Fun things to do in Memphis

  • the legendary Orpheum Theater
    the legendary Orpheum Theater
    by richiecdisc
  • Beale Street
    by TravellerMel
  • Beale Street
    by TravellerMel

Most Viewed Things to Do in Memphis

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    Tom Lee Park

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Jul 27, 2014

    On Sunday, July 27, 2014, Tony, Noel and I arrived at the Riverfront park named "TOM LEE PARK" after a very famous hero that saved many people out of the Mississippi River.
    The park is very nice and is Free. The statue is amazing!

    They have the BBQ Cookoff here at this park every year on the third week of May. I found some information on the internet that I wanted to share:

    om Lee Park is a city park located to the immediate west of downtown Memphis, Tennessee, overlooking the Mississippi River. Encompassing about 30 acres (0.12 km²) parallel to the Mississippi River for about one mile (1.6 km), it offers panoramic views of the Mississippi River and the shores of Arkansas on the opposite side. The park is named after Tom Lee, an African-American riverworker, who saved the lives of 32 passengers of the sinking steamboat M.E. Norman in 1925.[1]

    Tom Lee Park is a popular location for walkers, joggers, roller bladers and cyclists, and hosts events throughout the year, including the Beale Street Music Festival that kicks off Memphis in May.

    I will definitely go to this park again once the weather is very sunny and very nice. I think my photos would be much nicer.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    Chickasaw Heritage Park

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Jul 27, 2014

    n Sunday morning after eating breakfast in West Memphis, Arkansas, we headed back into Memphis via Rt 55 Bridge and took the first exit on right as you cross the Mighty Mississippi River.
    The road stops at a stop sign and you make a left and you are on Metal Museum Drive. To your immediate Left is the Chickasaw Heritage Park sign and statue of the Indian Lady. To your right is the abandoned Memphis Marine Military Hospital...scary looking!!!

    The park is a good size park with bluffs overlooking the Mississippi River with historical markers talking about Desoto. I never did see a sign that mentioned DeSoto Park so I am wondering if this is the same location.

    There are Indian burial mounds and plenty of green grass to walk, stroll or jog or just play ball or have a picnic and family fun.

    some history about the park I found on the internet:
    Legacies - Chickasaw Heritage Park

    147 Metal Museum Drive, Memphis TN 38106

    Located in Memphis' French Fort Community, the 17-acre, historically significant park features Native American earth mounds, historic markers, walking paths and scenic views of the Mississippi River. The sculpture references the history of Chickasaw Heritage Park, which includes the Chucalissa tradition, explorer Hernando DeSoto, Spanish settlers, Fort Pickering, and a settlement of former slaves. The park offers a quiet, relaxing refuge, whose walking paths crisscross the park, also providing access to the neighboring Metal Museum.

    Bagwell describes her Legacies sculpture as a work that "bequeaths future generations, with a glimpse of some of the rich history that revolves around the Chickasaw Native Americans, African Americans, and Hispanic Americans in Memphis. I have been inspired to weave some of these memories into my concept."

    I would go here again!!
    Free and Nice location..a must if you live in the area or are visiting the area soon!!!

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    Memphis Marine Military Hospital

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Jul 27, 2014

    On Sunday, July 27, 2014, while looking for DeSoto Park in Memphis TN near the Mississippi River bluffs we happened across this OLD MARINE MILITARY HOSPITAL...it is abandoned and there are two buildings on the National Historical Register dating back to 1880's. Here are some notes I found about it on the internet:

    MEMPHIS MARINE HOSPITAL ... located at 360 Metal Museum Drive, was once part of the federal health care system under President John Adams to "provide for the relief and maintenance of disabled seamen". The hospital opened in 1884 and the existing structures date to 1936. The sprawling hospital sits on about 6 acres high on a bluff directly across from DeSoto Park. After decades of neglect the buildings have fallen into disrepair - but there's a hidden treasure here. Two buildings from the 1880s remain and both are on the National Register of Historic Places

    It was amazing to look at it, but the gates are high and locked. I would have loved to explore the grounds. It is said to be one of the most Haunted locations in the entire state of Tennessee...oooooohhh!!!

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    Humes High School

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Jul 27, 2014

    July 27, 2014 Noel Lori-Elizabeth Teel, Dale Tony Vanoy and I visited Humes High School where Elvis went to school now it is a Middle School. It was easy to find with my GPS app on my android Gertrude..

    A little history of Humes:
    L. C. Humes High School, better known as simply Humes High School, was a high school located in Memphis, Tennessee. It was open from the 1930s through 1967 as a high school and is most remembered as Elvis Presley's high school. Elvis graduated from Humes on June 3, 1953. Now Humes Middle School, the building at 659 North Manassas Avenue is listed on the National Register of Historic Places due to its connection to Elvis. The school has numerous alumni from nearby Porter-Leath from its days as an orphanage and current foster care facility.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Music

    Was this review helpful?

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    Auction Square

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Jul 27, 2014

    One of the four squares to have been constructed in Memphis for the exchange and trade of bonded labor, the Auction Square on North Main Street, is also remembered as the first food market in Memphis.
    While the name does suggest that this square was the designated venue for slave auctions, the actual auctioning was conducted in either the Market Square or the indoor halls. Today, as one of the final remnants of this long-forgotten era in Memphis' past, the Auction Square still displays the original plaque which commemorates the two kinds of trade that have shaped much of Memphis' current-day economy — slaves and cotton. In fact, the plantation owners, who played a major role in Memphis' economic boom, are known to have been almost completely dependant on bonded labor, which they purchased in exchange for their cotton at Memphis

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    The Family Statue ( Art work)

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Jul 27, 2014

    Saturday July 26, 2014, while in Memphis TN with Noel Lori-Elizabeth Teel and Dale Tony Vanoy, we located this piece of Artwork called "The Family" it was located in the Peabody Place Lobby near the Belz Museum of Art off Main street at the Peabody Place Trolley Stop..it was very unique...you had to really look at it..

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    Peabody Ducks at the Peabody Hotel

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Jul 27, 2014

    Watching the "Peabody Ducks" a tradition at the Peabody Hotel in Memphis since 1930...Saturday July 26, 2014 at 11:00 ((( everyday))) they march from the roof home to the fountain in the lobby...was with Dale Tony Vanoy and Noel Lori-Elizabeth Teel

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    Gallina Exchange Building on Beale Street

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 9, 2014

    Gallina Exchange Building (1891), view 02, 177-81 Beale St, Memphis, TN, USA

    designed by B.C. Alsup for Squire Charles Gallina (c.1860-1914) • known as "The Pride of Beale Street" • originally contained 24/7 saloon with gambling and up to 14 bartenders, hotel w/ marble fireplace in every room •Gallina lived with family on top floor • temporary girders installed, 1980, after fire gutted building • rebuilding plans too difficult and expensive • proposal to move girders to back side of façade rejected partly because girders have become part of Beale St landscape • now patio for Silky O'Sullivan's • Beale St Historic District, National Register #66000731, 1966 • designated National Historic Landmark District, 1966
    Judge Charles Gallina built the structure in 1891. Designed by B. C. Alsup, it was known as the Pride of Beale Street, housing a bustling saloon which was open 24-7, and a hotel favored by the Orpheum Theatre crowd. Every room had a marble fireplace. Judge Gallina lived on the top floor and held court on the 2nd. After he died in 1914, the building was a pharmacy, clothing store, and dentist's office. The steel girders were added in 1980 as a temporary measure after fire gutted the interior. They are now an "art piece" and are probably permanent.

    Before the fire
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    Daisy Theater on Beale Street

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 9, 2014

    The Daisy Theatre is a prime surving example of nickelodeon architecture from the early cinema era. The tiny hall features a grand half dome entrance on Memphis’s famous Beale Street. It was constructed in 1912 and a loan was secured on a handshake.

    The Daisy Theatre is unusual in that the stage and screen are on the sidewalk end. Double doors on either side of the half-dome enter into small vestibules one on either side of the stage. Emerging from the vestibules, you have the audience looking at you!

    There is a small balcony, vaguely horse-shoe shaped, supported from above with iron rods. This is the reason for the reverse design, the fire escapes from the balcony and booth could only open onto the alley behind the building. There was no lobby at all, just hallways.

    During much of the 20th century Beale Street served as the business and entertainment center for African-Americans from all over the Mid-South. Despite its tiny stage, the Daisy Theatre was a prime performing venue on the so-called “Chitlin' Circuit” from the 1930’s up into the 1960’s.

    In 1941, the New Daisy Theatre was built directly across the street. It too survives and is used as a concert venue.

    During the 1980’s the “Old Daisy” was extensively renovated and reopened as a Beale Street Blues Museum. Today it is in use as a banquet hall providing live entertainment.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Theater Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    Martyr's Park in Memphis

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 9, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Opening in 1972, this newer park was a long-time coming. It's dedicated to those who did not flee from the yellow fever epidemic in 1878 and stayed to help those who were infected, and to bury the dead. Almost 80 percent of those who stayed caught the fever and one-quarter of them perished. The centerpiece of the park is the sculpture by Harris Sorrels

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    Memphis Bluffwalk Park

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 9, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Bluffwalk along the Mississippi River started as an idea in the 1970s to help in the downtown Renaissance. Today it runs atop the bluff from Union Avenue to Martyr's Park. Although the Bluffwalk had been a trail for decades, getting it officially developed was so controversial that it almost didn't happen. It is so popular now, that this almost seems unimaginable. The first section officially opened in 1999.

    While this is not actually a park and because it's new, it doesn't quite fit on a "Historical" page. However, it is felt that because of the popularity of this walk, it will be here a long time.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    Spanish War Memorial Park

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 9, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This memorial park honors the American Volunteers who fought Spain in Cuba, the Philippines and the Boxer Rebellion. The centerpiece statue of this small park was erected in 1956 with funds raised by Spanish War Veterans of Memphis under the leadership of Fred Bauer, Commander

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    Courthouse Square Park in Memphis

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 9, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Court Square provides the perfect place to sit in peace amid the hustle of Downtown Memphis. The quiet oasis is surrounded by office buildings and busy streets and offers a shady area with fountains, statues, and a gazebo, and places to relax and enjoy the restored antique trolleys going by on Main Street. The square is located between Main and Second Streets at Court Avenue. Of all the 4 original municipal parks laid out by the city planners in 1819, Court Square is the only one left in its original form. Ironically the land was set aside to build a court house, but no courthouse was ever built on Court Square. It was however, the site of Memphis' first schoolhouse. The land for Court Square was donated by John McLemore, one of the founders of Memphis

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    W. C. Handy Park on Beale Street

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 9, 2014

    W. C. Handy Park, located on Beale Street, was dedicated to "Father of the Blues", W. C. Handy in 1931. Since its creation, the park has been a meeting ground for musicians, with Blues artists still playing in the park for tips. Today, the area is an outdoor performing arts park, where in good weather, street musicians start wandering about noon. The old Beale Street Market House from 1899 originally occupied this site but was torn down to make room for the park. The statue of Handy was decidated in 1960.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • butterflykizzez04's Profile Photo

    Jefferson Davis Park in Memphis

    by butterflykizzez04 Written Feb 9, 2014

    When Riverside Drive was constructed in the mid-1930s, Jefferson Davis Park was built on what had been an old dumping ground for construction debris and dredge materials from the Mississippi River. It was enlarged to its present size in 1937, using more material dredged from the river. The Park was named after Jefferson Davis, the President of the Confederacy, who lived in Memphis from 1869 to 1878 and who was president of an insurance company here. Recently, the city government very quickly renamed this park

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Memphis Hotels

See all 127 Hotels in Memphis

Latest Memphis Hotel Reviews

Peabody Hotel
Great (4.0 out of 5.0) 9 Reviews
Doubletree Hotel Memphis Downtown
Good (3.0 out of 5.0) 5 Reviews
Elvis Presley Heartbreak Hotel
Great (4.0 out of 5.0) 7 Reviews
Springhill Suites By Marriott Memphis Downtown
Great (4.0 out of 5.0) 3 Reviews
Residence Inn Memphis Downtown
Best (5.0 out of 5.0) 1 Review

Instant Answers: Memphis

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

34 travelers online now

Comments

Memphis Things to Do

Travel tips and advice posted by real travelers and Memphis locals.
Map of Memphis