Franklin Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by TravellerMel
  • Things to Do
    by TravellerMel
  • Things to Do
    by TravellerMel

Most Recent Things to Do in Franklin

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    The Franklin Theatre - Movies, Concerts & More!

    by TravellerMel Updated May 27, 2014

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    View of the Franklin Theatre from the balcony

    A Franklin landmark since 1937, this beautiful theatre had closed it doors in 2007, due to the competition of megaplex theatres opening up in the nearby areas. Saved from demolition by the Heritage Foundation of Franklin and Williamson County, a non-profit group. After an $8 million restoration and three years of work, the newly refurbished theatre had it's grand re-opening on June 3, 2012 with much fanfare and ado. Area locals wax poetic about the regal old dame - my mother in law tells me she had her first kiss here!

    Since the reopening, the Franklin Theatre has screened current and classic movies (for only $5!), hosted a variety of concerts, and housed several stage productions. I finally got to see the new interior when my husband, MIL, and I went to see the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band. I loved the intimate venue - the frontmost seats are cabaret style, behind which are the traditional theatre seats, and a balcony. We sat in the front row of the balcony and it was wonderful - with ample legroom (or dance space, as the occasion allows!). Since then, we have seen a stage production of "My Fair Lady", the Desert Rose Band, Suzy Bogguss, and Kathy Mattea in concert, and several movies - I love this theatre!

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    Winstead Hill Civil War Site

    by butterflykizzez04 Updated May 21, 2014
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    Tony and I enjoy hiking around different parks..Now I call it hiking, even if there are no caves, waterfalls or mountains involved....it's basically a word I use for just plain walking around sometimes..Like here...at Winstead Park...we didn't actually hike we parked our car and took a very nice walk.

    We first went over and read the signs about the history of the park and the military that was there. Then we walked out the paved path. It was very nice walk among the trees and the pathway winds along the pathway of the grounds. There are a few benches in the park. There is no picnic tables in this section of the park.

    It is a nice area. You can walk, jog, walk your doggies or even bike if you want to. It is really nice and sort of level, with just a little up and down grades, nothing very major. You can easily take your children here and have a great time.

    Back at the parking lot area there is the public bathrooms for your use and they are very clean.

    To the left of the restrooms the path winds up hill a little bit with some steps where you will find the cannons and monuments. It is a very nice park with great over view of Franklin. A very important battle was fought here during the Civil War. It is a nice park to visit especially if you are into the historical facts of area or following the parks and facts about the Civil War.

    Like me??? Yep like Me !!!

    If you can go here, please do...if you know anything about me, you know I enjoy FREE and of course this lovely park is absolutely FREE to enjoy...can you believe that...?
    Enjoy!!!

    Winstead Hill Park is located south of downtown Franklin on Columbia Highway and consists of 61 acres with a walking trail, parking area, and restroom facilities. Winstead Hill Park has open spaces with tranquil wooded areas and is closed from dark until dawn.

    Amenities

    61 acre Historic Battle Site
    3/4 mile Walking Trail
    Restrooms
    Civil War Monument

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    Carnton Plantation- Civil War & Widow of the South

    by TravellerMel Written Mar 6, 2014

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    Carnton Plantation is an antebellum home in Franklin which played a major part in the Battle of Franklin on November 30, 1864. The home was less than a mile from the battle, and so was commandeered as a confederate field hospital - one of the largest of the time. Over 300 injured and dying men were brought to the house, with hundreds more positioned around the grounds. It was on Carnton's back porch that four Confederate generals’ bodies—Patrick Cleburne, John Adams, Otho F. Strahl and Hiram B. Granbury—were laid out so the men could pay their last respects. Surgeries (mostly amputations) took place in the children's bedrooms upstairs, where you can still see the bloodstains on the wooden floors.

    The bestselling book "The Widow of the South" is about the mistress of this house - Carrie McGavock - who herself ministered to the men, using her own linens and clothing as bandages, and making breakfast.

    Today, the house is on the National Registry of Historic Places, and is managed by a non-profit. The tour, which is given hourly during operating hours, is wonderful - it is a beautiful house without the historic significance, and I enjoyed hearing about life at the home, and seeing the original furnishings - including a rocking chair which was a gift from Thomas Jefferson, a frequent visitor.

    Also on the grounds are a slave house, and a smokehouse, and a Confederate cemetery. Admission is $15/adult, and you can get discount coupons in most of the tourist flyers or magazines. Very worthwhile and interesting!

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    Collins Farm

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 8, 2014

    Collins Farm is a 3 acre Historic Park near the Eastern Flank Battle Park and Carnton Plantation. The property has limited vehicle access and amenities. It is permissable to walk around the park to view the property.

    Collins' Farm

    William C. Collins (1823-1895), the manager of Carnton Plantation during the Civil War, and his wife, Lucy Allen Birch Collins (1824-1909) lived in the house, which still stands. This land was the northeastern parcel of Carnton Plantation with the Carter Estate across the tracks to the northwest. Following the Battle of Franklin, the house served as a field hospital and several soldiers were temporarily buried in the garden. Collins’ son-in-law, George W. Cuppet, supervised the re-interment of soldiers in McGavock Cemetery. In 1867, Collins purchased from John McGavock this 3 1/2 acre Lot No. 1 in the Plan of Carnton . In 1911 the property was bought by Thomas F. P. Henderson who, at the end of WWI was a member of the plot to kidnap the German Kaiser Wilhelm.

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    Third Coast Clay - Paint your Cares Away

    by TravellerMel Updated Oct 27, 2011

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    OK, I must have been an artist in a previous life... Granted, in THIS life, I have no talent for it, but I sure do have the affinity! This is a different kind of painting - you select the clay piece you want to paint (plates, cups, teapots, banks, statues, pet bowls, ornaments, trinket boxes...), then help yourself to the paint colors you want, then go to town! When you are done painting, you leave the piece there to be glazed and fired - you can pick it up one week later.

    There is a $6/person studio fee, which covers the paints and the firing, after which each piece is priced separately (I got a platter for $24, they had adorable gnome statues for $20, coffee mugs for $12-18). Pieces run from $6 - $60 dollars, depending on what you choose.

    This would be so fun for a "Girls Nite Out", bridal shower, or a kids birthday party. I can't wait to pick up my platter next week - I'll post a photo then!

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    Winstead Hill

    by JustxLindsey Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Yet another site of the Battle of Franklin. Winstead Hill was held by Federal Troops during the Battle of Franklin and served as a vantage point for the battle below. Now it offers a shady trail up the hill to view monuments, a 3-D map of the battle, and a beautiful view of Franklin below. There is also a longer walking trail going in a circle around the recently expanded park. Parking is free, and there is no charge for admission.

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    bucket of blood neighborhood

    by doug48 Updated Nov 5, 2010

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    bucket of blood historic marker
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    the bucket of blood neighborhood was one of four african american neighborhoods that were developed after the civil war in franklin. former slave rev. william perkins was the first freedman to build a house in the neighborhood. this neighborhood gets it's name from a story about a man that was knifed and bled "a bucket of blood". from the 1870's to the 1960's many residents of the bucket of blood neighborhood worked at the lilly flour mill. the lilly flour mill closed in the 1960's which had a negative economic impact on the area. today downtown development has advanced north into the area and little remains of it's african american roots.

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    franklin visitor center

    by doug48 Updated Nov 5, 2010

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    franklin visitor center

    the franklin visitor center is located in the historic mc phail building on main street just south of courthouse circle. at the visitor center you can get directions and maps of the historic attractions of franklin and williamson county.

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    methodist church

    by doug48 Written Nov 5, 2010

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    methodist church

    the current methodist church was built in 1871. the previous church on this site was used as a union field hospital during the battle of franklin. the methodist church is one of several historic churches in downtown franklin.

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    watson house

    by doug48 Written Nov 5, 2010

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    watson house

    this beautiful second empire brick home was built in 1881. the watson house is one of a number of post civil war homes located in downtown franklin. the downtown franklin historic district is listed on the national register of historic places.

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    courtney-bradford house

    by doug48 Written Nov 5, 2010

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    courtney-bradford house

    the courtney-bradford house was built in 1840. the courtey-bradford house is one of numerous antebellum homes located in downtown franklin. for those interested in southern culture and architure downtown franklin should not be missed when in south central tennessee. at the franklin visitor center you can get information on historic walking tours of downtown franklin. the downtown franklin historic district is listed on the national register of historic places.

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    fort granger

    by doug48 Updated Nov 5, 2010

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    fort granger
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    fort granger was an earthen fort located northeast of downtown franklin. fort granger was union general john scholfield's headquarters. during the battle of franklin artillery from this location pounded the confederate advance over a mile away. later in the battle scholfield abandoned the fort and withdrew to nashville. today fort granger is a public park and the fort is well preserved.

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    confederate cemetery

    by doug48 Written Nov 4, 2010

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    confederate cemetery

    located on the grounds of carnton plantation is a cemetery for many of the confederate soldiers killed in the battle of franklin. john mc gavock donated the land for the cemetery in 1866. the cemetery is open to the public and does not require an admission fee to the plantation.

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    carnton plantation

    by doug48 Updated Nov 4, 2010

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    carnton plantation
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    carnton plantation was built by randal mc gavock in 1826. mc gavock was a former nashville mayor and was well known in political circles in the state of tennessee. andrew jackson was a frequent visitor to carnton plantation. randal's son john mc gavock inherited the plantation and was in residence there during the battle of franklin. during the battle of franklin the carnton plantation served as a confederate field hospital. today there are still blood stains in the house from injured confederate soldiers. after the battle of franklin the bodies of confederate generals patrick cleburne, john adams, hiram granbury, and otho strahl where taken to carnton. in 1866 john mc gavock donated part of his land for a confederate cemetery. the carnton plantation is a very interersting place to visit for those interested in architecture and civil war history. carnton plantation is listed on the national register of historic places. for admission and times see the attached web site.

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    lotz house

    by doug48 Updated Nov 4, 2010

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    lotz house civil war museum

    the historic lotz house and civil war museum was built by german immigrant johann lotz in 1855. the lotz house was located in the heart of the battle of franklin in 1864. during the battle a cannon ball went through the roof of the house and damaged it's interior. this beautiful antebellum home is now a civil war museum and is open to the public. for those interested in architecture and civil war history the lotz house is well worth a visit when in franklin.

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