Historical, Nashville

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  • TN State Capitol
    TN State Capitol
    by Ewingjr98
  • Historical
    by Ewingjr98
  • Capitol in 2011
    Capitol in 2011
    by grandmaR
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    Historic Hotels - Lobby of the Hermitage Hotel

    by TravellerMel Updated Apr 12, 2010

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    Lobby
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    Historic Nashville hotel, opened in 1910, and has been the favorite hotel for celebrities, politicians, sports heroes, gangsters, and locals alike. The hotel lobby is beautiful, and absolutely worth a peek inside if you are in the area. The sunny verandah would be lovely for a wedding...

    Just past the check-in desk, beside the staircase, is a wonderful display of memorabilia of the history of this hotel. Definitely check it out!

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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    Tennessee State Capitol Building

    by Ewingjr98 Written Jun 5, 2009

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    TN State Capitol
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    The Tennessee State Capitol, built from 1845 to 1859, is home to the state's governor and legislature. The original architect, William Strickland, died during construction, and he was placed in a tomb within the building.

    On the capitol grounds you will find various statues and monuments. Most important are the three Tennesseans who became President of the US: Andrew Jackson, Andrew Johnson, and James Polk; while Jackson and Johnson have monuments, President Polk and his wife are actually buried here. You will also find the Sgt. Alvin C. York Memorial, the Tennessee Holocaust Commission Memorial, the Sam Davis Memorial, the Sen. Edward Ward Carmack Memorial, the Memorial to Africans, and the and the Charles Warterfield Reliquary.

    Guided tours are available on weekdays and start from the first floor information desk.

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    Get a map

    by OlenaKyiv Updated Jun 26, 2007

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    I picked up a free Nashville map from Nashville Convention and Visitors Bureau in Parthenon building. It is a two page booklet with Nashville downtown map with marked points of interest. Inside is the short description of the places of interests – historical, cultural and others. On the back there is a map of Nashville with other small towns. The last one is not the best, but enough to figure out directions. I am sure it is possible to find a map in other places in downtown.

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    The bronze statue of Robertson and Donelson

    by OlenaKyiv Updated Jun 25, 2007

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    The bronze statue of Robertson and Donelson
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    The bronze statue of pioneers James Robertson and John Donelson was created by Nashville sculptor Puryear Mims in 1962 for placement inside the stockade of the replicated (1930) Fort Nashborough overlooking the Cumberland River. The statuary's symbolism is revealed in Robertson's figure (left) shouldering the civilization-building axe as he shakes the hand of Donelson, who holds a rifle and was captain of The Good Boat Adventure leading the flatboat flotilla over treacherous waterways to join Robertson's 1779 overland party on the Cumberland bluffs on April 24, 1780.

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    Fort Nashborough

    by OlenaKyiv Written Jun 25, 2007

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    The cabin in Fort Nashborough
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    In the building of Fort Nashborough were used techniques of 1790s: buildt with round logs stack on each other and with a clay between logs. Inside of the cabins you will some household things such as stools, bed, some items of clothes. Historically two-store buildings were on each side of the fort to see from far Indians coming to the Fort. Settlers almost didn't leave the Fort's walls not to get into the hands of Indidans.

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    • Historical Travel
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    Fort Nashborough

    by OlenaKyiv Updated Jun 25, 2007

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    Fort Nashborough


    Log fort on the bank of Cumberland River located near the place where in 1779 first settlers of Nashville built wood log fort. The present fort is not an original, it is the re-creation built in 1962 and in size is 4 times smaller than original.

    The entrance is free and tours are self guided, you will find some plaques with information. Don't worry there are not so many of them, so you won't get tired from reading.

    The fort looks real and gives the chance to uderstand how people lived in the end of 18th century.

    Hours: Tuesday - Sunday 9 am-5 pm.

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    Tenessee Flags

    by OlenaKyiv Written Jun 25, 2007

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    Tenessee Flags


    Located on each end of the River Walk are clusters of Tennessee flags. Each cluster contains one large 12 x 18-foot flag, and eight smaller 5 x 8-foot flags for a total of 18 Tennessee flags. The 16 small flags represent Tennessee being the 16th state admitted to the union June 1, 1796. The two large flags represent the states bicentennial celebration.

    The American flag is not flown in the mall since the park is an extension of the State Capitol, which flies the American Flag high above the Bicentennial Capitol Mall State Park.

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    The River Walk

    by OlenaKyiv Written Jun 25, 2007

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    The River Walk
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    On the South of Bicentennial Mall under railway trestle there is an area containing 31 vertical water fountains, one for each of the predominant waterways in Tennessee - The River Walk.

    The River Walk is accented with a bowed and arched granite wall with inscriptions about Tennessee's waterways.

    The fountains operate from April through October and is a great sanctuary for children from a summer heat.

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    • Family Travel
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Tennessee State Capitol

    by OlenaKyiv Written Jun 25, 2007

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    Tennessee State Capitol


    The historic Tennessee State Capitol, designed by William Strickland, stands today much as it did when completed in 1859. Several areas have been restored to their 19th century appearance.

    Cost: Free

    Hours: Monday-Firday 9 am - 4 pm. Closed all major holidays.

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    Path of Volunteers

    by OlenaKyiv Written Jun 25, 2007

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    Path of Volunteers


    As part of the Bicentennial celebration, many Tennesseans reserved their place in history by purchasing commemorative bricks. These granite bricks with their names are placed along the Path of Volunteers, a central tree-lined granite walkway extending down both sides of the park and terminating at the Court of 3 Stars.

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    The Walkway of Counties

    by OlenaKyiv Written Jun 25, 2007

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    The plaque of Granger county


    The planning area adjacent to the walkway is essentially level at the south end and becomes progressively more rolling and hilly rising to the highest mounds as the path reaches the northern part. These lands represent the varied topography across the state from the west to the mountains of the east. Native trees, shrubs, ferns, grasses and wildflowers along the walkway represent the diverse vegetation found across the state.

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    The Walkway of Counties

    by OlenaKyiv Updated Jun 25, 2007

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    The Walkway of Counties


    It seems to me that designer(s) of the Mall have a lot of imagination, great ideas, and love to Tennessee. One of these creations is the Walkway of Counties located on the east side of the park and that begins from the Court of 3 Stars leading south. The walkway is divided at points representing the three grand divisions of Tennessee – West, Middle, and East. Along the path are circular granite plaques, one for each Tennessee county with information about the time of county’s establishment, its sq. footage, and some moments of county’s history.

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    • Historical Travel

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    95 bells

    by OlenaKyiv Updated Jun 25, 2007

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    95 bells of the Court of 3 Stars
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    The Court of 3 Stars is surrounded with a 95-bell carillon representing Tennessee's musical heritage. The 95 bells represent the citizens of Tennessee's 95 counties. A 96th bell, known as the answer bell, is located on the grounds of the State Capitol and rings in answer to the 95 bells, symbolizing government answering to the people. The carillons are the largest in the world.

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    The Court of 3 Stars

    by OlenaKyiv Updated Jun 25, 2007

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    The Court of 3 Stars
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    The Court of 3 Stars located at the northern end near Jefferson Street. Made of red, white and blue granite, this area represents the three grand divisions of the state - East, Middle and West Tennessee.

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    The World War II Memorial

    by OlenaKyiv Written Jun 25, 2007

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    The World War II Memorial
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    The World War II Memorial has large granite markers that give a brief history of such historic events as the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the Battle of the Bulge, as well as scenes from here in Tennessee by using sand blasting engravings of actual photographs on the markers.

    Markers have the name to each of event, among them are Gratitude, Triumph, Courage, Conviction, Terror, Outrage, Resolve, Valor, Fortitude, Victory.

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