Capitol, Austin

21 Reviews

Know about this? Rate It!

hide
  • Plaque on the Texas Rangers Monument
    Plaque on the Texas Rangers Monument
    by Stephen-KarenConn
  • Texas Ranger Statue
    Texas Ranger Statue
    by Stephen-KarenConn
  • Texas Cowboy Monument
    Texas Cowboy Monument
    by Stephen-KarenConn
  • Stephen-KarenConn's Profile Photo

    Confederate Monument

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Jan 11, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Confederate Monument
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: Like all Southern States, Texas is justly proud of the men from the Lone Star State who paid the ultimate sacrifice in defending their homeland against the invading Federal armies during the War for Southern Independence.

    The inscription on the Confederate Monument in front of the State Capitol reads:
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .

    DIED
    FOR STATES RIGHTS
    GUARANTEED UNDER THE CONSTITUTION
    THE PEOPLE OF THE SOUTH, ANIMATED BY THE SPIRIT OF 1776, TO PRESERVE THEIR RIGHTS, WITHDREW FROM THE FEDERAL COMPACT IN 1861. THE NORTH RESORTED TO COERCION.
    THE SOUTH, AGAINST OVERWHELMING NUMBERS AND RESOURCES,
    FOUGHT UNTIL EXHAUSTED.
    DURING THE WAR THERE WERE TWENTY TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTY SEVEN ENGAGEMENTS.
    IN EIGHTEEN HUNDRED AND EIGHTY TWO OF THESE, AT LEAST ONE REGIMENT TOOK PART.
    NUMBER OF MEN ENLISTED:
    CONFEDERATE ARMIES 600,000; FEDERAL ARMIES 2,859,132
    LOSSES FROM ALL CAUSES:
    CONFEDERATE, 437,000; FEDERAL, 485,216

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Stephen-KarenConn's Profile Photo

    Memorial to "Terry's Texas Rangers"

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Feb 20, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Texas Ranger Statue
    4 more images

    Favorite thing: Seventeen monuments grace the 22 acres of the Texas State Capitol grounds. On these "General" pages I will highlight several of those monuments and a few other points of interest on and around the capitol. grounds.

    The TERRY'S TEXAS RANGERS MONUMENT features a bronze statue, by Pompeo Coppini, portraying one of Terry's Texas Rangers astride a spirited horse. In 1861, during the War for Southern Independence, Texas Rangers were mustered at Houston after Benjamin Terry and Thomas Lubbock's call for volunteers. Ten companies of 100 men each were formally activated as the 8th Texas Cavalry. During the next four years they participated in many engagements defending the Confederate States from Northern aggression.

    The monument was erected in 1907, by surviving comrades. A plaque on the side reads:
    LAST ORDER
    Headquarters Calvary Corps.
    April 24, 1865

    GALLANT COMRADES
    You have fought your fight. Your task is done. During four years of struggle for liberty you have exhibited courage, fortitude and devotion. You are the victors of more than 200 sternly contested fields. You have participated in more than 1000 conflicts of arms.

    You are heroes, veterans, patriots. The bones of your comrades mark the battlefields of Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi. You have done all that human exertions could accomplish. In bidding you adieu I desire to tender my thanks for gallantry in battle. Your fortitude under suffering, and the devotion at all times to the holy cause you have done so much to maintain. I desire also to express my gratitude for your kind feeling you have seen fit to extend to myself and to invoke upon you the blessings of our Heavenly Father in the Cause of Freedom:
    Comrades in Arms, I bid you farewell.

    Joseph Wheeler
    Leut - Gen. Commanding Calvary Corps.
    Army of Tennessee

    Terry's Texas Rangers Monuments.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Stephen-KarenConn's Profile Photo

    Boy Scout's Statue of Liberty Monument

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Feb 9, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Boy Scout's Statue of Liberty Monument
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: This Statue of Liberty replica was erected in 1951 by the Boy Scouts of America. During the 1950's and 60's, the Boy Scouts worked hard to donate about 200 such replicas of Lady Liberty to cities and towns across America.

    The bronze miniature Statue of Liberty, about eight feet high, is mounted on a native limestone base. It was presented to the State of Texas by the Boy Scouts as a "pledge of everlasting fidelity and loyalty." The statue was relocated from the south grounds of the State Capitol to a new pedestal on the north grounds in 1997. A time-capsule buried nearby is to be opened by Scout officials in 2076. I'd like to be around to see what the capsule contains.

    The Statue of Liberty

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Stephen-KarenConn's Profile Photo

    World War I Veterans Monument

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Feb 9, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    World War I Veterans Monument

    Favorite thing: The World War I Veterans Monument was erected 1961 by the membership of the Department of Texas, Veterans of Foreign Wars. The monument is constructed of Texas "Sunset Red" granite.

    Instead of naming the Texans who fought in the conflict it lists the barracks and auxiliaries that participated in the monument's erection. Although the monument is dedicated to the memory of World War I veterans, it seems to me that the real honor is given to the organizations responsible for building the monument. That's just my personal observation.

    Texans and the First World War

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Stephen-KarenConn's Profile Photo

    Hood's Texas Brigade Monument

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Feb 9, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hood's Texas Brigade Monument

    Favorite thing: This imposing monument to Hood's Texas Brigade was erected 1910 by surviving comrades and friends.

    On the gray granite shaft are hand-carved quotes Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America, General Robert E. Lee, and others. The monument is topped by the bronze figure of a Confederate soldier, by sculptor Pompeo Coppini.

    The monument stands as a memorial to the members of John B. Hood's Texas Brigade Army of Northern Virginia. Some 4,000 soldiers in the division died in defense of the South during the War Between the States. Names of the principle battles in which they were engaged are inscribed on the monument's base.

    Hood's Texas Brigade

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Stephen-KarenConn's Profile Photo

    Heroes of the Alamo Monument

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Feb 9, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Heroes of the Alamo Monument

    Favorite thing: When I saw this monument to the Heroes of the Alamo on the Texas State Capitol grounds it reminded me of my home state of Tennessee. That's because 32 of the brave men who died at the Alamo - more than from any other state - were natives of Tennessee. The most famous of these was a former Tennessee Congressman, David Crockett.

    Texans are justly proud of the 187 gallant men who lost their lives at the Alamo in one of the most heroic fights in history. Tennesseans should also be proud to know that without the efforts of the "Tennessee Volunteers" there might not be a Texas today. Appropriately, the first governor of the independent Republic of Texas was Sam Houston, a former governor of Tennessee.

    This monument is a bronze statue of a Texan holding a muzzle-loader rifle, standing atop a Texas granite base. In 1836 the 187 defenders of the Alamo fort, under the command of William B. Travis, laid down their lives during a 13-day siege. They were sorely outnumbered by Mexican General Santa Anna's army of more than 5,000. Names of the Texans who died in the battle are inscribed upon the four granite supports of the monument.

    To learn more of the Tennessee/Texas connection, click on the link below.

    Tennesseans at the Alamo

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Stephen-KarenConn's Profile Photo

    Capitol Artesian Well and Drinking Fountain

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Jan 26, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Stephen Takes a Drink
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: Two Historic Fountains, made of elaborate cast iron, Offer refreshment to the passer-by near the mid point of the Great Walk. They were manufactured by J. W. Fiske of New York in 1904 and brought to the Texas Capitol where they were placed in oval pools.

    The fountains were removed and the ovals converted into flower beds in the 1940s. However, in 1996 reproduction fountains were installed and the oval pools reconstructed according to the original plan.

    In this picture I'm quenching my thirst at one of the fountains.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Stephen-KarenConn's Profile Photo

    Cannons on Capitol Grounds

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Jan 26, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Cannon in front of the Texas State Capitol
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: Five Historic Cannons are displayed beside the Great Walk on the Texas State Capitol grounds. Two 24-pounder howitzer cannons were presented by Major General Thomas Jefferson Chambers to the Republic of Texas in 1836. Two 12-pounder light field guns, cast in bronze, were displayed on the south lawn in 1864, near the end of the War Between the States, and were acquired "to maintain order." The fifth cannon is of wrought iron and dates to 1865. All of the cannons are original except for their wooden casings, which have been replaced with more durable metal.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Stephen-KarenConn's Profile Photo

    Texas State Capitol Fence

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Jan 26, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Texas State Capitol Fence
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: This ornate wrought iron fence on a stone base surrounds the Texas State Capitol Grounds . It was designed by William Munro Johnson, responsible for landscaping the capitol grounds, for both a decorative and a practical purpose. The fence encloses and defines the grounds in elegant fashion, and also originally served to keep wandering Livestock off Capitol Square.

    The Texas State Capitol Fence originally incorporated eleven gates, six for carriages and five for pedesterians. The fence was completely reconditioned in 1996, at which time new pedesterian gates were added for ease of access. The original fence was painted black with decorative gold leaf. Now it is simply painted in metallic black and gold colors.

    Texas Capitol Grounds

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Stephen-KarenConn's Profile Photo

    Tribute to Texas Schoolchildren

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Jan 26, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Texas School Children Monument
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: This monument on the grounds of the Texas Capitol in Austin depicts six children on a school field trip to the Capitol. School children in more than 600 Texas schools raised the funds necessary to complete the statues. The life-sized bronze figures, installed at ground level, are the work of sculptor Lawrence Ludtke.

    Tribute to Texas Children was dedicated in June 1998. It is said to be the only monument of it's type in the United States.

    News of Texas School Children Monument

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Study Abroad

    Was this review helpful?

  • Stephen-KarenConn's Profile Photo

    Ten Commandments Monument

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Jan 26, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ten Commandments Monument

    Favorite thing: No doubt the most controversial monument on the Texas State Capitol grounds is this one to the Ten Commandments. The text, sacred to both Jews and Christians, was reportedly handed down by God to Moses on Mt. Sinai in ancient times. It is the moral code upon which most of the laws of western civilization are based.

    Although the overwhelming majority of Texans approve of the Ten Commandments being displayed on the Capitol grounds, a small minority tend to become very shrill in denouncing anything religious other than their own religion of Secular Humanism.

    This small granite monument of the Ten Commandments was at the center of a 2005 U.S. Supreme Court case, Van Orden v. Perry, in which the display was challenged as unconstitutional. In late June 2005, the Court ruled that the display was not unconstitutional and that the monument could remain.

    Hooray for the Supreme Court doing what was right.

    Supreme Court Ten Commandments Decision

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Stephen-KarenConn's Profile Photo

    Tyler Rose

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Jan 26, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Yellow Rose of Texas
    3 more images

    Favorite thing: Tyler, a city in northeastern Texas, is famous for it's roses. Nurserymen from Tyler ship their roses and rootstock all over the world.

    Here on the State Capitol grounds in Austin is a rose garden which features the Tyler Rose, which was developed from a native flower. In the early 1800s, the Tyler Rose was planted by Cherokee Indians to mark their trails.

    On a marker in the capitol rose garden is the statement: "The beauty of the Tyler Rose is an example of what happens when God and man work together."

    Tyler Rose Festival

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Stephen-KarenConn's Profile Photo

    Pearl Harbor Monument

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Jan 26, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Pearl Harbor Monument, Texas State Capitol
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: This is another newer monument on the Texas State Capitol grounds, erected in 1989 by the Pearl Harbor Survivors of Texas.

    The Pearl Harbor Monument is placed in honor of the men and women of Texas serving the United States armed forces who were present on the island of Oahu, Territory of Hawaii, on September 7, 1941, when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor. This unprovoked attack was the catalyst that pushed the United States into the Second World War.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Stephen-KarenConn's Profile Photo

    Texas Pioneer Woman Monument

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Jan 26, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Texas Pioneer Woman Monument
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: One of the newer monuments on the Texas State Capitol grounds, the statue honoring the Texas Pioneer Woman was ereted in 1998 by the Daughters of the Republic of Texas, District VIII.

    The statue is a life-sized bronze figure by Linda Sioux Henley depicting a young pioneer mother with baby on her arm. The statue stands atop a Texas Sunset Red granite pedestal.

    Linda Sioux Henley

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Stephen-KarenConn's Profile Photo

    Texas Cowboy Monument

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Jan 26, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Texas Cowboy Monument
    2 more images

    Favorite thing: I personally liked this Texas Cowboy Monument, a tribute to the "rough and romantic riders of the range." Maybe that's because I tend to be a little rough, romantic and rangey myself. GRIN!

    The bronze statue was presented to the State of Texas by Constance Whitney, the notable American sculptor. It represents the artist's portrayal of a typical Texas cowboy riding a rearing horse. Texas is known as the "native home of the cowboy." The monument was unveiled by Governor Pat M. Neff on January 17, 1925.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Austin

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

75 travelers online now

Comments

Other Favorites in Austin

View all Austin hotels