Unique Places in Dallas

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    Artists Bianca Elise and Cathy Drennan
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Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Dallas

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    Cotton Bowl Parade

    by ATXtraveler Written Jan 1, 2005

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    Every New Year's Eve, to celebrate the following day's football game, the Cotton Bowl organization throws a parade which features 20 of the best high school bands in the country. Also, the two college bands and the Kilgore College Rangerettes are a big draw.

    This parade marches the Fair Park complex, right off Grand Ave. and 2nd Ave.

    3pm New Year's Eve, Admission is free, however parking is $8 per car.

    Related to:
    • Theme Park Trips
    • Family Travel

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    Beilharz and Wilson Blocks

    by grandmaR Updated Nov 17, 2005

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    On my visit to Dallas in 1997, the bus stopped by these houses. I've always been fascinated by Victorian architecture, so I wanted to come back here, but I didn't know where is was or what it was called.

    The two blocks are entered in the National Register of Historic Places.

    The Historical Sign for the Wilson Block says:

    "Swiss native Jacob Nussbaumer, a colonist in the Pioneer La Reunion settlement of the Dallas area, purchased this land prior to the Civil War. In 1898, his wife Dorothea and children sold it to her niece Henrietta Frichot Wilson (1864-1953), the daughter of La Reunion settlers.

    "Henrietta and her husband Frederick P. Wilson (1863-1923) built their residence at this site in 1899 and later constructed six additional homes as rental property. Together the houses were the center of a residential area known as the Wilson block of Swiss Avenue. The neighborhood was the home of many early Dallas leaders, including Charles D. Hill, who became one of the area's prominent architects, and Dr. Theodore L E,. Arnold, an early Dallas ophthamologist whos son Charles pioneered in microphotography.
    "The various architectural styles represented in the hostoric Wilson Block reflect Victorian and Queen Anne influences. The homes feature similarities in composition, including frame construction, clapboard siding, decorative shingle patterns, gabled roofs and intricate ornamentation.

    "Today the Wilson Block serves as a reminder of Dallas' rich heritage and early development."

    The Historical Sign for the Beilharz Block says:

    "The Beilharz Block is named after Theodore Beilharz, an early settler who built the Beilharz House and carriage house located at 2800 Swiss Avenue. Mrs. Beilharz was a sister to Mrs. Frederick Wilson, whose house anchors the Wilson Block. All the other structures on this block were built between 1887 - 1901 within a mile of the site and were moved and restored by the Meadows Foundation in 1984 - 1985 to serve as offices for non-profit community organization."

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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    Dallas Museum for Holocaust Studies

    by keeweechic Written May 25, 2004

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    This Museum has been set up as a dedication to the 6 million Jews who perished during the Holocaust. They have a boxcar where you enter through which actually transported the Jewish victims to the concentration camps. On display are documents, photos, films from some of the survivors as well as artefacts from the death camps. There is a chapel and a memorial which lists the concentration camps but survivor and victim information. Also you will find a library of over 2,000 books which include periodicals and European government books. The Museum is dedicated to keeping the memory alive of the atrocities that took place during WWII in the hopes that it will never happen again.

    The Museum is in the bottom floor of the Jewish Community Center.

    Address : 7900 Northaven Rd, Dallas

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    Road To Freedom

    by keeweechic Updated Jun 17, 2004

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    The sculptures show Africans, warriors, griots, guardians and freed slaves in various poses. They were created to depict a story which told of the road from slavery to freedom. Various facial and physical emotions are portrayed. Although small, the park I feel has a great significance in Dallas’ history. This is one of the largest Freedman Cemeteries in the country.

    Location : Freedman’s Memorial - corner of Lemmon Ave and Central Expressway in Dallas

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    Texas Theater

    by keeweechic Updated Sep 12, 2006

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    Well any JFK assassination supporter will know the significance of this theatre. This was where Lee Harvey Oswald was captured in 1963 after he assassinated President Kennedy. Apparently Oswald felt like seeing a movie after the assassination but he didn't want to pay for it, so he just walked right on into the theatre. The teller called the police and 12 squad cars arrived within minutes to arrest him.

    In 1965 the owners tried to modernise and covered the elaborate walls with stucco. The Oak Cliff foundation bought the theatre in 2001 and began proper renovations.

    Address: 231 W Jefferson Street, Oak Cliff.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

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  • Bibliophiles Take Note!!!!

    by lonestarlola Written Feb 10, 2005

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    Go to the original Half Price Books on E. Northwest Hwy. (just east of Central Expressway, you can see the sign as you whizz by.) It's huge, it's cheap, and it's not Barnes and Noble. Inventory? No, they don't have one of those. This is a treasure hunt, that's where the fun lies. They buy used books all day long and you never know what you'll find. There are also a lot of new books at half price - look at the display tables for these. This place is just amazing, I've spent entire days in there shopping and finding tons of bargains. It's also an ecologically sound company that takes an active interest in the community and its employees, so you can spend your money there and feel good about it. You can't buy anything off the website but it usually has some interesting tidbits posted on it.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Eco-Tourism

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    Dallas Farmer's Market

    by picklegirl Written Dec 15, 2003

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    You can find almost anything here: produce, flowers, Mexican ceramics, wooden armoires, jewelry...you name it, it's here.

    Located in the southeastern corner of the central business district in downtown Dallas at 1010 South Pearl Street.

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    White Rock Lake

    by keeweechic Written Oct 13, 2004

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    White Rock is a small suburb 10 miles north of downtown Dallas. It has the largest public recreation area in Dallas which attracts joggers, cyclists, boaters, fishermen and families all year round. White Rock Park covers an area of 2,115 acres, and White Rock Lake. a man-made reservoir, is the focal point of the park.

    A lot of the park facilities were constructed during the 1930’s by the Civilian Conservation Corps. There are bridges, playgrounds, drinking water fountains, restrooms, and picnic pavilions with more than 200 picnic tables being provided.

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  • Midnight movies at Landmark's Inwood Theatre.

    by Aniega Written Feb 14, 2004

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    This is a bit of shameless self-promotion here, as I work at the Inwood, but every Friday and Saturday night at midnight we show rare, old, cult, or just downright wacky films. We usually give away free movie tickets and a DVD of the featured film, and sometimes we have other prizes as well, like action figures, etc. Plus, there's a bar next door in case you want to get boozed up before a particularly strange film. Good stuff. A perennial favorite is Monty Python and the Holy Grail. The Inwood is located on Lovers Lane near Inwood Road.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

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    Freedman's Memorial

    by keeweechic Written Jun 17, 2004

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    This sculpture park was created to preserve a cemetery which had been initially for over 7000 freed slaves and African Americans. The cemetery was dedicated in 1869 but over the years the cemetery was destroyed completely but urban progress. All the graves and headstones were destroyed during all the construction of the railroad and redeveloping of streets and a lot was used as landfill back in the 1930’s and 1940’s.

    Location : Corner of Lemmon Ave and Central Expressway (Hwy 75) in Dallas

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    Tribal Burial Traditions

    by keeweechic Updated Jun 17, 2004

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    With the development of Central Expressway which lies right next to the cemetery, there was an outcry for respect. When some 1,500 graves were unearthed, Excavators found evidence of burial with traditions which were practiced back in those times. The graves were all facing East. Adults were buried with artifacts such as broken plates, buttons, cowrie shells – all typical of African burial and the children were buried with their play toys. The bodies were all recovered and reinterred.

    Location : Freedman's Memorial - Corner of Lemmon Ave and Central Expressway (Hwy 75) in Dallas

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    Freedman's Memorial Foundation

    by keeweechic Updated Jun 17, 2004

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    A foundation was formed to preserve the heritage and memory of the cemetery. They called for designs for a monument which would be erected on the site and to be known as the Freedman’s Memorial. issued a call for designs of a fitting monument to be erected on the new site,. to be designated the Freedman's Memorial. The competition was won by a Detroit-born sculptor, David Newton.

    Location : Freedman’s Memorial - corner of Lemmon Ave and Central Expressway in Dallas

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    The Entrance

    by keeweechic Written Jun 17, 2004

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    David Newton deisgned 5 huge sculptures of Africans and African American’s to be exhibited over the 1.2 acre park. His aim was to create a park of solitude and reflection for both descendants and visitors. The Entrance portrays a symbolic male and female figure – supposedly the warrior (The Sentinel) and a griot (The Prophetess).

    Location : Freedman’s Memorial - corner of Lemmon Ave and Central Expressway in Dallas

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    Grapevine

    by keeweechic Written Oct 13, 2004

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    Grapevine Texas is one of Tarrant County’s oldest settlements which originated in 1844 and has been recognised by the National Register of Historic Places. You can find it 21 miles northwest of Dallas. The city is both charming for its historical preservation of the downtown area and for popular for the numerous leisure activities both on Lake Grapevine, the various golf courses and the extensive park system with available sporting facilities such as tennis, soccer fields, jogging and biking trails, baseball and softball fields and playground and picnic facilities.

    Grapevine Mills is also a huge drawcard for having over 2 million sqft of shopping and dining under one roof . It is reportedly the largest shopping mall in the southwest. For the Sports person, the Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World is another huge centre for anything you can imagine.

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    Irving

    by keeweechic Updated Oct 13, 2004

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    Irving was a cotton growing region along with truck farming, dairy farming, and poultry production. Farmers often sold their harvests in Dallas. In 1964 the world's largest trucking terminal was built in Irving.

    The Dallas Cowboys football team's stadium is in Irving, so are The Movie Studios. Also Irving is known for Los Colinas, the centre of Irving and 'The Mustangs' - bronzed sculptures which appear to galloping across a granite stream. The Mandalay Canal Walk is in the heart of Las Colinas. There are a number of businesses in the surrounding buildings and hotels. The walk is tree lined and very peaceful – and during the week days many office workers and diners take advantage of the tranquility.

    Irving is about 11 miles west of downtown Dallas.

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