Dealey Plaza Dedication, Dallas

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  • Dealey Plaza
    Dealey Plaza
    by Jim_Eliason
  • Dealey Plaza
    Dealey Plaza
    by Jim_Eliason
  • Dealey Plaza
    Dealey Plaza
    by Jim_Eliason
  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Sixth Floor Museum

    by grandmaR Updated Feb 17, 2012

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Dealey Plaza and School Book blg from Reunion
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    I wasn't going to visit or take a picture of the Texas School Book Depository of infamy, but we were driving by, and I DID at least take a picture looking up at the building (although we didn't visit). There's also a picture of the museum entrance. The third picture is the corner of the building at street level. I personally think a detail or the view from the Reunion Tower is more interesting then the pictures of the whole building from the street which make it look like a big brick block.

    Anyway here is the information, should you desire to go to the museum.

    Admission is to the entire Museum which includes two exhibits, the permanent exhibit on the sixth floor and the Temporary exhibit on the seventh floor.

    ADMISSION ONLY

    Adult $10.00 US
    Senior (ages 65+) $9.00 US
    Student/Child (ages 6-18) $9.00 US
    Children under 6 FREE

    ADMISSION WITH AUDIO TOUR

    Adult $13.00 US
    Senior (ages 65+) $12.00 US
    Student/Child (ages 6-18) $12.00 US
    Children under 6 $3.00 US

    Lisa Simpson the Marketing Coordinator wrote VT an email complaining that I had the wrong hours and the wrong admission prices.

    Prices as of Feb 2012 have risen to:

    Adult — $13.50 U.S.
    Senior (Ages 65+) — $12.50 = U.S.
    Youth (Ages 6-18) = — $12.50 U.S.
    Children = (Ages 0-5) — Free or
    $3.50 U.S. with audio = guide

    She writes:

    Our hours are Monday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Tuesday-Sunday 10 a.m = to 6 p.m. Last ticket sold at 5:15 p.m. For an optimal experience, we = recommend 90 minutes for your visit.

    So be sure to check before you go for the current hours and prices.

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  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    Sixth Floor Museum

    by keeweechic Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sixth Floor Museum (Old Texas School Book Depository). The museum opened 26 years after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas, the museum documents the events that took place on November 22, 1963 on which JFK was shot. It is housed on the 6th floor in the former Texas School Book Depository Building where Lee Harvey Oswald was said to have fired the shots, and the corner of the room where he supposedly stood is just as it was that day except the window is closed.

    The window area has been re-created behind a wall of glass. There are photos and videos showing various aspects of Kennedy's presidency and an audio tour. EarthCam has positioned an Internet camera in the southeast window on the sixth floor of the former Texas School Book Depository in Dallas.

    Open 9.00am - 6.00pm every day.

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  • JFK - Required Sites

    by EdwinWatson Updated Jun 12, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Unless you are a hardcore conspiracy theorist, this is a quick yet essential side trip that can bee accomplished in about an hour or so. Do a quick drive through Dealy Plaza, and notice the X painted on the road which marks the location of the car at the time of the assasination and take a peek at the "Grassy Knoll." Find a garage or a lot to park in and do a quick run through the museum. The guides in the museum are open, funny, and don't shirk discussions about conspiracy.

    If you want to make it a JFK day, you can then head over to Campisi's Egyptian Lounge (an Italian Restaurant regardless of the name) off Mockingbird Lane and Greenville Ave, where Jack Ruby was a regular customer. The owner, Joe Campisi, was also the first person to visit Ruby after he was arrested. Joe later testified before the Warren Commission due to his relationship with Ruby. The restaurant is still family owned and, heck, you might even run into Amber, Joe's grand daughter, and former Playboy centerfold who still works there occassionally.

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  • VeronicaG's Profile Photo

    Look for Parkland Hospital--JFK's Last Hope

    by VeronicaG Updated Feb 26, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Parkland Hospital-Dallas, Texas

    Although you would not want to stop at Parkland Hospital, where JFK was taken after he was shot, you might just see if from the highway as you leave Dallas.

    Look to the right, nestled in the center of tall buildings you'll just make out the name of the hospital on the face of the edifice.(please click to enlarge). My husband was traveling at 65 miles an hour when I snapped this photo! I was quite surprised to see that it turned out as clear as it did.

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  • VeronicaG's Profile Photo

    X marks The Spot--Where JFK Was Shot

    by VeronicaG Updated Feb 26, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Where the assassination occurred

    The exact spot where the tragedy occurred is marked on the street--somewhat macabre, but specific. This street passes in front of the Texas Book Depository on Elm Street and to the side of Dealey Plaza.

    It's fairly easy to see this mark close up when the traffic is halted by a red light on the corner. Recently, when we revisited the area the "x" was not as clearly marked as before. I think it has to be highlighted every so often.

    UPDATE: In fact, there were two "x's". One showing where the first shot was fired; the second illustrating where the fatal shot occurred.

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  • VeronicaG's Profile Photo

    Texas Book Depository--Sixth Floor Museum

    by VeronicaG Updated Feb 26, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Texas Book Depository--Dallas

    The Texas Book Depository is where Lee Harvey Oswald waited for President Kennedy's caravan to pass. If you count up six floors, the window on the far right corner is where the scene of the crime is located.

    This area is glassed off in the museum, but arranged as it was found on the day of the tragedy.

    So many years have passed since this event, yet visiting the museum was like reliving the day it happened.

    Hearing the broadcasts again, reading the headlines of the newspapers and seeing film clips of President and Mrs. Kennedy from the start of their Dallas visit to the end result brought a wave of sadness. I had always hoped to visit the site someday, but I did not expect to feel this way so many decades later.

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  • VeronicaG's Profile Photo

    The Grassy Knoll--JFK Route

    by VeronicaG Updated Feb 26, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Grassy Knoll--Dallas

    Several witnesses testifying before the Warren Commission, set up to investigate the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, stated they heard shots coming from the grassy knoll.

    A photo at the museum seems to show a puff of smoke emanating from that area. To this day, there is controversy surrounding this theory. The grassy knoll is located northwest of Dealey Plaza.

    It felt so odd actually being in the area of the grassy knoll. For years I've seen this site highlighted in documentaries related to JFK's assassination, but until I visited it was just a vague place of intrigue.

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  • VeronicaG's Profile Photo

    Dealey Plaza--View 3

    by VeronicaG Updated Feb 26, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Dealey Plaza, Dallas

    The cheerful yellow flowers belie the fact that a National tragedy occurred here. I was very glad that it wasn't a gray, somber day.

    Dealey Plaza has been restored to appear as it did on November 23, 1963. Landscaping has been moved or replaced and various other changes made. A plaque reads that it was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1993.

    It's become a place of reflection, from which all of the JFK sites can be viewed. Each time we've visited, the atmosphere is solemn and respectful.

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  • VeronicaG's Profile Photo

    Dealey Plaza--View #2

    by VeronicaG Updated Feb 26, 2008

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    Plaza dedicated to Mr. Dealey
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    Dealey Plaza is located near the main sites of the JFK assassination. The former Texas Book Depository is located nearby on Elm Street and stretches upward for seven floors. This is the building where Lee Harvey Oswald perched at the window in order to target the President.

    The grassy knoll is close by, as well as the street up which Kennedy's caravan progressed. When we toured the area, an "x" marked the spot on the road where the incident occured.

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  • VeronicaG's Profile Photo

    Dealey Plaza--Near The Site Of The Tragedy

    by VeronicaG Updated Feb 26, 2008

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    Dealey Plaza, Dallas
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    Dealey Plaza has always seemed a part of the JFK tragedy. However, the surrounding monuments originally were placed here to honor famous residents of Dallas. Its connection to President Kennedy came many years later.

    The park is named after a former publisher of The Dallas Morning News, George Bannerman Dealey and was completed in 1940. Mr. Dealey was involved in local politics and did much to bring about the renewal of this area. (This information is borrowed from Wikipedia.com)

    The park is well-kept and visited by many tourists following the JFK route. It was mild and sunny in Dallas, so it made for the perfect day to absorb everything related to this historic area.

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  • VeronicaG's Profile Photo

    In Memory of JFK

    by VeronicaG Updated Feb 26, 2008

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    President and Mrs. Kennedy--Dallas

    How could we visit Dallas without honoring the memory of President John F. Kennedy?

    This photo welcomes you to the Sixth Floor Museum, located at the former Texas Book Depository. Photos are not permitted once you enter.

    The museum is filled with news clips, timeline photographs, artifacts and audio recordings related to the JFK assassination. The actual spot where Lee Harvey Oswald targeted the President has been preserved. A surgical gown worn by one of the doctors who tended to JFK can be viewed.

    Most Americans can remember where they were or what they were doing the moment President Kennedy's assassination was made known to them. I was in biology lab when the loudspeaker at school announced that JFK had been shot. Some students cried, while others couldn't believe their ears. It was a dark day for America.

    The museum is open daily from 9 am-6 pm except on Christmas Day. Admission is $10 for adults; $9 for seniors; $9 for students/children ages 6-18; and free for under age 6.

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  • CruisingGoddess's Profile Photo

    The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza

    by CruisingGoddess Written Nov 19, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Texas School Book Depository

    The Sixth Floor Museum is located on the sixth floor of the former Texas School Book Depository in Downtown Dallas, where Lee Harvey Oswald allegedly fired the shots that killed President John F. Kennedy as he passed the building in a motorcade. The museum briefly walks you through the years leading up to his presidency, the events that happened during his presidency, the day of the assassination, what happened to Lee Harvey Oswald until he too is killed, and investigations into JFK’s death. It also covers a few conspiracy theories. The combination of story, photos, video, and audio really brings the entire exhibit to life and makes you feel like you are there when all the events are unfolding. Since JFK was killed before I was born, I never understood why he became so legendary to so many Americans of the generation before me but now I grieved for him too. I also learned that the Governor of Texas rode in JFK’s car and was wounded twice. Lee Harvey Oswald also allegedly killed a Dallas police officer that day. The museum recreated two corners sixth floor as they were on the day JFK was killed. The first corner was the window where Lee Harvey Oswald allegedly perched to fire the shots at JFK’s motorcade. The second corner was where Oswald’s gun was found. From the windows, you can see two white x’s on Houston Street that mark where the shots hit JFK. The museum is a little eerie (maybe because I went in the evening) but very informative. I feel like I shared in a piece of American history. Admission is $10 for adults and parking is $6. There is a small gift shop on the ground floor.

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  • Redlats's Profile Photo

    The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza

    by Redlats Updated Aug 4, 2006

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    The Texas Book Depository Building

    Where were you at lunch time on November 22, 1963? I was in Grade 8 and was at home for lunch. Nobody could fathom that anybody would want to harm the popular President John F. Kennedy, so the whole world was in shock. I returned to school after lunch, but our teachers never came to teach to us.

    My first trip to Dallas is more than forty years later. Of course we have to see the JFK museum. Does it ever bring back memories! There is a wall where a minute by minute description is shown for events of November 22. Where was Oswald before the shooting? Why did the cop who met him in the hallway of the Texas bookstore just a minute or two after the shooting let him go? I had forgotten that Oswald killed two people that afternoon - Kennedy and a policeman a few blocks away.

    A good portion of the museum deals with the various conspiracy theories that exist and the three investigations that followed to try and determine if Oswald did it by himself or if there was a second shooter behind the grassy knoll. Was he was working for the mafia, for the Russians or Cuba, for the CIA or any of a number of possible conspirators that have been suggested?

    Another section of the museum deals with Oswald. The corner window from where he took the shots is set up just as it was on that fateful day. How is a person who had defected to the U.S.S.R. (and then undefected back to the U.S.A) given so much free reign anyway?

    If you are a history buff, or over the age of 50, you owe it to yourself to visit this museum. Cost in 2006 was $10US, or $13 with the taped commentary. Unfortunately they have signs forbidding you to take pictures in the museum - I was considering taking a picture of the corner where Oswald shot from on-the-sly, but I didn't have the guts to do so.

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  • biljah's Profile Photo

    The Book Depository

    by biljah Updated Apr 9, 2006

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    JFK Museum

    This is the infamous Book Depository where they say kenedy was shot from. This is now a museum dedicated to John Fitzgerald Kennedy. You can walk around and even see the Grassy Nole. There is an X spray painted on the exact spot of the assasination. It's interesting to see where it all happened. Just about evey American has seen the video footage and now here is your chance to check it out for yourself. Who knows maybe you will dicover what actually happened that notorious day.

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  • Bullabong's Profile Photo

    SIxth floor museum at Dealy Plaza

    by Bullabong Updated Nov 24, 2005

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    If you come to Dallas you must not miss this museum. I found it very moving and thought provoking and I learnt a lot about the events on that tragic day in 1963. It is one of the best museums I have ever visited in terms of exhibitions, layout, information etc. It is especially moving because it is housed in The Book Depository building. The exhibition deals with the life, times, death and legacy of John F. Kennedy with a focus of the impact of his death on the nation and the world. You get to see the window and the view of Dealey Plaza the sniper used and they have recreated the scene as it looked on November 22nd, 1963. You can also see the corner staircase where the sniper allegedly exited and where the rifle was found. This area is reconstructed as it appeared from police department photographs. There are various sections including 'The Early 60's', 'The Investigations' and 'The Crisis Hours. It is a fascinating museum with lots of information, photographs, films and artefacts. The tour is ?10.00 per adult but you can pay an extra ?3.50 to hire an audio phone(available in seven languages) that gives you information and excerpts from historic radio broadcasts as you walk the tour.
    Downstairs there is a very good shop that sells videos, souvenirs, books etc. The website has a webcam link and there is a memory book to leave your thoughts.

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