McMinnville Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by butterflykizzez04
  • Things to Do
    by butterflykizzez04
  • Things to Do
    by butterflykizzez04

Most Recent Things to Do in McMinnville

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    First United Methodist Church

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Jul 1, 2014

    History of the McMinnville First United Methodist Church


    The Methodist movement in America can trace its roots to a meeting held in
    Delaware by Dr. Thomas Coke to organize a group of preachers to carry out Wesley’s
    grand plan to spread the faith throughout the Colonies. Thus, in 1784, the Methodist
    Episcopal Church was born in our nation.

    It did not take long for the circuit riders to carry Methodism to the frontier west.
    By the time Tennessee became a state in 1796, meeting houses were established in many
    communities and small towns.

    When the pioneers settled in Warren County, they brought their religion. The
    Church at Shiloh was one of the first congregations to organize along the Methodist
    doctrine here. Others followed soon after, and it was not long before a Bible group was
    assembling at the Court House in McMinnville. Oddly enough, there were few church
    buildings erected at this time even though the Baptists and Church of Christ
    congregations were already organized.

    By the 1830’s, there was a movement in the city to build appropriate meeting
    houses to better accommodate the growing congregations of worshippers. It was at this
    time that the Methodists here decided to erect a proper chapel for the town residents. A
    site was chosen behind the current Magness library and a building was constructed. In
    1852, the “Little Brick Church” was built which served the congregation for many years.

    The history of the current sanctuary began in the 1880’s when the flourishing
    Methodist congregation decided to acquire a lot on Main Street on which to build a new
    church. On August 25, 1886, the dedication stone was set in a grand ceremony which
    included a barbeque and music provided by the Warren House Band. Enough money was
    raised to get the building underway, but not enough to finish it as quickly as most would
    have liked. The final dedication came in 1889 when the $18,000 construction cost was
    liquidated and all building debts were paid.

    Today, the sanctuary remains almost unchanged. Some interior work was done to
    reconfigure the chancel rail and pipe organ some years ago, and the original hanging light
    fixtures have been replaced with new ones. Some of the woodwork has been painted, but
    the beautiful stained glass windows and the pews remain virtually unchanged.

    Additions have been made to the exterior, however. The Willis Chapel to the rear
    of the main sanctuary was completed in 1940 after a receiving a sizable bequeath by Joh

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    The Black House

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 7, 2014

    The Black House is the oldest remaining house in McMinnville, Tennessee.

    Built on acreage that was originally outside the city limits of McMinnville, this house is a good example of the Federal style that once lined our city's streets.

    Jesse Coffee built the home in 1825, but removed himself and his family to Viola the next year. This restored structure was subsequently home to a Revolutionary War solider, Lt. James Sheppard, and to Samuel Laughlin (a close friend of President James K. Polk) and to Judith Harrison. Mrs. Harrison planted the large magnolias in the front yard and helped introduce horticulture to McMinnville, leading to the city's number of renowned gardens in the 1800's.

    A Confederate surgeon, Thomas Black (1837-1904), purchased the home in the days after the War Between the States and maintained his clinic and office there.

    His granddaughter, Jean Leonard, deeded the house and contents to the Eagle Fund for restoration in the mid-1980s. The house has been partially restored and includes many period furnishings throughout the home.

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    McMinnville Railroad Bridge over the Barren River

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 7, 2014

    Tony and I was passing through McMinnville and stopped to take pictures at this park..

    Railroad Bridge over Barren Fork - McMinnville, TN

    I can't find too much information on how old this bridge is, but there was a railroad line that ran from McMinnville to Tullahoma before the Civil War. During the war, the north destroyed every bridge on this line between the two cities, including the one that crossed the Barren Fork River, which I assume is at this same spot.

    Originally, there were multiple mills up and down the river through here, but in 1902, a hydroelectric dam was built, but is not in use anymore. According to a photo on the historical marker nearby, this bridge was already here when the dam was built.

    At one time, the bridge was used by NCStL, and then by L&N, and then by CSX. Today, the tracks are used by the short line Caney Fork & Western Railroad, which connects CSX from Tullahoma to Manchester and Sparta.

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    Bluegrass Underground - Music at 333 feet below

    by TravellerMel Written Sep 30, 2011

    Bluegrass Underground is a monthly radio show recorded live 333 ft underground at Cumberland Caverns inside The Volcano Room. The room and caverns, created over 3.5 million years, create one of the most acoustically pure natural spaces on earth. No man-made sound reaches the Volcano Room and the living rock is jagged and uneven, providing limited echo. No matter what is the outside temperature, the Volcano Room is a constant 56 degrees.

    If you come for the concert, try to arrive at least an hour before. You have to be guided in and out of the cave, and the guide takes you in by group. If you miss one group, you must wait for the next one, and they seem to take you in ever 15-20 minutes. It is an fairly easy walk on gravel and then inside the caverns, but a little steep in some places. The caverns are NOT handicapped accessible.

    Once inside, they have general admission seating, picnic benches, food and merchandise vending, and restrooms.

    Cumberland Caverns Bluegrass Underground Bluegrass Underground Bluegrass Underground
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McMinnville Things to Do

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