Nashville Off The Beaten Path

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by butterflykizzez04
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by butterflykizzez04
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by butterflykizzez04

Best Rated Off The Beaten Path in Nashville

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    "Musica" Statue

    by Yaqui Written Sep 15, 2012

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    LeQuire writes, "Dance is the physical expression of music and the piece is intended to convey that feeling to the viewer in a composition which is simple, exuberant and celebratory. The theme of the sculpture is music, because of the historical and economic significance of the site. This is the heart of Music Row, the area and the artistic activity for which Nashville is best known.http://www.alanlequire.com/musica.shtml

    We saw this on the Trolley Tour and there were many snickers about how he said someone puts clothes on them from time to time. It is quite a lovely statue.

    Located at Take the I-40/I-65 downtown exit for Broadway, then head south along the interstate on 14th Ave. It will veer to the right, then turn right on Division St. The sculpture is in the traffic circle at the intersection of Division St. and 16th Ave. S.

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    Bradley Studios

    by Yaqui Updated Sep 15, 2012

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    The plaque reads:

    In 1955, brothers Owen and Harold Bradley built a recording studio in the basement of a house on this site. They added another studio here in an army Quonset Hut, producing hits by Patsy Cline, Red Foley, Brenda Lee, Marty Robbins, Sonny James, and others. Columbia Records purchased the studios in 1962. The studio established its reputation in the music industry with hits by stars including Johnny Cash, Bob Dylan, Roger Miller, George Jones, and Tammy Wynette.

    Donated by the Mike Curb Foundation, The Historical Commission of Metropollitan Nashville and Davidson County No. 140 Erected 2011

    Located at 34 Music Square West, Nashville TN 37203

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    The Founding of Nashville Statue

    by Yaqui Updated Sep 14, 2012

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    The plaque reads: On Monday, April 24, 1780, two pioneers, James Robertson and John Donelson, shook hands upon the completion of a reunion at the site on which you now stand. Each man, one by land, the other by water, played out in a two-fold plan for a new settlement that grew into present-day Nashville. Robertson, at the head of his mounted band of 226 frontiersmen, traversed the long, circuitous overland route through Kentucky and Tennessee down to the Great Salt Lick. His group arrived on Christmas Day, 1779, about the time that Donelson’s flotilla left Fort Patrick Henry, and at once set about preparing a place for the boatmen, women, and children who were to join them later. Robertson, as one of the earliest and most resourceful frontiersmen of early Tennessee history, had long realized that the rolling country and rich bottom-land of middle Tennessee would be an ideal location for a settlement. Although much warfare and violence were inevitable, it was his ability to deal with the Indians and their mutual respect and admiration for him that made this venture possible. He said, “we are the advance guard; our way is westward across the continent.” But civilization could only begin with the river-borne families that were to come in the spring. In four months these families floated the entire extent of the Tennessee River, then turned north to the Ohio and came up the Cumberland to the Great Salt Lick - a 1000-mile trip unequalled in the annals of American history. This flotilla was headed by the courageous Colonel John Donelson on his flagship Adventure. He triumphed over freezing weather, the treacheries of a river at the highest in its history, pestilence, and savage Indians to reach his April rendezvous. This achievement has immortalized his name, for he managed it so well that no man could have done it better. His responsibilities were great because he had in his charge a large percentage of non-combatants.

    In this memorial group each man stands as a representative of the hardy souls he led to fulfill a magnificent destiny. In this historic handshake each brave pioneer finds his place in history. No city should be indifferent to its founding, no people to its history, especially when so full of heroic action and noble deeds as is the history of Nashville. If space were available the name of every signer of the Cumberland Compact should be here; these two men stand witness to their toil and devotion.

    This statue, commissioned by Mayor Ben West in 1962, was erected here in the fort where they met the flowering spring day of long ago. This statue is intended to keep their memory green and our love for them tender and profound. These men are the trees; we are their fruit.

    Located at 170 1st Avenue North Nashville, TN 37201

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    Site of First Store

    by Yaqui Updated Sep 15, 2012

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    The plaque reads:

    Lardner Clark came from Philadelphia in the early 1780's with ten horses packed with piece goods, needles and pins. He established Nashville's first drygoods store by 1786, on a site 30 yards east. The building, which served as store, tavern and dwelling, faced south and was known as "the house with a plazza."

    Erected 1963 by The Historical Commission of Metropolitan Nashville and Davidson County. (Marker Number 3.)

    Located at 436 2nd Avenue North, Nashville TN 37219

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    Thomas Green Ryman 1841 - 1904

    by Yaqui Updated Sep 15, 2012

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    A prominent riverboat captain and Nashville businessman, Thomas Ryman was known for his generous contributions of time and money to the construction of the Union Gospel Tavernacle. In 1904, the Tabernacle was renamed the Ryman Auditorium in his honor.

    Sculptor - Steve Shields

    Located behind the Ryman Auditorium at 116 5th Ave North, Nashville TN 37219, United States of America.

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    Colonel James Robertson

    by Yaqui Written Sep 15, 2012

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    The plaque reads:

    In honor of
    Colonel James Robertson
    Born 1742 in Virginia
    Died 1814 in Tennessee

    He came from eastern North Carolina to the Watauga Settlement in what is now eastern Tennessee 1769-1770, where he was a leader in Civil and Indian Affairs.

    Conducted the "Land Party" of settlers to the French Lick in 1779-1780, built this fort Nashborough and defended it in all the various Indian attacks. Remained with the colony when many had forsaken it during a period of great stress, suffering and discouragement, and gave to it a whole life-time of patriotic service.

    The verdict of history well entitles him the name of: "The Father of West (now Middle) Tennessee" and the "Founder of Nashville."

    "He possessed to an eminent degree the confidence and esteem of all his contemporaries, and merited all the eulogium and affection which the most ardent of his countrymen have ever bestowed upon him.. His services in peace and war are gratefully remembered."~Haywood

    Located at 170 1st Avenue North Nashville, TN 37201

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    John W. Thomas 1830 - 1906

    by Yaqui Updated Sep 15, 2012

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    The plaque reads:

    A native of Nashville.
    Forty-eight years in the service
    of the Nashville, Chattanooga &
    St. Louis Railway;
    President for twenty-two years.
    President of the
    Tennessee Centennial Exposition,
    which resulted in securing
    to Nashville this Park.
    A worthy man in all the lines of life.
    An efficient man of affairs.
    An upright and eminent citizen.
    A Christian and a gentleman.
    A friend and a brother.
    This memorial is erected by the employees of the
    Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railway.
    - 1907 -

    Erected 1907 by Employees of the Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railway.

    Located next to the Parthenon 2600 West End Avenue, Nashville TN 37203

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    Tennessee Ornithological Society

    by Yaqui Written Sep 15, 2012

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    The plaque reads:
    On October 7, 1915, Dr. George Curtis, Albert F. Ganier, Judge H.Y. Hughes, Dr. George R. Mayfield, Dixon Merritt, and A.C. Webb met at Faucon's Restaurant, 419 Union Street, approximately 50 feet east of here, to found the Tennessee Ornithological Society. T.O.S. was chartered by the state for the purpose of studying Tennessee birds. A journal, The Migrant, publishes accurate records of birds across the state. The Birds of the Nashville Area has local records. T.O.S. is the state's oldest conservation group in continuing existence. Donated in memory of B.B. Coffey (1870-1966)

    Erected 1992 by The Historical Commission of Metropolitan Nashville and Davidson County. (Marker Number 88.)

    Located at 454 Union Street, Nashville TN 37219

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    RCA Studio B

    by Yaqui Written Sep 15, 2012

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    RCA Records established a recording studio in this building in Novemeber 1957, with local offices run by quitarist-producer Chet Atkins. Its success led to a larger studio, known as Studio A, built next door in 1964. Studio B recorded numerous hits by Elvis Presley, the Everly Brothers, Roy Orbinson, Don Gibson, Charley Pride, Jim Reeves, Dolly Parton, and many others. Along with Bradley Studios, Studio B is known for developing "The Nashville Sound."

    Located at 30 Music Square West, Nashville TN 37203

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    Take a day hike around Radnor Lake

    by Bunsch Updated Jul 31, 2009

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    Tha boardwalk at Radnor Lake (not my pic)

    We had a few hours to kill between our wonderful lunch and flight, so we coaxed my niece to drive us out to a place where we could work off a few calories and enjoy some scenery. She opted for Radnor Lake, which has a variety of interesting trails. We simply ambled around the lake's circumference, but in the process we got to see deer coming down to wade in the boggy surrounds, and a large variety of birds and small woodland critters. It was great to stretch our legs, but I could see there was plenty more to explore (including a waterfall, apparently, although it was too far for us to venture).

    Park: 6:00 a.m. to Dark
    Visitors Center: daily
    Sunday-Monday: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
    Tuesday-Thursday: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
    Friday-Saturday: 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.

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    Carillons and the Court of 3 Stars

    by Yaqui Written Sep 15, 2012

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    During the Music City Trolley Hop the second time around, the driver lets us get out and take some photo's of Carillons and the Court of 3 Stars.

    The Court of 3 Stars is a focal point of the park located at the northern end near Jefferson Street. Made of red, white and blue granite, this area represents the three Grand Divisions of the state - East, Middle and West Tennessee. This is also the site of a 95-bell carillon representing Tennessee's musical heritage. The 95 bells represent the citizens of Tennessee's 95 counties. A 96th bell, known as the answer bell, is located on the grounds of the State Capitol and rings in answer to the 95 bells, symbolizing government answering to the people. The carillons are some of the largest in the world. They play Tennessee-themed songs at the top of the hour, every hour.

    Tennessee Flags
    Located on each end of the River Walk are clusters of Tennessee flags. Each cluster contains one large 12 x 18-foot flag, and eight smaller 5 x 8-foot flags for a total of 18 Tennessee flags. The 16 small flags represent Tennessee being the 16th state admitted to the Union June 1, 1796. The two large flags represent the state's bicentennial celebration.

    The American flag is not flown in the mall since the park is an extension of the State Capitol, which flies the American flag high above the Bicentennial Capitol Mall State Park.

    Pathway of History
    Along the west side of the park, a 1,400-foot Wall of History is engraved with historic events that have occurred over the past two centuries. A granite pylon marks each ten-year period along the wall. The wall 'breaks' at the time of the Civil War to represent the divisive nature of the war on the state.http://www.tn.gov/environment/parks/Bicentennial/historical/index.shtml#mapplaza

    Located at Bicentennial Mall State Park 600 James Robertson Parkway Nashville, TN 37243

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  • Jack Daniels Old No. 7 Club

    by peach93 Updated Feb 19, 2006

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    Jack Daniels Old No. 7 Club
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    I'm listing this club as "Off the Beaten Path" because it's a private club and being such I guess the average person can't just waltz in. It is located in the Gaylord Entertainment Complex in downtown Nashville across the street from the Country Music Hall of Fame. Incidentally, the Gaylord Entertainment Complex also houses Nashville's NHL hockey team, The Predators, and this club is often used by members of the team, as well as its management and season ticket holders.

    I managed to end up here at a private Super Bowl Party during my stay in Nashville and I have to say that it's rather nice, so if you ever have the chance to go, go!

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    The Parthenon

    by Yaqui Updated Jul 16, 2014

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    The plaque reads:

    The world’s only replica of the Parthenon, epitome of Greek culture, was the central building at Tennessee’s Centennial Exposition, May 1 thru October 31, 1897. The original temple, dedicated to Athena, Greek Goddess of Wisdom occupied the most scared area in ancient Greece, the crest of the Acropolis, a hill overlooking Athens.

    Major Eugene C. Lewis, director of the Centennial believed that a reproduction of the Greek masterwork to serve as a gallery of fine arts would inspire a love of beauty and a spirit of excellence. Colonel William C. Smith served as architect and George J. Zolnay, sculptor. Contractor for the building was Edward Laurent with Foster and Creighton contracting for the foundation.

    The reception of the Centennial – It was the first exposition in the nation to be both an artistic and financial success – and public response to the Parthenon indicated, that although it was made of temporary materials, it should be reconstructed on a permanent basis. Construction was started in 1921, the exterior completed in 1925, but due to the lack to funds. It was not until May 20, 1931, that the Parthenon as it stands today was opened to the public.

    Hart, Freeland and Roberts, with William B. Dinsmoor consulting, served as architects George J. Zolnay, Leopold Scholz and Belle Linney Scholz. Sculptors. Foster and Creighton were general contractors, others who contributed to the work included John J. Early Company, General Bronze Corporation, John Bouchard and Sons, Herbrice and Lawrence H.E. Parmer, J.J. Hutchinson and Son, J.O. Kirkpatrick, Charles A. Howell Art Mosaic and Tile Company and A. T. Kanaday.

    Board of Park Commissioners
    Robert M. Dudley
    M.T. Bryan
    Lee J. Loventhal
    W.R. Cole
    Robert T. Creighton
    Charles M. McCabe
    Percy Warner
    Rogers Coldwell
    J.R.W. Brown
    Edwin Warner

    Located at 2600 West End Ave, Nashville TN 37203

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    Butler's Run

    by Yaqui Updated Sep 14, 2012

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    Along this passageway is lots of accessories shops, Arts and Crafts, Food and Beverage, Novelties and Souvenirs, and Specialty Books Stores.

    138 2nd Ave N Ste 500 Nashville, TN 37201

    The statue reads:
    Bulter, a beautiful combination of Springer Spaniel and Black Labrador Retriever, was adopted in 1990 from the Nashville Human Society by the building's owners. He dedicated this alleyway at the threshold with his paw pring and earned the title, The "Canine Bon Vivant" at the many civic and social functions in the upper level residence. Butler, through his daily downtown walks, became one of the most well known canine citizens of Nashville. He died on October 7, 1999 and although this passageway to the river is for people, it will always be Butler's Run.

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    Colonel John Donelson

    by Yaqui Written Sep 15, 2012

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    The Plaque Reads:
    In appreciation of
    the services of
    Colonel John Donelson
    Born in Delaware, 1718.
    Died in Kentucky 1786.

    Distinguished in early life in Virginia as a civil, industrial and military leader.
    Member of the House of Burgesses, iron manufacturer, Lieutenant Colonel of Pittsylvania County and devoted vestryman of Camden Parish.
    Noted surveyor of state boundaries, maker of treaties with the Indians, and revolutionary patriot. Emigrated west in 1779-1780. A leader and "Diarist" of the settlers going by water in; "The good boat adventure from Fort Patrick Henry to the French Salt Spring on Cumberland River."
    Founder of Donelson's Station on Stone's River 1780.
    One of the commissioners holding treaty with the Chickasaw Indians near Nashborough, 1783.
    Member of "The Tennessee Land Company" projecting a settlement in the "Great Bend" of Tennessee River, 1785.
    Lost his life—supposed to have been murdered by the Indian—near Big Barren River, Kentucky, 1786.

    "Distinguished not only in the estimation
    of his fellow citizens, but more excellent
    at home in the family circle" (Putnam)

    Located at 170 1st Avenue North Nashville, TN 37201

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Nashville Off The Beaten Path

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