Clarksville Things to Do

  • The Roxy
    The Roxy
    by TravellerMel
  • Things to Do
    by butterflykizzez04
  • Things to Do
    by butterflykizzez04

Best Rated Things to Do in Clarksville

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    Customs House Museum & Cultural Center

    by ocicat Written Apr 16, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Customs House Museum

    Built in 1898, the building was formerly the customs house and post office. The architecture of the building is wonderful. They say it's one of the most photographed buildings in TN.

    There are many hands on exhibits for the kids, and an 1846 log cabin that has been reassembled in the building.

    Top notch gift shop contains excellent examples of TN craftsmen work.

    Open Tues - Sat 10am - 5pm.
    Sun 1 - 5pm (Free admission day)

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    • Museum Visits
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    The Roxy Regional Theatre

    by TravellerMel Updated Jul 8, 2010
    The Roxy
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    A lovely little theatre with wonderful live performances. The shows I've seen here have been first rate, even though on a tiny stage in an intimate setting. "Of Mice and Men" was wonderfully poignant, and the recent "Forever Plaid" made creative use of their space while giving one of the best performances I've seen in a while. I love regional theatre - and this is a great place to see it. They offer a wide variety of shows, from musicals to comedy, to drama, to Shakespeare, to children's theatre. The most expensive ticket is $20 - seriously, $20 for a night at the theatre!

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    Customs House Museum

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 3, 2014
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    The Customs House Museum and Cultural Center is Tennessee's second largest general interest museum. It features fine art, history, and children's exhibits. It is located in Clarksville, TN's Downtown District on 200 South 2nd Street.

    The 1898 portion of the Museum was originally designed for use as a Federal Post Office and Custom House to handle the large volume of foreign mail created by the city's international tobacco business. It is built on the site of a former boarding house.
    The structure was designed by the Supervising Architect of the Treasury, William Martin Aiken, in the eclectic style popular to Victorian America. Aiken incorporated many architectural styles including Stick, Queen Anne, Italianate, Romanesque, Flemish and Gothic. Its highly pitched roof with large eagles on the four corners, steep gabled windows and elaborate terra cotta ornamentation combine to give importance to a relatively small building. Contrary to popular myth, the design was not inspired by the architect's visit to China.
    The building was constructed by Charles A. Moses of Chicago

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    • Architecture
    • Family Travel
    • Museum Visits

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    Montgomery Co. Courthouse Building

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 6, 2014
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    Tony and I went to Clarksville one afternoon. It was a Sunday so it was very deserted. We parked near the Montgomery Co. Courthouse building and decided to take a stroll around the town. Most people only walk around here during the work week, because the Main part of Clarksville is now considered near the mall or interstate..this is the older section of town..WHICH is always MY FAVORITE part of a town..To ME its the HEART and SOUL of a town..and I always gravitate towards it..NO MATTER what town I am in.

    I enjoy getting out and walking around. I enjoy seeing the Architecture of buildings. I am weird I guess because I pay attention to the arches, corners, window and door frames, the eves in the roof lines...cornerstones, etc...I am into it...lol!!!
    I think they are beautiful pieces of ARTWORK...does that sound weird? I feel the same way about old houses, tombstones in cemeteries..etc..

    Walking around the GORGEOUS building I took various pictures of the ARTWORK of the building..

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    Roxy Theater

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 6, 2014

    The Roxy Theatre is located in the historic downtown section of Clarksville, Tennessee in the United States. Standing on a corner of the Public Square it offers live theater shows to the public offering a wide variety of selection in the spirit of literary theater. The Roxy was built in 1947 after the 1913 Lilian Theater burned down in 1945.
    The Roxy has been used as a backdrop for numerous photo shoots, films, documentaries, music videos and television commercials; most notably for Sheryl Crow's Grammy-award winning song All I Wanna Do.
    Since the early 20th century, the corner of Franklin and First has been the anchor for Clarksville’s entertainment community. The Lillian, built in 1912, was the first theatre on this corner. Following a fire in 1913, the Lillian was rebuilt in 1914 and saw thousands of patrons enjoying first-run movies.
    Following a second fire in 1945, and with the advent of Fort Campbell, the Lillian was completely rebuilt and at last became The Roxy. A sleek exterior, featuring a new lighting called neon, beaconed movie-goers from miles around. Opening in 1947, The Roxy entertained Clarksvillians with first-run movies until 1980.
    The Roxy sat vacant for three years until Tom Thayer and John McDonald came on the scene. Opening on November 3, 1983, The Roxy Regional Theatre was reborn into a live theatre and quickly became “…the cornerstone of downtown re-development…”
    In 1995, a professional company was created in order to supply the great demand for Shakespeare, Greek classics, school curriculum and holiday shows, and to enlarge the Roxy’s outreach services to the community.
    The Roxy Regional School of the Arts was also born in 1995, offering teens extensive training in modern theatre as well as being able to work alongside professionals. The summer offers a joint project between the Roxy and the Clarksville-Montgomery County Parks and Recreation Department, offering teens a six-week drama camp for a nominal fee.

    Related to:
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    • Theater Travel
    • Architecture

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    Dunbar Cave State Park

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 6, 2014
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    Dunbar Cave State Park is a 110 acre (450,000 m²)[1] park in Clarksville, Tennessee, situated around Dunbar Cave. Dunbar Cave is the 280th largest cave complex in the world, stretching 8.067 miles (13 km) inward. In front of the cave entrance is a large concrete poured structure with three distinct arches. The cave is located in an area of karst topography, including sinkholes, springs, and limestone bedrock. The manmade Swan Lake also sits in front of the cave.[1] In March 2010 the cave was closed to tours and visitors because a bat infected with White nose syndrome was found in the cave
    History:
    The entrance to Dunbar Cave was inhabited by local prehistoric peoples for thousands of years before settlers arrived. These peoples also left enigmatic drawings on the cave walls, perhaps as part of religious ceremonies. By 1790 it had been claimed by Isacc Rowe Peterson, who subsequently left the area in order to prepare his family to move there. During his absence Thomas Dunbar also claimed the area and settled his family there. Upon Petersons return a legal battle ensued, with legal title to the land going to Peterson in 1792, although the cave retained Dunbar's name.[3] During the Mexican-American War, the cave was used to mine saltpeter for gunpowder. In 1858, developers saw the potential in the area, along with nearby Idaho Springs, and the first cabins were built there. After the Civil War, the springs and the cave were acquired by J. A. Tate, who constructed a two-story hotel on the site.[4]
    By 1931, the area had hosted numerous social events, including dances, concerts, and fairs, and was in need of repair and renovation. At the time, the state had just completed a new road in front of the hotel and an opportunity arose. A couple of local businessmen cleaned up the site, adding additional recreational facilities, including a concrete swimming pool, bathhouse, and tennis courts, and restoring and expanding the size of the hotel. The existing lake was also dammed up increasing its size to 20 acres (81,000 m²).[4]
    Dunbar Cave was purchased by Roy Acuff on April 26, 1948 for $150,000. (Nashville Banner, April 27, 1948) The cave was the site of musical festivities and entertainment shows, which would host big bands like Benny Goodman's and Tommy Dorsey's. Acuff also added a golf course adjacent to the lake. Over time the popularity of the cave and surrounding area declined, and the hotel burned in 1950 and was not rebuilt.[4]
    Dunbar Cave was purchased by McKay King in 1963. King operated the Dunbar Cave property until his death in 1971. The swimming pool was closed in 1967. The cave was inherited by his widow. (Matthews (2005), page 38.)
    In 1973, the State of Tennessee, under then Governor Winfield Dunn, purchased Dunbar Cave from Mrs. McKay King, to become a State Natural Area.
    In April 1997 two young women were found dead in the area of the park. They had been abducted the day before from work at a Baskin Robbins ice cream shop. The convicted murderer was Paul Dennis Reid who died in a prison hospital while awaiting execution by lethal injection.
    In 2002, the park shut down briefly during the state's budget cutting crisis.
    Petroglyphs:
    On January 15, 2005 park specialist Amy Wallace, geologist and author Larry E. Matthews, local historian Billy Frank Morrison, and history professor Joe Douglas discovered Native American petroglyphs in Dunbar Cave.
    The more than 30 drawings and etchings found in the cave were dated to the Mississippian era (700 to 1300 CE) using torches and other artifacts found nearby. Some of the pictographs are religious symbols, with one depicting a Mississippian supernatural warrior.[3] Their existence was announced to the public by the State of Tennessee on July 29, 2006, during the Second Annual Dunbar Cave Day, held at the Park.
    CURRENTLY CLOSED: 2010 to present
    Although Dunbar Cave only has a small bat population, it is still closed from November to March to allow the bats undisrupted hibernation. In March 2010, a bat with White nose syndrome was discovered by researchers from Austin Peay State University doing assessments of species diversity and roosting patterns.[2] Based on finding the infected bat, the State of Tennessee announced on March 24, 2010 that Dunbar Cave was closed to all visitors and tours were discontinued. Since 2006 when the disease was first discovered in New York, it has spread to Ontario, New Jersey, New Hampshire, and Tennessee, causing the death of over a million bats. The US Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) has called for a moratorium on caving activities in the affected areas,[5] and strongly recommends that any clothing or equipment used in such areas be decontaminated after each use

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    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park

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    See it on stage

    by ocicat Updated Jul 21, 2006

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Roxy

    Located in a historic movie theater (build in 1913), the Roxy stages plays from modern to Shakespearean. There are almost continuous productions.

    Related to:
    • Seniors
    • Women's Travel
    • Theater Travel

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    Statues on the Courthouse Lawn

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 6, 2014
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    While walking around the Courthouse lawn in Montgomery Co in Clarksville these are a few of the statues I saw and found interesting.

    Related to:
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    • Historical Travel
    • Photography

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Clarksville Things to Do

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