Unique Places in Tennessee

  • Old Barn
    Old Barn
    by monica71
  • Biltmore Estate
    Biltmore Estate
    by monica71
  • 6th Ohio of Ammen's brigade
    6th Ohio of Ammen's brigade
    by mtncorg

Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Tennessee

  • soundsgoodtome's Profile Photo

    Foster Falls Campground

    by soundsgoodtome Updated Feb 22, 2004

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    Foster Falls is a very nice, small campground with lots of hiking and of course, a waterfall. In front of the falls is a large, round pool that is a great place to cool off in the heat of summer. Watch out though, the rocks are slippery and the water is very cold, even when the air temperature is 100 degrees. There are many hiking trails, many of which start and end at or near the falls and follow the stream for a while or follow the mountain ridges. There are some great views from the tops of several mountains, but you may have to hike a while to find them. Also, Foster Falls is an excellent place for rock climbing, one of the best places in the Southeast from what I have heard. Many of the campers here come exclusively for this, and it is interesting to watch some of these guys and gals climb for a while. Maybe one day I'll try myself. The campground is very secluded and out there but it is not too far away from civilization at the same time, being 10 minutes from Jasper and 45 minutes from Chattanooga. A great place for a weekend excursion in the outdoors. If you go in July, look for the wild blackberries that ripen at this time, They are delicious. The website has lots of info on the campground and climbing done here, including directions. The campground is somewhat unique in that it is not privately owned nor is it a state park. Rather it is a wilderness area owned by TVA.

    Foster Falls and the swimming hole
    Related to:
    • Camping
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Hiking and Walking

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    An Authentic Living Mountain Frontier Village

    by Sassy417 Written Nov 22, 2003

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    At John Rice Irwin's Museum of Appalachia is a step back into the past. Full of history, the museum provides the public with a quarter million relics from our past. Farm, animals, and much more. The pioneer village, farm and museum is located in Norris, TN. just 16 mi. north of Knoxville on I-75, take Clinton/Norris Exit#122, then one mile on Hwy. 61. Open to the public, daily the year round' during daylight hours.

    A Living Mountain Village, Museum of Appalachia
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

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    Ramsey Cascades

    by Sassy417 Written Nov 21, 2003

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    If you like hiking, you'll love this point of interest. The trail is a beautiful continual gradual climb among record size trees crossing 2 foot bridges and ending up at the third foot log at the bottom of this beautiful cascade. Ramsey is the single largest cascading waterfall within the Smokies and is certainly worth the effort it takes to get there.
    Traveling out of Gatlinburg on Hwy.73, North approx. 4 mi. turn off to the right at the Greenbriar Ranger Station. This road extends back one mile passing the ranger station on the rt. Apprx 3 mi past station will be a cutoff to left crossing a bridge and extending back another 2 miles to parking lot and trailhead. Total distance: 8.0 mi

    RAMSEY CASCADES
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • Janyka's Profile Photo

    watch for slippery boulders

    by Janyka Written Feb 25, 2003

    Cades Cove
    You can see preserved historic settler homes, barns and churches in 11-mile loop, which follows the old wagon road trail.
    I only drove to the beginning of the loop of Cades Cove. It was packed with tourist but I enjoyed the scenic drive along the river. In one place there were nice cascades and a parking place. I stopped there as most of the people if I knew what is going to happed I would drive away as fast as I could. One moment I read a warning board, that it is danger to swim there and no longer after I was hugging a large bolder to pull myself out of river J. I must say it was nice bath but probably I would enjoy it more without hiking boots and jacket.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • Janyka's Profile Photo

    get up early

    by Janyka Written Feb 25, 2003

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    RAMSAY CASCADES TRAIL
    Distance: 4 miles one-way
    Difficulty: easy, moderate
    Length: 1 ½ hour one-way
    The trail starts of the dirt road that gets narrower for the first mile after that it becomes a gradually assenting skinny path winding through woods crossing the cascades river twice over skinny wooden bridges. I would probably tell a lay to say it was the height of the waterfalls. Let’s say it was big J and gorgeous.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • Janyka's Profile Photo

    get a good map

    by Janyka Written Feb 25, 2003

    The trails I hiked

    W PRONG LITTLE PIGEON RIVER
    Starting point: Chimney Tops picnic area
    - Beautiful walk through the riverbed. If you have kids or enjoy climbing on and jumping from stone to stone over the running river and its cascades this is definitely place for you. Not many people go very far so if you like to explore shortly you might be left on your own for miles. The parking lot was almost full but I spent more than hour walking up the river and met only free fishermen. Some places are pretty tricky and don’t let you get bored fast, maybe wet J.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Riverboat Excursion

    by Bwana_Brown Written Feb 25, 2003

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    On the Monday evening after the first day of the conference, an excursion had been arranged on the General Jackson paddleboat, leaving Opryland for a cruise on the Cumberland River into Nashville. We had the top deck booked for the conference attendees as the boat pulled out and this was followed by an excellent dinner below decks. Once our appetites had been sated, we were royally entertained by a group of dancers and singers as they performed the "Rhythm of the River" - a history of the music that has developed from New Orleans, to Memphis to Nashville. It was an excellent performance with just the right amount of audience participation. Photo of the General Jackson taken from their brochure because I could not get enough "distance" to take a proper shot myself.

    Related to:
    • Cruise

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  • jake22's Profile Photo

    Tour the small towns in the...

    by jake22 Written Sep 7, 2002

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    Tour the small towns in the Shelbyville area: Bell Buckle, Wartrace and Lynchburg:
    Lynchburg is the home of the Jack Daniels Distillery and many antique shops.
    Bell Buckle also has many antique shops
    Wartrace is known for the horse farms in the surrounding area.
    The horse farms around Shelbyville and Wartrace look a lot like the horse farms of Ocala.
    All the old small towns in Middle Tennessee are trying to become antique and heritage centers

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    Tour Jack Daniel’s distillery...

    by jake22 Written Sep 7, 2002

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    Tour Jack Daniel’s distillery in Lynchburg, follow the steps in making Tennessee Sipping Whiskey. They can’t let you taste the product since Moore county is dry. They will give you some Lemonade at the end of the tour. Very interesting.

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    For anyone who likes to visit...

    by WFTR Updated Aug 26, 2002

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    For anyone who likes to visit commercial caves, I recommend Appalachian Caverns. When I was doing sport caving in East Tennessee, I went into the cave twice. At that time, the landowner wouldn't allow people into the dry entrance, and the groups that I was with entered through the stream. In the mid-90's, the land was sold to a group that wanted to develop the cave. They also did archeological digs in the entrance area, but I've forgotten what they found. I've done the commercial tour once a few years ago.

    The cave is moderately sized and moderately well decorated. The developers built a good tour with bridges over the water in some places. I haven't done many commercial tours, but the bridges are somewhat unique among cave tours. It was strange walking along a bridge, looking over, and seeing a ledge over which I had crawled many years ago. Otherwise, they do a good job of giving one the feel of a big room. This cave doesn't have all of the spectacular formations of some commercial caves. The developers compensate by emphasizing the educational aspects of the tour.

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    For travelers who love...

    by WFTR Written Aug 26, 2002

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    For travelers who love waterfalls and are willing to take one to two hours from their driving while driving from Nashville to Knoxville on I-40, I strongly recommend Burgess Falls. The falls are in a state natural area about 10 miles south of I-40 at the Burgess Falls Road/Willow Avenue exit in Cookeville, Tennessee. The drive to the falls is easy, but one must be watchful for a left fork on the way. When I was there last (in 1999), the road was well marked.

    The trail to the main falls is about 3/4 of a mile long. It follows the Falling River and is a fun little trail in its own right. The 'upper falls' are mostly a series of cascades. The 'middle falls' are impressive by themselves. The 'lower falls' which I call the main falls are awesome. I've seen great blue herons and a few other birds from the trail.

    No one will ever plan a vacation around Burgess Falls. The park's total length of official trails is maybe two miles. However, anyone in the area and looking for a neat little side trip cannot do better than by seeing this park. (I have a little longer write-up at Burgess Falls on my homepage.)

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    Once you leave Nashville,...

    by NanKizziah Written Aug 26, 2002

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    Once you leave Nashville, Memphis and maybe Knoxville, the whole state is 'off the beaten path!' The Tri-Cities area (Kingsport, Johnson City and Elizabethton) offers lots of things for families and history-lovers. Hands-On Museum in Johnson City, Historic Boonesborough, the Watauga Settlement in Elizabethton. The scenery is beautiful and the people friendly, even if they're NOT used to tourists!

    A little trip down our road with a fishing stop by our Puncheon Creek will definitely take you off the beaten path. You might even find my daughter's family with a line in the water!

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    might want to take 127 north...

    by Homemaker Written Aug 26, 2002

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    might want to take 127 north to pall mall down to the wolf river...Alvin C. Yorks birthplace and stomping grounds...the park with the old gristmill is a must...also while ya there go to wolfs nursery...wonderful hearty plants can be found there at reasonable prices and the employees are helpful and a joy to chat with...also take a drive down state road 85...takes ya thru wilder some beautiful country there very scenic...and if ya go to daniel boone national forest...take the road to peters mountain...awesome sites there

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  • darthmilmo's Profile Photo

    Wonder deep into the Lost Sea

    by darthmilmo Written Aug 26, 2002

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    Located near Sweetwater, TN, the Lost Sea is not only a national landmark, it is the second largest underground lake in the world (the first one is somewhere in Africa, Nairobi I think). Legend has it that a young boy found this cave early in the 20th century. When he told his father, they just laugh at him. A couple of months later, he returned with others only to find that the waters had receeded (it occassionally floods and that is why he happen to find it). The underground lake remained hidden for over half a century until it was rediscovered and later opened to the public. Oh, the depth of the lake is still in debate with no one knowing the depth for sure. The have inplanted trout into the lake in hopes that they will find the exit, but the fish never did. Now in days, they are just a tourist attraction kept alive by feeding them buckets of food. Note: The actual lake was the only lost thing in this cave. The cave itself has been inhabited on and off for thousands of years. (look at the travelogue for pictures on the Lost Sea)

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  • If you don't mind a long hike...

    by tommcole Written Aug 26, 2002

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    If you don't mind a long hike up a montain trail (it is paved but very steep) then you should check out Look Rock. The view is wonderful. Take 321 from Maryville torwards Townsend - Cades Cove and watch for the signs leading you to Foothill's Parkway. Go up the parkway fallowing the signs that lead you to Look Rock, it is about 11 miles up the parkway, when you come to the 25 mph speed zone start watching for the sign that says Look Rock - Tower Trail. It is a long climb but it is well worth it. Keep in mind that there is no gas stations along the Parkway so watch for the little Amco station at Walland and stop there for gas and picnic supplies (they sell everything you will need). After your long climb go back the same way you came and you will find a road to your right. This road takes you to a camp grounds (a nice place to camp if you want the experiance without being crowded) and a lovely picnic area that you can enjoy your lunch at. Pictures from the Look Rock air quility control station can be found on the web at http://www.aqd.nps.gov/ard/parks/grsm/lookRockWeather.htm this site features a web cam and you can also get up to date wheather conditions from this site.

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Tennessee Hotels

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Tennessee Off The Beaten Path

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