Nashville Off The Beaten Path

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by butterflykizzez04
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by butterflykizzez04
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by butterflykizzez04

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Nashville

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    John W. Thomas 1830 - 1906

    by Yaqui Updated Sep 15, 2012

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    The plaque reads:

    A native of Nashville.
    Forty-eight years in the service
    of the Nashville, Chattanooga &
    St. Louis Railway;
    President for twenty-two years.
    President of the
    Tennessee Centennial Exposition,
    which resulted in securing
    to Nashville this Park.
    A worthy man in all the lines of life.
    An efficient man of affairs.
    An upright and eminent citizen.
    A Christian and a gentleman.
    A friend and a brother.
    This memorial is erected by the employees of the
    Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railway.
    - 1907 -

    Erected 1907 by Employees of the Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railway.

    Located next to the Parthenon 2600 West End Avenue, Nashville TN 37203

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    Federal Defenses

    by Yaqui Written Sep 15, 2012

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    The plaque reads:
    The hill to the west was a strong point in the system of permanent Federal defenses, started in 1862, which extended to the river on both sides of town. Artillery was emplaced here from time to time.

    Erected by Tennessee Historical Commission. (Marker Number N-13.)

    Located at Located at 2600 West End Ave, Nashville TN 37203

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    Marathon Motor Car

    by Yaqui Written Sep 15, 2012

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    The plaque reads:

    The Marathon Motor Car was manufactured here 1914-1916 by Southern Motor Works (later called Marathon). Four models, all touring cars, were powered by engines of 4 cylinders, 30/35 hp, & 6s of 50 hp, with wheelbases from 9'8" to 12'5". The plant closed operations in 1914 due to financial difficulties but continued a parts & service business until 1918.

    Erected 1979 by The Historical Commission of Metropolitan Nashville and Davidson County.

    Located at Marathon Village 1305 Clinton Street Nashville, TN 37203

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    Thomas Green Ryman 1841 - 1904

    by Yaqui Updated Sep 15, 2012

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    A prominent riverboat captain and Nashville businessman, Thomas Ryman was known for his generous contributions of time and money to the construction of the Union Gospel Tavernacle. In 1904, the Tabernacle was renamed the Ryman Auditorium in his honor.

    Sculptor - Steve Shields

    Located behind the Ryman Auditorium at 116 5th Ave North, Nashville TN 37219, United States of America.

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    Birth of Bluegrass

    by Yaqui Updated Sep 15, 2012

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    In December 1945, Grand Ole Opry star Bill Monroe and his mandolin brought to the Ryman Auditorium stage a band that created a new American musical form. With the banjo style of Earl Scruggs and the guitar of Lester Flatt, the new musical genre became known at "Bluegrass." Augmented by the fiddle of Chubby Wise and the bass of Howard Watts (also known as Cedric Rainwater), this ensemble became known as "The Original Bluegrass Band," which became the prototype for groups that followed.

    Erected by Tennessee Historical Commission. (Marker Number 3A 209.)

    Located at the Ryman Auditorium on 116 5th Ave North Nashville, TN 37219

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    Oh, Roy

    by Yaqui Written Sep 15, 2012

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    The plaque reads:

    This bronze sculpture is dedicated to the love and friendship that was shared with millions by two-country music's greatest performers. Roy Acuff, the King of Country Music, and Minnie Pearl, the Queen of Country Comedy, performed at the Ryman Auditorium from 1943 to 1974.
    ~Sculptor Russ Faxon

    Located inside the Ryman Auditorium at 116 5th Ave North Nashville, TN 37219

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    Downtown Presbyterian Church

    by Yaqui Written Sep 15, 2012

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    The plaque reads:

    From 1814 to 1955 this was the site of the First Presbyterian Church. President Andrew Jackson was received into the church in 1838. James K. Polk was inaugurated governor here in 1839. The building designed in the Egyptian style by William Strickland, architect of the State Capitol, was dedicated in 1851. When the First Church moved, the Downtown Church was organized.

    Erected by Tennessee Historical Commission. (Marker Number 3A 78.)

    Located at 5th Ave N and Church Street

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    Chet Atkins Statue

    by Yaqui Updated Sep 15, 2012

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    This statue dedicated to a wonderful singer & musician Chet Atkins.

    Chet Atkins, c.g.p.
    Russell Faxon - Sculptor
    Presented by
    Bank of America
    January 12, 2000

    Located at 474 Union Street, Nashville, Tennessee

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    Tennessee Ornithological Society

    by Yaqui Written Sep 15, 2012

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    The plaque reads:
    On October 7, 1915, Dr. George Curtis, Albert F. Ganier, Judge H.Y. Hughes, Dr. George R. Mayfield, Dixon Merritt, and A.C. Webb met at Faucon's Restaurant, 419 Union Street, approximately 50 feet east of here, to found the Tennessee Ornithological Society. T.O.S. was chartered by the state for the purpose of studying Tennessee birds. A journal, The Migrant, publishes accurate records of birds across the state. The Birds of the Nashville Area has local records. T.O.S. is the state's oldest conservation group in continuing existence. Donated in memory of B.B. Coffey (1870-1966)

    Erected 1992 by The Historical Commission of Metropolitan Nashville and Davidson County. (Marker Number 88.)

    Located at 454 Union Street, Nashville TN 37219

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    Murals & Historical Plaques~

    by Yaqui Updated Sep 15, 2012

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    If you choose to explore the city by foot like I do and I really enjoy it, you will come across some really unique murals and historical plaques. Take a moment and read one or two. You never know what you may just discover.:)

    Located at 417 Union Street, Nashville TN 37219

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    Jackson's Law Office

    by Yaqui Written Sep 15, 2012

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    The Plaque reads:
    Andrew Jackson settled in Nashville in 1788 and served as Atty. Gen. until 1796. Lawyer John Overton owned a building here (1791-96) and shared office space with his friend Jackson. Jackson was Tennessee's first Rep. to Congress (1796) and state Superior Court judge (1798-1804). He led U.S. troops to victory at the 1815 Battle of New Orleans and was elected President in 1828.

    Erected 1996 by The Nashville Bar Association. (Marker Number 98.)

    Located at 333 Union Street, Nashville TN 37201

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    The Seeing Eye

    by Yaqui Updated Sep 15, 2012

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    The plaque reads:

    Independence and Dignity Since 1929
    The Seeing Eye, the world-famous dog guide training school, was incorporated in Nashville January 29, 1929, with headquarters in the Fourth and First National Bank Building at 315 Union St. Morris Frank, a 20-year-old blind man from Nashville, and his guide dog Buddy, played a key role in the school's founding and subsequent success. It was Frank who persuaded Dorothy Harrison Eustis to establish a school in the United States.

    Erected 2008 by The Historical Commission of Metropolitan Nashville and Davidson County. (Marker Number 135.)

    Located at 383 3rd Avenue North, Nashville TN 37219

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    Site of First Store

    by Yaqui Updated Sep 15, 2012

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    The plaque reads:

    Lardner Clark came from Philadelphia in the early 1780's with ten horses packed with piece goods, needles and pins. He established Nashville's first drygoods store by 1786, on a site 30 yards east. The building, which served as store, tavern and dwelling, faced south and was known as "the house with a plazza."

    Erected 1963 by The Historical Commission of Metropolitan Nashville and Davidson County. (Marker Number 3.)

    Located at 436 2nd Avenue North, Nashville TN 37219

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    Colonel Richard Henderson

    by Yaqui Written Sep 15, 2012

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    The plaque reads:
    Founder and Promoter of the noted "Transylvania Land Company"

    Inscription.
    In recognition of
    Colonel Richard Henderson
    Born in Virginia 1735
    Died in North Carolina 1785

    Founder and Promoter of the noted
    "Transylvania Land Company"

    Whose purchase from the Cherokee Indians covered the territory from the waters of Kentucky River to that of Cumberland.

    His first settlement was made at Boonesborough, which failed in loss of title by action of Virginia.

    His second attempt at settlement was made in 1779-1780, at this place on Cumberland River, - then known as "The French Lick."

    He enlisted James Roberston of the Watauga Settlement to lead this project while he acted as commissioner from North Carolina to survey the boundary line between that state and Virginia in order to know in which state the settlement would fall.

    Early in 1870 Colonel Henderson joined the settlement provided corn for its maintenance, the "compact" for its civil government and a land-office for the sale of lands.

    Dissatisfaction soon arose as to the validity of titles, discouragements as to provisions, and danger from Indians. The life of the settlement was seriously threatened. Colonel Henderson returned to North Carolina leaving James Robertson in charge, who after many trials brought it to success.

    "Colonel Henderson was a gentleman eminently distinguished for his legal acquirements, both as an advocate and as a judge... still more so for a sound judgement as well as mental endowments... which made him an object of general admiration."
    Haywood

    Located at 170 1st Avenue North Nashville, TN 37201

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    Colonel John Donelson

    by Yaqui Written Sep 15, 2012

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    The Plaque Reads:
    In appreciation of
    the services of
    Colonel John Donelson
    Born in Delaware, 1718.
    Died in Kentucky 1786.

    Distinguished in early life in Virginia as a civil, industrial and military leader.
    Member of the House of Burgesses, iron manufacturer, Lieutenant Colonel of Pittsylvania County and devoted vestryman of Camden Parish.
    Noted surveyor of state boundaries, maker of treaties with the Indians, and revolutionary patriot. Emigrated west in 1779-1780. A leader and "Diarist" of the settlers going by water in; "The good boat adventure from Fort Patrick Henry to the French Salt Spring on Cumberland River."
    Founder of Donelson's Station on Stone's River 1780.
    One of the commissioners holding treaty with the Chickasaw Indians near Nashborough, 1783.
    Member of "The Tennessee Land Company" projecting a settlement in the "Great Bend" of Tennessee River, 1785.
    Lost his life—supposed to have been murdered by the Indian—near Big Barren River, Kentucky, 1786.

    "Distinguished not only in the estimation
    of his fellow citizens, but more excellent
    at home in the family circle" (Putnam)

    Located at 170 1st Avenue North Nashville, TN 37201

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Nashville Off The Beaten Path

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