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  • robertlarsonjr's Profile Photo

    Friendly people open atmosphere in Nashville

    by robertlarsonjr Updated Dec 6, 2010

    Favorite thing: In 2009 my wife and I spent a day in Nashville Tennesse. The culture of the city is very inviting. Shops, bars and restaurants have open doors down the main streets with live music coming out of many of the bars. Strangers would strike-up conversations with us and people would come by to pet our dog. The big thing is parking is tough downtown. We payed about 25 dollars for all day parking in a lot. Without using the lots parking is tough.

    Fondest memory: Many of the stores are small business selling antiques, clothing or food. We found a lot of unique things in those small shops for very reasonable prices.

    Related to:
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    Nashville

    by traveldave Updated Dec 1, 2010

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    Favorite thing: Nashville was established in 1799 where Fort Nashborough was built on the banks of the Cumberland River to protect settlers from American Indian attacks. Once the natives were pacified, the settlement, then called Nashborough, became a center for the commerce and trade which flourished up and down the river. Later, steamboats and railroads brought more business and prosperity. The city also became a center for the printing industry, due to its location between the North and the South.

    In 1784, the area that is now Tennessee was part of North Carolina. The settlement was renamed Nashville by the North Carolina legislature because Nashborough sounded too British, and they wanted no reminder of the "colonial oppressors."

    Nashville is known worldwide as the country music capital of the world. Radio came to Nashville in 1922, and WSM radio station featured live country music on its show called Barn Dance. In 1925, the show was renamed the Grand Ole Opry. Country music artists flocked to the city every week to perform, practice, and sign record deals. Song writers and publishers became established in Nashville, and the country music industry has grown ever since.

    Nowadays, Nashville is Tennessee's capital and largest city, with about 1,640,000 inhabitants in the metropolitan area.

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    Chattanooga

    by traveldave Updated Dec 1, 2010

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    Favorite thing: Chattanooga is located on the banks of the Tennessee River in the mountainous southeastern part of the state. Its name actually comes from a Creek Indian term meaning "rock coming to a point," and refers to the outline of Lookout Mountain, which towers over the city.

    In 1816, Chief John Ross of the Cherokee Indian tribe established a settlement that was eventually to become Chattanooga. Originally called Ross's Landing, it consisted of a ferry, a warehouse, a few houses, and a landing. Because of the settlement's strategic location, it quickly grew into the largest city in the area, and was renamed Chattanooga in 1838. Soon thereafter, the terminus of the Western & Atlantic Railroad was established in Chattanooga, making it an important rail and transportation center.

    During the American Civil War, Chattanooga became one of the most important distribution centers for the Confederate army. The city therefore had to be taken by Union forces, and the resulting Campaign for Chattanooga was the bloodiest two-day battle during the entire war, with over 37,000 casualties.

    After the American Civil War, the city's burgeoning iron industry gave rise to the nickname "Pittsburgh of the South." However, by the mid-twentieth century, Chattanooga's economy faltered, and in 1969 it was called the dirtiest city in America. This gave rise to policies which eventually brought about a revitalization of the city. Nowadays, there are many new museums, shopping venues, restaurants, outdoor cafes, and other attractions which make Chattanooga a worthwhile destination for travelers.

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    Rock N' Roll is Here to Stay: Sun Studio

    by deecat Updated Oct 24, 2009

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    Favorite thing: 1949 was the year that Sam Phillips opened his own recording studio in Memphis. It was then and still is an undistinguished brick building east of downton Memphis. He named it Sun Studio and advertised, "We record anything---
    anywhere---anytime."

    In 1954, a young machine shop worker named Elvis Presley walked into Sun Studio and sang, "That's All Right, Mama". Philips heard him singing and thought, That's it. That's what he'd been looking for. A white boy who could sing like a black boy." Philips taped Elvis (who had paid him $3.98), and the song was an instant hit locally. The rest is history.

    In 1955, Phillips sold Sun's contract with Elvis for $35,000, but he insists that he does not regret it because it gave him money to develop other artists. And that he did!

    Jerry Lee Lewis - Whole Lotta
    Shakin' Going On (1957).

    Johnny Cash "I Walk the Line"

    Carl Perkins "Blue Suede Shoes"

    Jerry Lee Lewis "Whole Lotta Shakin' Going On"

    Also, Roy Orbison and Charlie Rich began at Sun Studio.

    Although Sun Studio is a tourist attraction by day, it's an active recording studio at night.

    Fondest memory: Just walking into a studio with all that history, all those memories, all that ambience....it was memorable. I liked the idea that the unassuming young Elvis began his career in this unassuming brick building in Memphis, Tennessee!

    706 Union Avenue
    Memphis, Tennessee

    (901)-521-0664

    Sun Studio in Memphis
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    Magnolia Trees

    by OlenaKyiv Written Jun 26, 2007

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    Fondest memory: What my mother liked about Tennessee was abundance of magnolia trees. Those trees are very gorgeous and beautiful with large white flowers and dark green leaves. The trees' blossom make eyes happy during late srping and early summer.

    Magnolia tree's flower Magnolia tree's flower
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    Cumberland River

    by OlenaKyiv Written Jun 26, 2007

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    Favorite thing: Cumberland River flows by through Nashville. It is 687 miles (1,106 km) long. It starts in eastern Kentucky on the Cumberland Plateau, flows through southeastern Kentucky before crossing into northern Tennessee, and then curves back up into western Kentucky before draining into the Ohio River at Smithland, Kentucky.

    Cumberland River
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    Appalachian Mountain Range

    by Astrobuck Written Mar 28, 2006

    Fondest memory: I took this picture on one of my whirlwind adventures. This was a VERY hard range to cross, basically because I took state and county roads instead of the interstate. But as you can see, the trip truly paid off with a nice picture.

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  • deecat's Profile Photo

    Becoming President Via Tennessee Politics

    by deecat Updated May 29, 2005

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    Favorite thing: Another nickname for Tennessee is Mother of Southwestern Statesmen" because three U.S. presidents once lived in the state. (Andrew Jackson, James Polk, and Andrew Johnson)
    .
    Andrew Jackson was a lawyer in Nashville and became a hero in the War of 1812 against the Creek Indians. As a result, he earned the nickname, "Old Hickory". He was elected as the Seventh President of the US in 1828.

    James Polk (POKE) was born in North Carolina but moved to Nashville at the age of 11. He grew up in the Duck River Valley. Polk served in the State Legislature and the U.S. House of representatives before becoming governor of Tennessee.

    As president, he announced that he would only serve one term, but he promised to lower the tariff, settle a border dispute with Great Britain over Oregon, acquire California, and establish an independent treasury office.

    He accomplished all four of these promises. Remembered as one of the hardest working men ever to serve as president, he died a few months after he left office! His tomb is on the state capitol grounds.

    Fondest memory: Andrew Johnson, the third Tennessean to become President of the United States, first served as governor of Tennessee. Next, he was elected as a U.S. Senator from Tennessee. In 1865, he became Abraham Lincoln's Vice President. After Lincoln's assassination, Johnson became President.
    He faced the difficult task of rebuilding the South after the Civil War. He had disagreed with secession, so after he became president, he tried to bring the Southern States back into the Union. Some northern senators felt that Johnson was too lenient to the South and tried to have him impeached; a single vote in the Senate saved him. Thus, he served out his term.

    I think it speaks well of a state that can claim three United States Presidents!

    Andrew Johnson National Historic Site, Greeneville
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    Tennessee River

    by deecat Updated May 29, 2005

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    Favorite thing: The state of Tennessee is also called the Big Bend State because the Native Americans called the Tennessee River "The River of the Big Bend".

    The river flows south through Tennessee into Alabama; then, it turns north and flows back into Tennessee! Also, the river divides Tennessee into 3 divisions.

    In the city of Savannah, you are able to visit the Tennessee River Museum with its exhibits on paleontology, archaeology, steamboats, and the Civil War.
    [(731-925-2364)]

    Many people find it interesting that many dams have been built on the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers which have created beautiful lakes. The largest of those lakes in Tennessee is Kentucky Lake at the western Kentucky-Tennessee border.

    Tennessee River is the longest, but it's smallest in volume of the three large rivers in the state (The other two are the Mississippi and the Cumberland).

    Since the 1980s, Tennessee has become more prosperous because The Tombigbee Waterway opened in 1985 to connect the Tennessee and Tombigbee Rivers. Ships that use the waterway can travel quickly from the southern United States to ports along the Gulf of Mexico. Thus, Tennessee businesses are able to trade goods with other countries.

    Fondest memory: The Tennessee River Gorge in the Chattanooga area was formed aeons ago when it cut deeply into Walden Ridge. As the river leaves Walden Ridge, it becomes Nickajack Lake, impounded by Nickajack Dam south of Jasper.

    Thank goodness, this area has avoided development. Now, it is being preserved as a biosphere environment. You can see ospreys, peregrine falcons, and bald eagles here.

    Tennessee River
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  • deecat's Profile Photo

    Premier Archaeological Site: Pinson Mounds

    by deecat Updated May 29, 2005

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    Favorite thing: One of the most fascinating places I've ever visited in Tennessee would be Pinson Mounds State Archaeological Area south of Jackson off of US-45. This protected site includes a series of mounds that date from the Middle Woodland Period (200 B.C.E. to A.D. 500).

    There's a very informative museum underground in a "faux mound" which is really like taking a walk through Tennessee's prehistoric past. Best of all, it includes the 13,000-year-old remains of a Mastodon!

    When you emerge from the underground museum's rear door, you see the second tallest mound in the US (72 feet). All I could think of as I looked at it was to think how many baskets of dirt it took to build it.

    The park has trails, one of which is a boardwalk through a cypress bottom on the Forked Deer River.

    Fondest memory: The Pinson Mounds were created by Indians (often called "Mound Builders").

    Today, we can see 30 mounds, and I thought that four of the most unusual have either cone or pyramid shapes. Some experts think that the Mound Builders built their temples on top of huge mounds of earth. We know for sure that they buried their dead in the cone-shaped mounds, along with funeral gifts of pottery, shell spoons, and copper breastplates.

    We noted that scientists are still digging here to learn more about the Mound Builders. Supposedly, these Mound Builders developed from a hunting culture to one that farmed for food and built large earthen mounds of religious or ceremonial purposes.

    There were also Mound Builders who lived along the rivers of the present states of Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, Georgia, Mississippi, and, of course, Tennessee.

    Besides Pinson Mounds, other important clusters of mounds in the state are on a bluff above the Tennessee River, in Shiloh National Military Park, and at Chucalissa, in Memphis near the Mississippi River.

    By the 1500s, the Mound Builders had disappeared, and no one knows what happened to these mysterious people.

    (731)988-5614

    Pinson Mounds State Archaeological Area
    Related to:
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    • Museum Visits
    • Archeology

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    Tennessee's Secret Role in World War II

    by deecat Updated May 29, 2005

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    Favorite thing: Oak Ridge, Tennessee, looks like an ordinary town today, but if you known the history of WWII, then you know that it's far from ordinary.

    The story goes that Albert Einstein wrote a letter to the President saying that the Germans were working on a powerful bomb and that we needed to counteract with a bomb of our own. President Roosevelt, along with his military and scientific advisors, felt it critical to beat the Germans to their own goal. Their plan was to produce an atom bomb within a very short amount of time. They called this secret plan the Manhattan Project.

    They also chose a secret site on a hillside known as Black Oak Ridge on the Clinch River near Knoxville, Tennessee
    .
    Within a period of five months, 56,000 acres of land was purchased (people were forced to sell their land, and three whole towns were eliminated). By the spring of 1945, a town with a population of 75,000 had been built, including homes and shops. The project was a success: They built the bomb and dropped it on Hiroshima, Japan, on August 6, 1945.

    It was not until after the bomb was dropped that the Oak Ridge workers learned that they had been working on the Atomic Bomb!

    I have a friend named Kate whose father worked on that Manhatten Project.

    Fondest memory: The U.S. government chose Tennessee as the site for the Atomic Energy Commission, which was created in 1947 and lasted until 1975. It was the predecessor of the U.S. Department of Energy.

    Today, east Tennessee's Knoxville/Oak Ridge Technology Corridor, including the University of Tennessee and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is a world renowned center for the research and development of new technologies. This area contains over five hundred high-tech companies.

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory, established in 1943 to develop an atomic bomb, was the site of the first continuously operating nuclear reactor in the world!

    The photo is from the Almanac and shows a sign at Oakridge during the Manhattan Project

    Signs at Oakridge during Manhattan Project
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    Davy Crockett Birthplace State Park

    by deecat Updated May 29, 2005

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    Favorite thing: David "Davy" Crockett: is he David or Davy? Well, his real name is "David", but his "Davy name" is used for the legendary figure portrayed in the popular 50s song and the Disney TV show called, "King of the Wild Frontier".

    David Crockett was born in a small cabin on the banks of the Noichucky River near a town in eastern Tennessee called Limestone (some call it Limestown!) Crockett also lived in middle Tennessee and finally in western Tennessee (where he was elected to Congress).

    But David Crockett died in Texas fighting at the Alamo. Before his death, he was a frontiersman, a military scout in the War of 1812, a judge, a politician, a Congressman from Tennessee, U.S. Representative, an author, and a soldier. He was NOT"born on a mountaintop", nor did he "kill a bear when he was only three"! That was the legendary Davy.

    The small cabin where he was born near Limestone has been reproduced and placed in the correct spot overlooking the river. This area is now called Davy Crockett Birthplace State Park.

    It's quite typical of a pioneer house with one room and a sleeping loft. It's filled with rough-hewn, homemade furniture.

    There's also a Museum of Davy Crockett's memorabilia. And, of course, there is a large recreational park here too. It was not a particular favorite of mine.

    Crockett, in my estimation, was a great man but not the "Superman " of fiction.

    Fondest memory: I was pleased to learn the truth about David Crockett, but I guess I'm also glad that as a young girl, I believed the story of Davy Crockett.

    Davy Crockett cabin
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  • deecat's Profile Photo

    Cumberland Mountain State Park

    by deecat Updated May 29, 2005

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    Favorite thing: (Please click photo to see my handsome husband Allan and his lovely sister Jayne in the Cumberland Mountain State Park.)

    3 times, we have visited the Crossville area, and while there, we usually go to the Cumberland Mountain State Park just south of the town.

    Beautiful sandstone (called Crab Orchard stone) seems to be all over. There's a large dam and bridge constructed of this sandstone. The dam impounds the water of Byrd Creek, and it is the largest masonry structure built by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC).

    In this state park, you'll find fifteen miles of hiking & nature trails, fifty-acre fishing lake called Byrd Lake, a mature hardwood forest, and lots of wildlife. It's basically day-use trails; there is one trail where camping is permitted called the Cumberland Overnight Trail.

    A big restaurant overlooks Byrd Lake, and it serves two meals a day year-round (except Christmas holidays).

    This is a pretty inclusive park with picnic tables, pavilions, an Olympic-sized swimming pool, canoe, paddleboat, and rowboat rentals, a Fitness walking course.

    It's open year round 8:00A.M. to 10:00 P.M.
    (closes at sundown in the winter)

    Fondest memory: I have fond memories of one aftenoon when Allan, his sister Jayne and her husband Ron, and I spent leisurely hours exploring this beautiful park.

    It's off US 127 about four miles south of Crossville

    Jayne & Allan in Cumberland Mountain State Park
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    Nashville's "The District"

    by deecat Updated May 29, 2005

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    Favorite thing: "The District" in Nashville is a five-block area of restored buildings made up of restaurants, shops, pubs, galleries, and music venues. It's really a catchy name for the downtown entertainment district found between Fifth Avenue and the river.

    This is the home of the original Grand Ole Opry in Ryman Auditorium. The famed Tootsie's Orchid Lounge also resides in this area. Here, you find the flavor of "Old Nashville" with the Wildhorse Salloon and genuine honky-tonks. The Hall of Fame and the Country Music Museum is also nearby.

    The newer portion of Nashville revolves around a mammoth suburban complex of the new Opryland that includes the gigantic Opryland Hotel, The Grand Ole Opry House, the Opry Mills Mall & the General Jackson showboat.

    There are other tourist attractions nearby that market themselves as "Music Valley."
    But, for real country music fans, Fan Fair is the big deal. For four days in June, about 25,000 fans come to see their favorite country music stars perform. In addition, they stand in long lines to talk with their chosen favorites and to obtain an autograph.

    Perhaps the most fun, however, is to see a live performance in a smaller venue such as a coffee house or intimate club--anything from bluegrass to classical and everything in between.

    Fondest memory: Below Fifth Avenue used to be "derelict", but it's been revised. The architecture on Second Avenue is certainly worth a visit. Here, you'll see fancy cornice brackets, hooded windows, and other decorative features in the country's largest collection of Victorian commercial buildings.

    Don't fret about some of the "tacky" tourist shops on lower Broad; instead, focus on the positive such as Gruhn Guitars (probably one of the finest guitar stores int he world), and the old-fashioned Ernest Tubb Record Shop or Hatch Show Prints--all are genuine "old Nashville"!

    Gruhn Guitars in Nashville
    Related to:
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    • Architecture

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    Meeman-Shelby State Park North of Memphis

    by deecat Updated May 29, 2005

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    Favorite thing: The park roads of Meeman-Shelby State Park is almost as much fun as the park itself.

    The bluff roads have roller-coaster dips that almost make your stomach "soar". This park has a western park boundary that follows the Mississippi River shoreline for at least 8 miles, and the Chickasaw Bluffs rise above it all.

    There's plenty of recreational opportunites with riding stables, a golf course, softball diamond, badminton, volleyball, and an Olympic-sized swimming pool. There's fishing allowed year-round in the 125-acre Poplar Tree Lake.

    But, I think that the walking trails and paved bike path trails offer the most fun because wildlife is abundant, and you can see them from this system of trails.

    I suggest that you go to the rustic Meeman Interpretive Center where naturalists conduct presentations about ecology, the environment and the park's history.

    They have furnished cabins along the Poplar Tree Lake, and there is a campground with fifty sites.
    You can make all your arrangements for activities, programs, maps, and rentals through the visitor's center.

    I think that the best of the trails is The Chickasaw Trail that is about 8 miles which follow the bluffs from the Mississippi River Group Camp to Poplar Tree Lake. It's really great because of all the animals you see along the way.

    Fondest memory: We were here in the fall, and the weather was perfect as was the magnificent blaze of color.

    Route 3, Millington, TN 38053

    (901)876-5215

    Meeman-Shelby State Park
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