa on the island of Sao Miguel. The garden tour tells the story of their culture through their fruit and vegetable gardens.... their grape arbors, statuary, and their warm smiles mixed with pride. Some look at us as if we are strange to think it all so novel. For them, it is generations of tradition carried forward even if it must be accomplished after working in a mill all day. It has been a great tour, but even if there is no tour you can always visit Bristol and drive the side streets. You will be sure to see some of the gardeners and perhaps you will be lucky enough to find a stand selling corn, tomatoes and cucumbers. They don't sell their wine, tho. THAT stays in the family !!

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    • Eco-Tourism
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    Kiowa and Comanche cradles

    by Pawtuxet Written May 15, 2006

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    Everyday wear

    The exhibit is titled "Gifts of Pride and Love". This is a traveling exhibition organized by the Anthropology Department at Brown University. The Haffenreffer Museum is owned by Brown. It sits on over 400 acres of prime waterfront land in Bristol. Driving in to the museum is an experience in itself. Such lush virgin woods.....with white birch scattered amongst the spring greens.
    Take the time for this little museum that is quite off the beaten path. It isn't big or glitsy, but their collections are worth a look.
    The cradle pictured here would be for everyday....without the elaborate bead work shown in my other tip.

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    Extraordinary bead work

    by Pawtuxet Written May 15, 2006

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    enlarge to see detail of bead work

    At the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology you can see some of the finest bead work done by the natives of our country. Several tribes are represented and there are videos to watch in order to learn more about some of the customs. These cradles are featured in one of the exhibits. The beaded type would be used for "dress up" or special occasions. There is quite a system to it all.

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    BRISTOL's Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology

    by Pawtuxet Updated Feb 10, 2003

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    There are some amazing collections in this little museum at the end of a long wooded drive....overlooking Mt. Hope Bay. The Native American collections are exceptional. Beaded work and Hopi dolls such I haven't seen even at the Smithsonian. This photo is from a post card purchased at the museum. She's lovely, isn't she?

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    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits

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Bristol Off The Beaten Path

Reviews and photos of Bristol off the beaten path posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Bristol sightseeing.

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