Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park Things to Do

  • Monument of the 19th Illinois
    Monument of the 19th Illinois
    by mtncorg
  • Missouri State Monument off Crest Road
    Missouri State Monument off Crest Road
    by mtncorg
  • Missouri Monument at Bragg Reservation
    Missouri Monument at Bragg Reservation
    by mtncorg

Most Recent Things to Do in Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park

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    19th ILLINOIS REGIMENT - STOUGHTON'S BRIGADE

    by mtncorg Written Jul 8, 2014

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    Monument of the 19th Illinois

    This monument along the side of Crest Road remembers the actions of the 19th Illinois on 23 November when they were among the first of their brigade to reach the crest of Missionary Ridge around 4:30 pm. The monument is unique from other Illinois regimental monuments in that it is not the usual rectangle created out of Quincy dark granite. The funds for this monument were not provided by the State but by an individual – Captain David Bremmer, a post war banker. Included on the monument is a bronze bas-relief depicting the soldiers of the 19th – led by Bremmer – rushing the crest of the ridge and rallying around a flag.

    The 19th was originally recruited and drilled by John B. (Ivan V.) Turchin, who was formerly been a staff officer of the Imperial Russian Guards. He had help drilling the men from officers and sergeants from the prewar Ellsworth Zouaves, one of the most well-known antebellum militia units in America. Placed into the Army of the Ohio, the 19th so impressed the commanding general Don Carlos Buell with their drill prowess that shortly afterwards, Buell promoted Turchin to brigade command. After Perryville, the 19th was brigaded with the 11th Michigan, the 18th and 69th Ohio under Colonel Timothy R. Stanley – original commander of the 18th Ohio and also buried at the Chattanooga National Cemetery. Alexander W. Raffan took command of the regiment when their second commander, Colonel Joseph Scott, was mortally wounded at Stones River on 2 January 1863. Raffan continued to lead the regiment here at Missionary Ridge.

    The brigade they belonged to was a new organization after the Army of the Cumberland was reorganized following the grievous losses at Chickamauga. Stanley’s regiments were added to the regulars who had previously been led by John H. King. Most of the regular units had fought at both Shiloh and Chickamauga where they have monuments in their memory – they had fought a host of other battles including Stones River where a monument exists remembering the regulars as a whole unit. Stanley’s regiments have monuments at Chickamauga, as well. Here, the combined brigade was led by Colonel William Stoughton who had replaced Stanley when he was wounded on Horseshoe Ridge at Chickamauga. Stoughton had been originally with the 11th Michigan. He had been born in New York but was practicing law before the war in Michigan. In 1860, he had been a GOP delegate at the Chicago convention that nominated Abraham Lincoln. He would rise to the rank of brevet major general but would resign due to ill health – he lost a leg during the battle for Atlanta - in August 1864 returning to Michigan. He went on in postwar years to become the Attorney General for Michigan and then served two terms in the U.S. Congress.

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    NEW YORK STATE MONUMENT: IRELAND’S BRIGADE

    by mtncorg Written Jul 8, 2014

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    New York marker for David Ireland's brigade

    David Ireland was born, ironically, in Scotland. His family immigrated to New York when he was eight years old. Apprenticed as a tailor to his father in New York City before the war, he had been a part of a militia regiment known as the 79th Cameron Highlanders. With the coming of the war, the 79th was absorbed into the New York Volunteers as the 79th New York with Ireland serving as regimental adjutant to Colonel James Cameron. The 79th New York fought as a part of William T. Sherman’s brigade at the Henry House during the First Bull Run. Cameron – a brother of the Federal Secretary of War Simon Cameron – was killed during the battle.

    After the battle, many of the officers resigned while many soldiers mutinied claiming that they had only signed up for three months and not the three years that the army was claiming. General George McClellan quickly put down the mutiny sending the ringleaders off to the Dry Tortugas and taking away the unit colors saying the regiment had to earn them back. Only a lieutenant, Ireland led the men to a victory at a small ambush 11 September 1861 near Falls Church. The regimental colors were restored and Ireland was given the unusual honor of being promoted to captain in the 15th U.S. Infantry – a regular army regiment.

    He spent most of the next year acting as a recruiting officer working out of Binghamton, New York. Eventually, the governor named Ireland as the colonel of one of the new regiments – the 137th New York – that were being raised. The 137th went south at the end of September 1862 to join the 12th Corps which served as part of the reserve of the Army of the Potomac. The regiment fought at Chancellorsville and then at Gettysburg where Ireland’s regiment took a position on the far right of the Union line defending Culp’s Hill.

    With the Federal defeat at Chickamauga, the 12th and 11th Corps were put under the command of Major General Joseph Hooker and sent west to reinforce Rosecrans’ army. Ireland’s regiment was a part of Brigadier George S. Greene’s brigade. Greene was wounded at the Battle of Wauhatchie on 29 October as the Confederates unsuccessfully attempted to keep Hooker’s men away from Chattanooga. Ireland took over brigade command and played a leading role in the success at Lookout Mountain on 24 November helping to sweep the Confederates away – there is a large New York State Monument on the mountain remembering there.

    On 25 November, Ireland’s brigade served as a part of Brigadier General John W. Geary’s divisional push out of Rossville Gap along the west side of Missionary Ridge in the 12th Corps three-pronged attack: Geary on the west side, Cruft along the crest and Osterhaus on the east side to scoop up retreating Rebels.

    Ireland would go on to lead his New York brigade in the Atlanta campaign being wounded at Resaca 15 May 1864. He returned to lead his men 6 June and was with the brigade when Atlanta fell 2 September. Ireland had married shortly before his regiment came west on 26 August 1863. Sadly the marriage was brief as he died from dysentery on 10 September 1864 in Atlanta. He is buried in Binghamton, New York.

    This monument remembers the 60th, 102nd, 137th and 149th New York regiments who were with Colonel Ireland on 25 November. The 78th New York was also a part of the brigade, but they had been left to guard the brigade camp back over in Lookout Valley. Later in July 1864, both the 78th and 102nd New York were combined into one regiment. Each of these regiments are remembered by a monument at Gettysburg, as well as another brigade monument similar to this one over in Lookout Valley erected for their actions at Wauhatchie when the brigade was under Greene’s command – the 78th, 137th and 149th New York were present for that battle.

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    IOWA RESERVATION

    by mtncorg Written Jul 8, 2014

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    Placed along the east side of a sweeping curve as Chickamauga Avenue drops down from the top of Rossville Gap, the Iowa monument remembers the Iowan contribution to the Federal victory here at Missionary Ridge. Most Iowans fought here as a part of the Iowan Brigade commanded by Colonel James Williamson - 4th, 9th, 25th, 26th, 30th and 31st Iowa regiments. Other Iowan regiments included the 6th Iowa (Corse's brigade), 17th Iowa (Raum's brigade), and the 5th and 10th Iowa (Matthies' brigade). These men fought under Sherman in the actions up at Tunnel Hill where another Iowa State monument stands.

    Here, at Rossville Gap, the Iowan Brigade was part of Hooker's late afternoon push up Missionary Ridge, catching Breckinridge's left wing corps overextended. Only one brigade - Clayton's Brigade commanded by Colonel J.T. Holtzclaw - was defending. The 27th Missouri under Colonel Thomas Curley was the first regiment of Hooker's that crossed Chattanooga Creek and they attacked directly towards the gap. Divisional commander Peter Osterhaus then brought up his 1st and 2nd brigades - the 2nd was the Iowa Brigade - outflanking the Confederate positions. The Iowans went up the right side of the gap - today's West Crest Road - with the Rebels withdrawing outnumbered and outflanked. Osterhaus' division proceeded northwards along the east side of Missionary Ridge as Hooker brought his two other divisions up to sweep up the Confederate line from the south.

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    delong reservation

    by doug48 Updated Oct 6, 2011
    delong reservation

    pictured is the 2 nd minnesota monument located at the delong reservation. the delong reservation is the site of the battle between the alabama battery and the troops of union general turchin. there are no parking spots at this reservation but you can safely pull off of crest road to park.

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    peace monument

    by doug48 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    new york peace monument

    located on the grounds of point park is the peace monument. this massive monument was built by the state of new york in 1910. the statues on the top of the monument are union and confederate solders shaking hands.

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    moccasin bend

    by doug48 Updated Jun 12, 2010

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    moccasin bend from lookout mountain

    this is a view of moccasin bend section of the tennessee river west of downtown chattanooga. during the battle of chattanooga union general george thomas defeated confederate colonel william oates at brown's ferry at moccasin bend. this defeat opened up an important union supply line to the city of chattanooga.

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    cravens house

    by doug48 Updated Sep 20, 2009

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    cravens house

    cravens house is located about half way up lookout mountain just past ruby falls on scenic hwy. this historic home was originally built by robert cravens in 1855. during the second battle of chattanooga the cravens house was an observation post and headquarters for both the union and confederacy. on a foggy day on november 24 th 1863 the forces of union general joseph hooker took this location in what is known as "the battle above the clouds". union troops destroyed the cravens house after the battle and cravens returned to the site after the civil war and rebuilt the house that you see today.

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    phelps monument

    by doug48 Updated Sep 20, 2009

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    phelps monument

    located just south of the sherman reservation is the phelps monument. colonel e. h. phelps was wounded here during the battle of missionary ridge. in the back ground of the picture you can see lookout mountain in the distance. this is a very difficult monument to photograph. there is no parking near the monument and you must find a side street off crest road to park. in this area do not park on crest road due to heavy traffic and lack of parking spots.

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    battle of chickamauga

    by doug48 Updated Sep 20, 2009

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    site of the battle of snodgrass hill
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    in my opinion to truly understand the second battle of chattanooga you should visit the chickamauga battle site in georgia first. in september of 1863 the confederate forces under the command of general james longstreet defeated the forces of union general william rosecrans. the turing point for the confederates was the battle of snodgass hill. rosecrans was forced to retreat towards chattanooga and was pursued by the army of confederate general braxton bragg. this defeat allowed bragg to set up confederate positions on lookout mountain and missionary ridge which was the basis of the second battle of chattanooga.

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    turchin reservation

    by doug48 Updated Sep 20, 2009
    turchin reservation

    the turchin reservation is near where union general george thomas charged the confederate line on missionary ridge. this attack broke the confederate line and forced general braxton bragg to withdrawl to dalton georgia. the battle of missionary ridge concluded the second battle of chattanooga. the turchin reservation has a small parking area.

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    sherman reservation

    by doug48 Written Sep 20, 2009

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    sherman reservation

    the sherman reservation is the site where union general william t. sherman attacked general braggs right flank on missionary ridge. the confederates repulsed the attack and sherman was forced to withdrawl. later general george thomas attacked the confederate line further south along the ridge and defeated the confederates. to visit the reservation you can park on a side street near the site.

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    point park

    by doug48 Updated Sep 19, 2009

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    point park entrance

    originally called lookout point, point park is located on the top of lookout mountain. at the park you can get spectacular views of chattanooga and get an impression of this strategic confederate position. point park is part of chickamauga chattanooga national military park.

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    battle of chattanooga museum

    by doug48 Written Sep 19, 2009

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    battle of chattanooga museum

    the battle of chattanooga museum is a good first stop on a visit to lookout mountain. this small museum and gift shop has a topographical map and uses miniture solders to explain the battle. a good place to orientate yourself to find the historic battle sites in the chattanooga area.

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    The Centerpiece

    by mrclay2000 Written Feb 25, 2003

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    New York monument

    The New York monument is the centerpiece of the Point Park section of Chickamauga/Chattanooga. The rest of the prominence is encircled with field pieces. With the trees situated as they are, a good unobstructed view of the monument is nearly impossible.

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    Cannon overlooking the river

    by mrclay2000 Written Feb 25, 2003

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    cannon overlooking Tennessee River

    The true interest for Point Park and the Lookout Mountain Civil War displays is the position of the armaments with respect to the Tennessee River and modern-day Chattanooga. Coined at the time of the fighting as the "Battle Above the Clouds" (the Point Park museum has a pavilion devoted to this idea), you can see first-hand the relative positions from above and below by standing on the cliffs where the cannon now stand.

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