Fun things to do in Chattanooga

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Most Viewed Things to Do in Chattanooga

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    Bethlehem Wiley Church

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Apr 1, 2014

    Sunday March 31, Tony and I was taking an URBAN HIKE around Chattanooga and we ended up in the "FOUNTAIN SQUARE" district of Chattanooga. As soon as I saw this gorgeous old church, I had to stop. So Tony and I took advantage of one of the free parking meters in front of the church so I could take a few pictures of this Awesome building. Located in Chattanooga TN

    When I got home I found some history about the building and had to check it out. This is what I found out: History of the Church:
    Wiley Memorial United Methodist Church, now known as Bethlehem Wiley United Methodist Church, is a historic church at 504 Lookout Street in Chattanooga, Tennessee, affiliated with the Holston Conference of the United Methodist Church.
    The church's site was an important community center in the early years of Ross's Landing, before it came to be called Chattanooga. During the American Civil War, an earlier church building on the site was used as a military hospital and prison by the Confederate Army and later as a Union Army military prison. The building incurred major damage during the 1863 Battle of Chattanooga. In 1867 it was purchased for use by the first African Methodist Episcopal congregation in East Tennessee.[2]
    The church's current brick building, completed in 1886-7, replaced a building that was destroyed by arson. It was rebuilt though the cooperative efforts of the congregation's members.[2]
    The city declared the building unsafe for occupancy in 1978.[2] Money was raised to restore the historic building. Following restoration, which included installation of a new roof, sandblasting the exterior, and uncovering some of the interior woodwork,[3] the building was added to the National Register of Historic Places.[3] After the 1979 National Register listing, city officials allowed the congregation to resume its use of the church for worship

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    River Gallery Sculpture Garden

    by butterflykizzez04 Updated Mar 31, 2014

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    Sunday March 30th, Tony and I parked the car on 5th Street off Broadway and started our URBAN HIKE in Chattanooga...it was about 10:30am. FYI ; Parking is free on Saturday and Sunday at the meters

    We walked up to BLUFF VIEW area and enjoyed the amazing views of the Tennessee River and the gorgeous old homes and Art work in this ART District area. Just past the BLUFF VIEW Overlook and across the street from the Bluff View Bakery you will find "The River Gallery" This is an outside park and the gates lock at 10pm..You can stroll around this fenced in area and enjoy the pieces of art for FREE..there is a small brochure where you can learn more about the pieces.

    I took some amazing photos and the art district outdoor gallery is very peaceful and awesome!! A must if you are in the area...and go slow, truly look at the pieces and enjoy!!!
    Can't wait to take my daughter back here to enjoy it...she loves Art..

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    Second Presbyterian Church ... 700 Pine Street

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Mar 30, 2014

    Tony and I was walking around Chattanooga today, and I found this lovely old church on 7th Street. It was built in 1879..and is so gorgeous...

    History I found on the internet:
    Tony and I was walking around Chattanooga today, and I found this lovely old church on 7th Street. It was built in 1879..and is so gorgeous...

    History I found on the internet:
    Second Presbyterian Church is a historic church at 700 Pine Street in Chattanooga, Tennessee, affiliated with Presbyterian Church USA.
    The Gothic Revival building, designed by Reuben Harrison Hunt, was built in 1890. It is the oldest building designed by Hunt that is still extant in Chattanooga.[2] It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.[1]
    Since 1984 the undercroft of the church's main building has been used for a homeless shelter, operated as a cooperative project of Second Presbyterian Church and St. Paul's Episcopal Church. St. Matthew's Men's Night Shelter started as a winter-only emergency shelter for homeless men. It now operates year-round to provide overnight housing for men who are participating in a rehabilitative program, such as the program of the Chattanooga Community Kitchen.

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    Ross Landing

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 26, 2014

    Saturday, Feb 22nd, Tony and I went walking around Chattanooga. We parked across the street from Ross Landing and started there. It was such a lovely afternoon and many people were out enjoying the weather.
    The park was really lovely. I had to go home and research more about it's important history..so this is what I found out to share..

    Ross's Landing in Chattanooga, Tennessee, is the site of the original settlement of Chattanooga and is considered to be the embarkation point of the Cherokee removal on the Trail of Tears. Ross's Landing Riverfront Park memorializes the location, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
    It was named for John Ross, later (1828) principal chief of the Cherokee Nation. In 1816 Ross settled at the site along the Tennessee River above Chattanooga Creek and established Ross's Landing as a trading post on the northern border of the Cherokee Nation, across the river from the United States of America. Ross also operated a swing ferry across the river that was anchored on McClellan Island.
    In 1837 Cherokee removal to Indian Territory began, known as the Trail of Tears. The Cherokee were driven from their homes in several southeastern states and were relocated at various camps, including east of Ross's Landing, for expulsion to Oklahoma. The name "Ross's Landing" was changed to Chattanooga by American settlers who took over the land after Removal in 1838.
    Ross's Landing is memorialized at Ross's Landing Riverfront Park on the banks of the Tennessee River where the city of Chattanooga was established. That site was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.[1]
    A pedestrian path connects Ross's Landing Riverfront Park to the Tennessee Aquarium. A wall along the walkway contains an art installation that symbolizes the path that Cherokees followed on their forced relocation to Oklahoma on the Trail of Tears. Created by Gadugi, a group of five Cherokee artists from Oklahoma, the installation features seven large carved and glazed clay medallions set into the walkway wall. The medallions represent different aspects of Cherokee history, religious beliefs, and struggles with white settlers

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    Statues of the Four Seasons

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 25, 2014

    These four statues are located on the sidewalks of Chattanooga near the Bluff area in the Art District near the Market Street bridge. They are four beautiful ladies
    Dedicated in 2009 all by the same artist

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    The Passage

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 25, 2014

    ony and I was enjoying walking around the lovely city during this gorgeous day...65 degrees and beautiful..
    We happened across this lovely setting located between Market Street Bridge and Aquarium Building. It is quite lovely and peaceful location. A must to check out if you are strolling through town.

    The Passage is a pedestrian link between downtown Chattanooga and the Tennessee River and marks the beginning of the Trail of Tears. The Trail of Tears refers to the journey which forced the removal of the Cherokee tribes from Ross' s Landing in Chattanooga to Oklahoma. Some 4000 Cherokees died before reaching Oklahoma. The Passage is a permanent outdoor exhibit, with symbolism of the seven clans of the Cherokee Nation. There is a 'weeping wall' representing the tears shed as the Cherokee were driven from their homes and removed on the Trail of Tears. Seven, six-foot ceramic disks tell the story of the Cherokee Nation from hundreds of years of Native American habitation in the southeast. Seven, 14-foot tall stainless steel sculptures of stickball players will grace the wall facing the river, educating visitors about the game and its importance to Cherokee culture.

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    Chattanooga Riverfront Area

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 25, 2014

    Saturday Feb 23rd, Tony and I enjoyed the gorgeous 65 degree weather and cloudless sky.. We parked for $1.50 for two hrs at a riverfront meter parking and just strolled around the waterfront with tons of others enjoying the beautiful day.

    There were parents with baby strollers and dogs on leashes, older children playing and swinging. Some were even sliding down the grass embankments of folded out cardboard like make shift sleighs...it was fun to watch their enjoyment of the beautiful day.

    I really enjoyed this part of my day!!!!

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    Historic Fort Wood Page 2

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 7, 2014

    National leaders also left their mark on Fort Wood. Two-time U.S. Presidential contender William G. McAdoo built the frame house at 829 Vine Street in 1888-1889. In the early 1880s, McAdoo moved to Chattanooga to practice law and became prominent in the city’s professional and social circles. In 1892, McAdoo moved to New York City where he was successful in business and politics. He bought the franchise to build the Holland Tunnel linking New York City and Jersey City; the tunnel was later renamed McAdoo Tunnel. Under President Woodrow Wilson, McAdoo served as Secretary of the Treasury and Director General of the U.S. Railway Administration. In 1920 and 1924, McAdoo vied to be the Democratic Presidential candidate but failed both times to get his party’s nomination. He later served as a U.S. Senator from California and as chairman of the National Democratic Party
    Fort Wood was home to the Kosmos Women’s Club, established in 1892. Like many women’s groups in the late-nineteenth century, the Kosmos Club served as a forum for study, discussion, and support for philanthropic programs. Through voluntary women’s organizations such as the Kosmos Club, American women became active and influential in civic affairs long before the suffrage movement won women’s right to vote in 1920. The club’s original home as located at 900 Oak Street until the group merged with the Chattanooga Women’s Club in 1929. In 1952, the club returned to Fort Wood at 901 Vine Street. The Kosmos Women’s Club still sponsors many of Chattanooga’s cultural events and charitable programs.

    Today, the Fort Wood neighborhood gives a charming impression of cohesiveness through the combinations of late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century architectural styles. The tree-shaded streets, wide sidewalks, and uniform setbacks with raised yards and surrounding retaining walls add to the sense of architectural unity

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    Historic Fort Wood Area in Chattanooga, TN

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 7, 2014

    Fort Wood’s distinctive homes reflect Chattanooga’s unique heritage and the community’s evolution over time. The district is located just east of Chattanooga’s original 1838 boundaries; it was annexed by the city in 1851. The original “fort” was an earthwork stronghold constructed by Union forces in 1863 during their occupation of Chattanooga. Originally named for Colonel William R. Creighton, killed at Ringgold, Georgia, in November 1863, the fort was renamed after 1864 in honor of General Thomas Wood.

    Archaeologists and historians believe that the Fort Wood area still contains many hidden artifacts from the war years. The National Park Service placed war-era cannons at 801 Oak and 850 Fort Wood as part of its historical interpretation of the fort. During the late-nineteenth century scattered residential development occurred in Fort Wood. A number of residences from the 1800s still grace Fort Wood streets today. These older homes in Fort Wood reflect the charm and diversity of Victorian and Neoclassical architecture, fashionable styles in turn-of-the-century Chattanooga.

    Fort Wood exhibits a variety of architectural styles, including an impressive collection of Queen Anne-style homes. The house at 800 Vine Street is an outstanding example of Queen Ann architectural design. Described as “Byzantine Revival” when it was built, the house displays elaborate stone detailing and an asymmetrical arrangement of unique design features.

    Architectural styles used in the homes of important Fort Wood residents reflected their wealth and interest in the fashions of the day. Queen Anne houses are characterized by large porches, carved trim elements, decorated gables, and wood shingles in various patterns. This style in Chattanooga usually incorporates brick construction with porches or verandahs, projecting bays, and narrow facades. Victorian Romanesque buildings include stone surfaces, arches, and decorative tiles. The popular Tudor Revival style employed diverse combinations of brick and stucco, vertical and horizontal boards over stucco, steeply pitched gabled roofs, dormers, and external chimneys. All of these architectural styles, and creative combinations, can still be seen today in the homes in Fort Wood.
    Grand designs reflected the importance of local residents. The impressive dwelling at 801 Oak Street is one of the few surviving buildings designed by Samuel Patton, a prominent architect who designed numerous important buildings in the late 1800s, including the Lookout Mountain Inn, the Fourth National Bank, and the Temple Building. The Oak Street house was built in 1893 for Captain C. A. Lyerly, a prominent banker who served as an active land developer involved with the Lookout Mountain, Highland Park, and East End areas and the promotion of the Electric Street Railroad Company. In 1902, Lyerly chaired the host committee for President Theodore Roosevelt’s tour of Chattanooga.

    Between 1900 and 1910, Fort Wood became one of the most exclusive residential sections in Chattanooga. The installation of one of Chattanooga’s first electric streetcar lines on Oak Street in 1889 encouraged prominent citizens to take up residence in the newly developed area. Many of Chattanooga’s leading citizens built their homes in Fort Wood, including T. C. Thompson, Mayor of Chattanooga from 1909-1915; George Fort Multon, publisher and part owner of the Chattanooga News; and Samuel Read, owner of the Read House, an important Chattanooga hotel. Through architecture, these influential politicians, businessmen, real estate developers, doctors and lawyers left their mark on Fort Wood during its heyday from the turn-of-the-century through the 1940s.
    Thomas Clarkson Thompson, an important political and social leader, lived at 907 Oak Street (1898-1901) and 835 Oak Street (1902-1904). He also resided at a home at 854 Oak Street which was later demolished. Thompson came to Chattanooga in 1893 and quickly became a leader in the Tennessee Democratic Party. He served as mayor of Chattanooga during important periods of the city’s development. He led the successful campaign to convert Chattanooga to a city commission system, helped found the T.C. Thompson Children’s Home built in the 1930s, was a leader of Chattanooga’s Interracial Club, and served as a trustee at the University of Chattanooga.

    Samuel Read’s parents built the first Read House hotel in 1871 downtown on the site of the former Crutchfield House. In 1879, nineteen-year-old Samuel Read assumed management of the hotel. In 1926, he built the new Read House hotel currently listed on the National Register. In the district, Read constructed the Fort Wood Apartment Building, Chattanooga’s first apartment building in an exclusively residential section. The apartments offered modern conveniences, such as built-in refrigerators and jewelry vaults in every bedroom. The Fort Wood Apartment Building also provided some of the first efficiency apartments in Chattanooga, a reflection of the community’s changing residential patterns in the early twentieth century. For his own residence, Samuel Read built the house at 900 Vine Street in 1904. This building later housed the Senter School, one of Chattanooga’s oldest private schools

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    Tivoli Theater

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 7, 2014

    Welcome to the Tivoli Theatre
    709 Broad Street
    Chattanooga TN 37402

    Chattanooga is home to the Tivoli Theatre, a fabulous historic showplace known as the "Jewel of the South." For over 90 years the grand old theatre has entertained Chattanoogans, offering everything from silent movies to Broadway blockbusters.
    A Brief History...
    The Tivoli opened on March 19, 1921 following two years of construction. Construction cost was close to $1 million--a lavish sum for its day. The Tivoli's interior reflects the Beaux Arts style popular for movie palaces of the 1920s. Its high domed ceiling, grand lobby, crystal chandeliers and elegant foyer were designed to transport patrons to a world of richness and splendor. Designed by the Chicago-based architectural firm of Rapp and Rapp, the Tivoli was built to accommodate both silent movies and live stage productions, making it state-of-the-art for its time. More innovations followed. In 1924 a $30,000 Wurlitzer organ was installed. (For details about the Tivoli's Mighty Wurlitzer, CLICK HERE.) In 1926 the Tivoli became one of the first public buildings in the country to be air-conditioned. Also in 1926, Paramount Studios bought the Tivoli, making it part of the Paramount-Publix theater chain. -
    Throughout the 1920s, 30s and 40s, the Tivoli reigned as Chattanooga's premier movie and variety theater. However, with the emergence of television in the 1950s its patronage declined. Forced to close in 1961, the Tivoli narrowly escaped demolition. -
    In 1963, a grant from Chattanooga's Benwood Foundation allowed the Tivoli to reopen after a partial renovation. The Tivoli was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974, and was purchased by the City of Chattanooga in 1976 for $300,000.

    In 1979, the Chattanooga Arts Council (now Allied Arts) received a $25,000 grant from the Lyndhurst Foundation for a feasibility study on restoring the Tivoli to its former glory. It wasn't until 1986, however, that the State of Tennessee made $3.5 million available for renovation. A private campaign raised another $3.2 million, and the City of Chattanooga contributed $300,000.
    After a two-year renovation, the Tivoli reopened to rave reviews on March 29, 1989. In addition to a complete cosmetic overhaul, the Tivoli's technical improvements included new dressing rooms to accommodate up to 70 performers, new state-of-the-art sound and lighting systems, a hydraulic lift orchestra pit, and new "green room" and rehearsal facilities. Stage depth was increased by over 14 feet to meet the requirements of today's concerts and theatrical tours -
    From 1920s "picture palace" to community showplace for the 21st century, the Tivoli still offers Chattanoogans the finest in entertainment and cultural events. The Tivoli is the home of the Chattanooga Symphony and Opera Association, and also welcomes a wide variety of touring companies each year. With offerings from blues to bluegrass and classical to country; plus dance, opera and the best of Broadway, the Tivoli is at the center of Chattanooga's cultural life. Its elegance and intimacy have made it a favorite of audiences and performers alike. -
    The Tivoli Theatre, also known as the Tivoli, is a historic theatre in Chattanooga, Tennessee, opening on March 19, 1921. Built between 1919 and 1921 at a cost of $750,000, designed by famed Chicago-based architectural firm Rapp and Rapp and well-known Chattanooga architect Reuben H. Hunt, and constructed by the John Parks Company (general contractors), the theatre was one of the first air-conditioned public buildings in the United States.[2][3] The theatre was named Tivoli after Tivoli, Italy, has cream tiles and beige terra-cotta bricks, has a large red, black, and white marquee with 1,000 chaser lights, and has a large black neon sign that displays TIVOLI with still more chaser lights

    Reflecting the Beaux Arts architectural style prevalent in late 19th century and early 20th century America, the theatre contains a high rose-and-gold coffered ceiling, the original box office, a grand lobby with a white terrazzo floor inlaid with forest-green marble and music-motif medallions, crystal chandeliers, an elegant foyer, and red velvet-plush chairs.[2] The Tivoli opened on March 19, 1921 to a concert by the Tivoli Symphony, a screening of Cecil B. DeMille's 1921 film Forbidden Fruit, and a personal appearance by Forbidden Fruit's Mae Murray.[2] The theater served Chattanooga well for several decades as the chief location for stage and film entertainment in Chattanooga, but went into a steady decline as modern movie theaters started to appear in Chattanooga in the 1950's.
    The Tivoli was, at one time, owned by ABC and was later leased to Chattanooga as a performing arts facility.[2] The theatre was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in April 1973. The city of Chattanooga purchased the Tivoli in 1976 for $300,000 after the theater had been in disrepair for some years; Chattanooga's Department of Education, Arts, and Culture currently owns and operates the Tivoli.[3][4]
    In 1979, Chattanooga-based Lyndhurst Foundation gave a $25,000 grant to the then-Chattanooga Arts Council, which is now Allied Arts of Greater Chattanooga, for a feasibility study on restoring the Tivoli. Other grants for renovation included $3.5 million given by Tennessee in 1986, $3.2 million raised by a private campaign by Chattanoogans, and $300,000 given by the city government.[3]
    After the Tivoli closed on June 5, 1987 for renovations, which were directed by Robert A. Franklin, the Tivoli reopened on March 29, 1989 with a recital by Marilyn Horne

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    Montague Park

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 6, 2014

    Montague Park
    SOUTHSIDE
    Opening in spring 2013, the Sculpture Fields at Montague Park is a 30-acre oasis nestled in the Southside arts district with an iconic backdrop of Lookout Mountain. The goal of this park is to foster and encourage cultural creativity through monumental sculpture exhibitions, diverse recreational and educational offerings and above all, to be a welcoming, vibrant place of enjoyment, connectivity and transformation. Open from dawn til dusk and free of charge, Montague Park hopes to foster and encourage a creative and culturally attuned environment in and around Chattanooga, winning additional acclaims one of America's Southeast treasures.

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    Miller Park

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 6, 2014

    Miller Park
    CITY CENTER
    This city block size publicly owned and maintained park features a pond, waterfall, benches, staging area and landscaped design that provide a serene setting for an outdoor lunch or peaceful moment in the heart of downtown. Developed by the city as the first downtown park in 1976, the park and adjacent plaza are both named for Burkett Miller, a staunch advocate of downtown revitalization.

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    Delta Queen at Chattanooga

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 6, 2014

    The Delta Queen is an American sternwheel steamboat that is a U.S. National Historic Landmark. Historically, she has been used for cruising the major rivers that constitute the tributaries of the Mississippi River, particularly in the American South. She is docked in Chattanooga, Tennessee and serves as a floating hotel.[3][4]
    The Delta Queen is 285 feet (87 m) long, 58 feet (18 m) wide, and draws 11.5 feet (3.5 m). She weighs 1,650 tons (1,676 metric tons), with a capacity of 176 passengers. Her cross-compounded steam engines generate 2,000 indicated horsepower (1,500 kW), powering a stern-mounted paddlewheel.

    Location Coolidge Park Landing, Chattanooga, Tennessee
    Coordinates 35.0599°N 85.3086°WCoordinates: 35.0599°N 85.3086°W
    Built 1926, Dumbarton, Scotland
    Architect William Denny and Brothers
    Governing body Private

    he hull, first two decks, and steam engines were ordered in 1924 from the William Denny & Brothers shipyard on the River Leven adjoining the River Clyde at Dumbarton, Scotland. Delta Queen and her sister, Delta King, were shipped in pieces to Stockton, California in 1926. There the California Transportation Company assembled the two vessels for their regular Sacramento River service between San Francisco and Sacramento, and excursions to Stockton, on the San Joaquin River. At the time, they were the most lavishly appointed and expensive sternwheel passenger boats ever commissioned. Driven out of service by a new highway linking Sacramento with San Francisco in 1940, the two vessels were laid up and then purchased by Isbrandtsen Steamship Lines for service out of New Orleans. During World War II, they were requisitioned by the United States Navy for duty in San Francisco Bay as USS Delta Queen (YHB-7/YFB-56).[5]
    Three different United States Presidents have sailed on Delta Queen: Herbert Hoover, Harry Truman, and Jimmy Carter.[6]
    In 1946, Delta Queen was purchased by Greene Line of Cincinnati, Ohio and towed via the Panama Canal and the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers to be refurbished in Pittsburgh.[7] On that ocean trip she was piloted by Frederick Way, Jr. In 1948 she entered regular passenger service, plying the waters of the Ohio, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Cumberland Rivers between Cincinnati, New Orleans, St. Paul, Chattanooga, Nashville, and ports in between. Ownership of the vessel has changed seven times over the last fifty years.[8]
    In 1966, Congress passed the first Safety at Sea Law that would put the Delta Queen out of business. After consulting with attorney William Kohler, Richard Simonton, Bill Muster, and Jay Quinby traveled to Washington, DC, to save their boat. As chairman of the board of Greene Line Steamers, Jay Quinby testified before the Senate to ask for an exemption to the law.[9] Greene Line had to renegotiate the exemption every two to four years. The boat's Betty Blake Lounge is named in honor of the woman who rose from public relations officer to savior of the boat when Congressman Garmatz tried to block the 1970 exemption.[10]
    Thanks to the efforts of Betty Blake and Bill Muster, the Delta Queen was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1970 and was subsequently declared a National Historic Landmark in 1989.[2][11]
    One unusual feature of Delta Queen is her steam calliope, mounted on the Texas deck aft of the pilot house. It covers approximately three octaves, and was used to play the ship in and out of her berth while she was docking and undocking. The Master of the Delta Queen sometimes extended this courtesy to other vessels as well.

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    Chattanooga Market

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 3, 2014

    Today Tony and I went to the Chattanooga Market held on Sundays in Chattanooga,, and we were pleasantly surprised and happy on what we found. We have farmers market in Nashville, but not like this...This reminded me so much of a Market in Columbus ohio that I enjoy visiting when there...and I love this market..I am definitely going again!!
    We walked around and I took a whole bunch of pictures of the people, sites and artist on hand..The local markets with their fruits and veggies, the artist with their candles, lotions, jewelry and salsas...I had to buys some salsa after tasting about 10-15 different flavors at one booth alone..I also bought some bread from one baker and then some additional bread from another..also bought some fruit and veggies..and someone was selling some spices that they blended...had to grab some!!!
    We sampled some salsa, cheese, spreads, pieces of bread and cider..also some chicken taco chili and Tony had several Locally crafted and home brewed Ales..not bad..
    We had a nice afternoon.
    It was sunny and warm and crowded but the crowd was friendly!!!
    I can't wait to go back!!!

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    Chattanooga with limited walking

    by Arwsgirl Written Dec 14, 2012

    Point Park is easily accessible and if they can walk a short distance they might enjoy riding the Incline Railway from the bottom to the top of Lookout Mountain. There is a nice museum (http://www.battlesforchattanooga.com/open.html) at the top as well as Point Park, which has beautiful views. They might also enjoy the Tennessee Aquarium and the River Gorge Explorer (http://www.tnaqua.org/RiverGorgeExplorer/RiverGorgeExplorer.aspx) trip down the Tennessee River. The River Gorge Explorer is an interesting mix of history and wildlife.

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