Canyon Warnings and Dangers

  • Be careful! (not my pic)
    Be careful! (not my pic)
    by Bunsch
  • It's hot and dry (not my pic)
    It's hot and dry (not my pic)
    by Bunsch
  • Spring 2011 Texas wildfire (not my pic)
    Spring 2011 Texas wildfire (not my pic)
    by Bunsch

Most Recent Warnings and Dangers in Canyon

  • Bunsch's Profile Photo

    Wildfires are deadly

    by Bunsch Written May 26, 2011

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    Things to remember about Palo Duro Canyon: The name derives from the hard woods of the trees which grow in some profusion throughout the canyon. But during times of drought, all that wood is an ideal combustible material, and canyons have strange wind patterns which can greatly enhance the speed and ferocity of the burn once a fire gets started. If you have any sort of open flame, or if you smoke, you put the land at risk unless you are extremely careful.

    Spring 2011 Texas wildfire (not my pic)
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • National/State Park
    • Camping

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  • Bunsch's Profile Photo

    Things can get hot in a hurry

    by Bunsch Updated May 26, 2011

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    Things to remember about Palo Duro Canyon: In a place with literally hundreds of miles of hiking, biking, and bridle trails, and a climate which begins with "pleasant" and can swiftly become "torrid," it makes sense to pay particular attention to the admonition to carry two quarts of water per person on the trail, and to pack out what you pack in. There are large thermometers at every trail head to alert you to the present heat index.

    It's hot and dry (not my pic)
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Horse Riding
    • Cycling

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  • Bunsch's Profile Photo

    The bottom of a canyon = flash floods

    by Bunsch Written May 26, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Things to keep in mind about Palo Duro Canyon: There are six river crossings on the Park Road. Each one has a flood gauge, indicating the height of the water which is presently flowing over the road (even during drought conditions in May 2011, one of the crossings was under water). DO NOT DRIVE INTO MORE THAN SIX INCHES OF WATER! People get killed every year by thinking their SUV can easily ford some stream. Water levels can rise precipitously and unexpectedly and you really need to be on higher ground when that happens.

    Be careful! (not my pic)
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Family Travel

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Canyon Warnings and Dangers

Reviews and photos of Canyon warnings and dangers posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Canyon sightseeing.

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