Fun things to do in Charleston

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  • Along the waterfront; the Battery, Charleston
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Most Viewed Things to Do in Charleston

  • grasshopper_6's Profile Photo

    Hunley Museum

    by grasshopper_6 Updated Aug 2, 2010

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    Being a history?maritime archaeology geek, a trip to see the remains of the confederate submarine "Hunley" was high on my list. The Hunley waged the first successful submarine warfare by sinking the Housatonic here in Charleston during the Civil War. The history of the Hunley and the extraordinary story of its recovery make it worth a visit.
    Not an all day affair by any means. Plan on spending maybe an hour or so.

    inside the Hunley (a replica)
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

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  • WILDEFLOWER's Profile Photo

    Riding or walking

    by WILDEFLOWER Written May 20, 2010

    The ghost tour was fun! Poogans Porch was a nice place to eat. Bring a camera. One of my favorite things to do was the carriage ride. It took you all over downtown. Then we could kinda decide where we wanted to walk from there.

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    Take a Walk on the Beach

    by riorich55 Updated Apr 4, 2010

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    "Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take but by the moments that take our breath away." Here is an example of one of those moments - Sunrise Over Folly Beach Travelogue or check out the You Tube Video of the Sunrise here (sorry You Tube took off the music).

    We took this photo above as we walked down Folly Beach after watching the sunset. There was a band called NeedToBreathe putting together a video and they were obviously on a break when I took this shot on the beach. We stayed around for a little while watching them film the video, but if you have ever seen a video or film shoot there is a lot of down time so after we took a couple of pictures and some video we left to go have breakfast.

    Alright, Who Left This on the Beach?
    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Budget Travel

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  • Inna_S's Profile Photo

    East Battery and East Bay Streets

    by Inna_S Updated Oct 4, 2009

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    East Battery street starts at the southeastern tip of the historic city. Its southernmost portion is a boardwalk from which you get a view of Charleston Harbor to your right and a great view of elaborate mansions to your left. Once the street veers from the water its name changes to East Bay Street and if you follow it, you'll get to Rainbow Row, the famed block of painted houses that adorn so many souvenir items. Walking on these streets allows you to see the many architectural styles of Charleston.

    looking south on east battery street Rainbow Row Houses on East Bay Street
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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  • Charleston Self Guided Walking Tour

    by ksimms Written Sep 27, 2009

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    If you've never visited Charleston then walking the historic district is a must. This is where the Battery, house mansions and museums, Rainbow Row, White Point Gardens, the famous Churches (St. Michaels, St. Phillips and French Hugenot Church) the Market, King Street and much more.

    To see all of these landmarks and more, The Charleston (Self-Guided) Walking Tour includes a route map with 100 numbered points-of-interest, color and vintage photos. It's 28 pages and is 4.5 x 11" (tall and slim). To get a hard-copy it's only $5.95 and you can also download the digital ebook version and print it out yourself for $3.95. To see a list of where they are sold in town visit their website. Guided walking tours are $20 per person, with a self-guided tour you can go at your own pace and don't have to worry about keeping up with the group. Below are a few pictures of landmarks on the tour. Hopefully this helps and you have a great time in Charleston! The tour could also could be taken by bicycle or in a car serving as a driving tour.

    Cover Photo Photos of landmarks along the tour
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    The Powder Magazine

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Sep 18, 2009

    The Powder Magazine is a living history museum on the city's famed Museum Mile. Built in 1713, the Powder Magazine was the powder storage area for the small fort that was the start of the city. This structure served as a powder magazine from the time of its construction until around 1770 then again during the Revolutionary War. It has also been used as stables, a wine cellar, a print shop and now a museum. This is known as the oldest surviving public structure in the state and one of the oldest in America.

    The powder Magazine is owned by The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America in The State of South Carolina. Not really sure what that means, but it sounds cool I guess.

    Admission is $2 for adult, and it is also included in the $20 Museum Mile package.

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    Old Fire Watch Towers

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Sep 17, 2009

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    From 1887 to 1888 Charleston installed two huge bell towers that look like deer stands or prison camp watch towers that housed the city's automated fire alarm warning bells. These towers, along with the city's orphanage held three large, 2500-pound bells that were connected to call boxes throughout the city, replacing the original electric fire alarm system that was installed in 1877. The bells were in operation until 1953.

    The giant bell towers are located behind 5 Cannon Street and 112 Meeting Street.

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    Circular Congregational Church

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Sep 13, 2009

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    The Circular Congregational Church was built around 1892 and is sort of circular in shape, but more like a clover leaf. This is the third church on this site, and an earlier church was actually the "Circular Church." Designated a National Historic Landmark in 1973.

    The first church here was constructed in 1732 for the Independent Church. The second church on this site was built by famed American architect Robert Mills from 1904 to 1806. The second church burned in 1861, but the ruins stood until destroyed by an earthquake in 1886. The present structure used bricks from the ruined second church.

    The cemetery is the city's oldest with one gravestone remaining from the 17th century. This is a site of frequent lantern-light ghost tours, for just $18 a person!

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  • mpeagler's Profile Photo

    Sunrise & Sunset

    by mpeagler Written Aug 3, 2009

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    Do Sunset on Isle of Palms...it was so peaceful and just a few folks on the beach. We went down about 5pm as the crowds were leaving and stayed until 9pm (nightfall) It was gorgeous and peaceful. We spent the next morning sunrise....watching the sun come up on Sullivan's Island. It was great. Wonderful views and great place to walk the beach. Not very many shells though!!! But it was great!!!

    Sunrise on Sullivan's Island
    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Beaches
    • Photography

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  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Liberty Square

    by grandmaR Updated Jun 8, 2009

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    After you go to the Visitor's Center (which should be first), the next place you ought to go is Liberty Square - at least according to the National Park Service.

    Liberty Square links the NPS facility (the Fort Sumpter Visitor's Center which has boat access to the fort plus educational facilites) with the South Carolina Aquarium. Liberty Square also as provides a public park and pedestrian access area. I didnt linger here very long- it was too cold.

    They say "The garden rooms are reminiscent of Charleston's treasured gardens in its historic district. The design of the Square and facilities reflect a knowledge of and respect for site specific forces of nature without sacrificing human scale, historic compatibility or aesthetic quality."

    Liberty Square memorial fountain plaque Flag Familes in Liberty Square on a cold damp spring da
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • National/State Park

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  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    The Fighting Lady at Patriot's Point -USS Yorktown

    by grandmaR Updated Jun 8, 2009

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    The first time down the ICW, we stayed at the Charleston Harbor Marina which is actually at Patriot's Point right next to the state park which has the aircraft carrier Yorktown in addition to some other ships. We all toured the carrier and the submarine (we didn't have time for more because my DIL got lost and didn't get there until late).

    Bob was disappointed in the carrier because it was completely changed from when he served on it, and he said that the planes displayed on the deck were not ones that would have flown from the carrier. He was happier with the submarine (which he had also served aboard).

    Additional information on this Park is on my U.S.S. Yorktown State Park page

    Tickets On-Line..

    Adults (12 yrs.and older) $ 14.00
    Seniors and Active Duty Military w/ID $ 12.00
    Children (6 though 11 yrs.) $ 7.00
    Children under six with Parent FREE

    Hours of Operation

    Open Daily (except Christmas) Tickets sold from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm Ships close at 6:30 pm

    Aircraft Carrier Yorktown being painted 2004 Sub from carrier deck Patriot's Point ships from marina 2003 Ships from marina 2004 Another view
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Museum Visits

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  • Bike Rental or Tour

    by ragebot69 Written May 6, 2009

    I wanted to see town and I didnt want to sit on a carriage with a bunch of random people, so I thought about renting a bike. After calling around the best rates and deal that I found was Charleston Cruiser Rentals. The bicycle shoppe in town was $10 an hour, but they did 4 hour rentals at $20 and full 8 hour days at $30. We ended up getting a 3 day rental for $45. They gave us a helmet, a lock and a self guided tour included, and they also delivered to our hotel for free. When my parents in law came to meet us for the day, they took the hour long rental with the free guided tour for $20 and loved it. Apparently the carriages run on a lottery system and not all of them get to see the battery area, but the bikes can, and you get exercise, and you dont have to deal with the smell. The guy who delivered our bikes pointed us in the direction in everything we wanted to see and we got to do it at our own pace. Definetly the way to go. We took bikes to dinner and everywhere we wanted to go. We will use them again next time too. Low prices and unbeatable customer service.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Cycling
    • Eco-Tourism

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  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    The Palmetto Fort

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 27, 2009

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    While there has been a fort here for 171 years defending the seacoast, the most important part of Fort Moultrie history was the first decisive victory in the American Revolution. That fort was hastily erected using palmetto logs. The fort defenders discovered that the palmetto logs just absorbed the cannon balls fired by British warships and rendered them harmless. Plus of course, the British fleet commander made a number of mistakes in deploying his fleet.

    The current fort is the third Fort Moultrie which was built in 1809. The exhibits in the museum cover the whole history of coastal defense in this area instead of concentrating solely on the Revolutionary War battle. When we visited there was a Civil War Reinactment, and those pictures are on my Fort Moultrie page. Note: You cannot get from Fort Moultrie to Fort Sumter

    Open daily, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.; closed New Year's Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day

    Seniors (62 and over): $1.00 Adults (17 and over): $3.00 Children (16 and under): Free Family: $5.00 Annual Pass: $20.00

    Bob and our son walking by cannons Story of the Revolutionary battle Fort from the visitor's center Civil War Encampment Picture of the Revolutionary Battle in Visitor Ctr
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park

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  • Charles Towne Pub Stroll ... A MUST!

    by PubStroll Written Apr 17, 2009

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    A great tour to consider. The best alternative to all of those hyped-up ghost walks. You will enjoy an entertaining stroll through some of Charleston's most historic taverns and pubs, while listening to unusual (but true) stories of the city's past. Your licensed tour guide will present dressed in period attire - very fun and very professional. This tour came highly recommended to us and we now know why. Save a few dollars and book ahead online www.PubStroll.com

    www.PubStroll.com
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Singles
    • Beer Tasting

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    Fort Sumter (1)

    by GUYON Updated Mar 29, 2009

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    The visit of Sumter was the second aim of our travel in Charleston. The first was the first submarine Hunley. I wished to see the place in which the Civil War began. I am sure there would be the Civil War without the Fort Sumter but History tells us the attack of the Fort by the Charleston troups was the spark which made explode the "powder barrel ".

    South Carolina withdrew from the Union but Fort Sumter had a Federal Garrison. Its commander (Major Anderson) decided to gather all his soldiers in the Fort which was easier to defend than the other fortifications even it was not completly finished.

    He refused to surrender and the Brigadier general Beauregard (French origin ?), who commanded the confederate troups in Charleston, decided to open fire on the Fort on April 12th 1861. After 2 days of siege, Anderson accepted to surrender.

    The Civil War had begun...

    Arriving by boat to Fort Sumter One of the Fort Sumter guns Fort Sumter National Monument Model of Fort Sumter The bombardment of Fort Sumter
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Seniors

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Charleston Things to Do

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