Battery Park, Charleston

4.5 out of 5 stars 4.5 Stars - 26 Reviews

East Battery Street and Murray Boulevard

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Along the waterfront; the Battery, Charleston
    Along the waterfront; the Battery,...
    by spgood301
  • Along the waterfront; the Battery, Charleston
    Along the waterfront; the Battery,...
    by spgood301
  • 29 east battery
    29 east battery
    by doug48
  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Battery Park and White Point Garden

    by Ewingjr98 Updated May 5, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    To the Defenders of Fort Moultrie Marker
    4 more images

    Battery Park and White Point Garden offer views of Fort Sumter, scenic antebellum homes, and a number of historic monuments. Located at the southeastern point of the city, the area was established initially as Fort Broughton in 1735, later as Fort Wilkins, as a park in 1837, and it later became a Confederate artillery battery during the Civil War.

    Today the area is called White Point Garden and is known for the huge old oak trees, the bandstand and a number of monuments and memorials including cannons from the Civil War, the Civil War Torpedo Boatman Memorial, the Stede Bonnet / Richard Worley memorial, the William Gilmore Simms memorial ("author, journalist, historian"), the Moultrie Monument, the Confederate Defenders of Charleston memorial, the Defenders of Fort Moultrie monument, the USS Pringle monument, the Hurricane Hugo Memorial which lists the 26 Charleston residents who lost their lives in the storm, and the USS Amberjack Memorial (Still On Patrol).

    Was this review helpful?

  • doug48's Profile Photo

    edmonston-alston house

    by doug48 Updated May 26, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    edmonston-alston house
    1 more image

    this home was built by charles edmonston in 1825. edmonston made his fortune as a merchant and wharf owner. this house is considered one of the best examples of regency style architecture in charleston. charles alston, a rice planter, bought the house in 1838. alston added greek revival details to the house such as a piazza with corinthian columns on the third floor and a balustrade above the cornice. general p. g. t. beauregard CSA watched the shelling of fort sumter in 1861 from the piazza. general robert e. lee CSA also was a visitor to this home. the edmonston-alston house is owned by middleton place and is open to the public.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • VeronicaG's Profile Photo

    Battery Park--Distant View of Fort Sumter

    by VeronicaG Updated Sep 10, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    Battery Park* was just a hop, skip and a jump from our B&B, Two Meeting Street. From it's front porch we could see the park and the river beyond it.

    Those wishing to enjoy a morning or early evening walk would find themselves here, as some shade was provided and a nice breeze from the water brought some relief from the humidity. We visited in early September and the temps were still in the 90's, so any relief was appreciated!

    The park is dotted with tall trees, punctuated by a couple of historic monuments and affords a view of Ft. Sumter and the Sullivan Island Lighthouse. Also, a couple of the islands edging the city: James and Johns. Trendy Kiawah island lies off in the distance, as well.

    When the Yanks were coming, Confederates blew up their ammunitions in this spot to prevent these from being used against them, while spicier history tells of Pirates being hung here.

    *Known also as White Point Gardens

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Seniors
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    The Battery

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Feb 14, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Battery
    3 more images

    The Battery is a park at the end of Charleston peninsula that use to serve as defensive batteries to protect the city if Fort Sumter fell. Today it's a peaceful park with monuments reminding of its past use.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • spgood301's Profile Photo

    Chill out at the Battery

    by spgood301 Updated Jun 15, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    One of many monuments at the Battery, Charleston
    4 more images

    If you're looking for a beautiful place in Charleston to relax, try the Battery. It's a park at the very southern tip of Charleston. You can grab a piece of bench for some shade, see some of the best monuments to Charleston's past (and what a past Charleston has), and take a slow walk around Charleston's waterfront. See Charleston's southern architecture and lots of colorful flowers as well. Bring your camera - there are plenty of pictures to be taken. Spend a few minutes there, or maybe have a picnic under a tree. The Battery is the perfect place to chill out.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Houses on the Battery

    by LilaLinz Written Jun 29, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    One of the houses that's open to the public for tours on the Battery is the Edmondston-Alston House. It's a great Regency style house and the tours are operated by very nice and friendly guides. One of the tour companys in town, Original Charleston Walks, does a homes tour that takes you through this house and another historic home on Meeting Street, the Nathaniel Russell house. Other great houses on the battery are the Roper Mansion, a 500 lb. piece of cannon is lodged in the house's attic, notice the great rope design around the door.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • TheTravelingNerd's Profile Photo

    E. Bay Street & The Battery- A Must See!!!

    by TheTravelingNerd Updated May 7, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    THE BATTERY
    4 more images

    E. BAY STREET- Take E. Bay St. from Market St. down to the Battery. Along this road you will see Rainbow Row (a street of houses painted every color of the rainbow) and The Old Exchange Building. The Old Exchange Building hosts tours and has a dungeon underneath used in the Civil and Revolutionary War. This building is said to be very haunted and is usually a spot on one of the ghosts tours. At the end of E. Bay is the Battery and on your left is Charleston harbor where from its walkway you can see Fort Sumter (1st shots of the Civil War) and on your right are HUGE antebellum mansions. It's a Must SEE.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • TheTravelingNerd's Profile Photo

    Battery Park

    by TheTravelingNerd Updated May 7, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Civil war cannons and the gazebo
    3 more images

    At the end of the Battery is Battery Park. It's a cute park with a big white gazebo. Make sure you take a picture of you next to one of the old cannons around the perimeter of the park. Look out at Fort Sumter and stare in awe at the mansions next door.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Eco-Tourism

    Was this review helpful?

  • doug48's Profile Photo

    porcher-simonds house

    by doug48 Written Apr 14, 2007

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    29 east battery

    the porcher-simonds house was built in 1856 by francis j. porcher. porcher was a cotton broker and president of the atlantic phosphate company. the home was remodeled in the renaissance revival style by banker john c. simonds in 1894.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • doug48's Profile Photo

    john ravenel house

    by doug48 Written Apr 14, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    5 east battery

    this italianate mansion was built in 1849 by john ravenel. ravenel was a leading planter, merchant, and shipper in charleston. the italianate bracketed cornice, window cornices and arches were added after 1886.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • doug48's Profile Photo

    andrew simonds house

    by doug48 Written Apr 14, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 south battery

    this italian renaissance revival mansion was built for the banker andrew simonds in 1893. this home was designed by f.p. dinkelberg who later worked with daniel burnham on the design of the flatiron building in new york city. in 1909 the simonds mansion became the hotel villa marguerita. some famous guests include, henry ford, alexander graham bell, presidents cleveland, taft, and theodore roosevelt. the writter sinclair lewis finished writing "main street" while staying at the villa marguerita. today this house is a private residence.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • HotSpotJ's Profile Photo

    The Battery

    by HotSpotJ Updated Apr 8, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Battery Park
    1 more image

    The southern point of Charleston is the Battery Area, a tip of the city where ages ago cannons fired at British Ships as Naval commanders watched from balconies on many of the still standing houses here. One of the more beautiful streets in America, this preserved area is a photographers and historians playground. The White Point Gardens are a must see, along with the tip where Battery Park is... it is said that nearly 150 years ago the citizens of Charleston watched as the first shot of the Civil War was fired across the harbor... and that ghosts of Revolutionary Soldiers haunt the area today... this is a must see stop in this city for many, many reasons....

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • jasperdo's Profile Photo

    Wonderful Architecture

    by jasperdo Updated Sep 2, 2006
    The Battery
    4 more images

    As parks go, The Battery is nothing special. It has a gazebo and a few statues. You can find these in hundreds of other parks around the country. What makes The Battery so special is what surrounds it. Some of the most beautiful homes in the United States are within a few blocks of The Battery, especially East Battery Street. Block after block of graceful ante-bellum mansions. Most have full side porches and little gardens. It really is a treat to wander the streets that radiate out from The Battery.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    The Battery

    by Tom_Fields Updated Feb 10, 2006
    The Battery, with vintage cannons
    4 more images

    This is where rebel troops bombarded the Federal garrison at Ft. Sumter, forcing the troops there to surrender, in 1861. That began the Civil War (still known to some in these parts as the War of Northern Aggression or the Unpleasantness Between the States). Later, Union forces took the city after a hard battle, centered on the Battery.

    Here along the Battery, one can see Civil War-vintage cannons and memorials to the soldiers. By the way, locals pronounce it BAH-try (the BAH has a low sound as in the word "father").

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • The Battery

    by MandaJ320 Updated Mar 9, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Battery

    The Battery, also called White Point Gardens, is a park in downtown Charleston where the Cooper and Ashley Rivers meet. There is a beautiful white gazebo sourrounded by live oaks and palmettos. There are many statues and monuments, along with old cannons and cannon balls that kids can climb on. Also, there is a great view of Fort Sumter, Castle Pinckney, and the Sullivans Island lighthouse.

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Charleston

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

96 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near Battery Park
4.0 out of 5 stars
1032 Opinions
0.1 miles away
Show Prices
4.0 out of 5 stars
208 Opinions
0.1 miles away
Show Prices
4.5 out of 5 stars
323 Opinions
0.2 miles away
Show Prices

View all Charleston hotels