Dealey Plaza Dedication, Dallas

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  • Dealey Plaza
    Dealey Plaza
    by Jim_Eliason
  • Dealey Plaza
    Dealey Plaza
    by Jim_Eliason
  • Dealey Plaza
    Dealey Plaza
    by Jim_Eliason
  • Bullabong's Profile Photo

    Dealey Plaza and the grassy knoll

    by Bullabong Updated Nov 11, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Even if you don't have time to visit the Sixth Floor Museum you have to make time to visit Dealey Plaza and the grassy knoll. It felt very strange to be standing in a place I had seen millions of times on the tv that had such an impact on our history. To view the sight and stand on the grassy knoll or at the picket fence with the view of the Book Depository building gives you a perspective of that tragic day. There is a small plaque beside the road marking the spot were J F Kennedy was shot. There is also a white cross on the road to show the area too. Although the trees are much taller now and some of the shrubbery is a little different, the grassy knoll appears just like it was in 1963.

    There is a link below to a live earthcam of the Grassy Knoll area and surrounding views.

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  • trina1's Profile Photo

    Sad View

    by trina1 Written Nov 5, 2005

    The grassy knoll where JFK was shot it is next to the book building where the shooter was waiting , they have a very moving museum in there. Look at the picture they have 2 white crosses where JFK was when the bullets hit , they could do without those.

    The grassy knoll

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  • GUYON's Profile Photo

    The 6th Floor museum

    by GUYON Written Apr 30, 2005

    I remember, I was a college pupil. The 23th November 1963, my father entered my room to awake me saying "they have shot Kennedy". It was an enormous event in Europe.
    The eve, somebody (Lee Oswald certainly) fired 3 shot s on the President JF Kennedy, from the corner window of the library located at the 6th floor of the building shown on the photograph.
    Now the 6th floor is a museum devoted to Kennedy and his murder.
    The corner from which Lee Oswald shot is preserved and protected by glass screens. It is impossible to enter. The day of the murder, there were book boxes on the floor and they have reconstructed the scene. Even the original window has been still kept.
    The other parts of the exibit are mainly pictures and videos.
    It is forbidden to take pictures even of the street through the window. The guards are there to enforce the prohibition.
    Price : 7$ with a 2$ coupon
    Open 9AM to 6PM.

    The entrance of the Sixth Floor Museum JFK was shot there
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  • Astrobuck's Profile Photo

    Dealey Plaza

    by Astrobuck Updated Feb 22, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    On November 22, 1963 President John F. Kennedy was assassinated while riding in a motorcade through Dealy Plaza. This area still has the original structures as they were on that day, except for the picket fence, which has long since been replaced. In addition, the 6th floor museum in the Dallas Book Depository overlooks the plaza.

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  • MatthewMetcalfe's Profile Photo

    Sixth Floor Museum - History of Tragedy

    by MatthewMetcalfe Written Feb 19, 2005

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    The Sixth Floor Museum is a museum that chronicles the Assassination of JFK. The Museum is located on the sixth floor of the Texas Book Depository. There is no place more fitting for location.

    The Museum starts with background on what life was like during the Kennedy Era. Popular Books and News Stories are presented. Then the fateful day is chronicled leading up to the assassination. The exhibits include a lot of what would have become history had Kennedy not been assassinated (tickets to a dinner that night along with instructions are displayed).

    Following the assassination, the museum covers the Conspiracy and Warren Commission.

    Along the museum tour you can see the window where Lee Harvey Oswald is supposed to have shot Kennedy. You can also see the FBI mock-up of Dealy Plaza.

    Following the museum you can stroll Dealy Plaza and see the Grassy Knoll. It is absolutely eerie. If feels as if you are walking through history.

    The Window - Second from top on the right. Eerie!
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  • tejanasueca's Profile Photo

    Dealey Plaza Dedication

    by tejanasueca Updated Jan 22, 2005

    In 1993, Dealey Plaza was dedicated as a National Historic Landmark. This plaque is situated on the sidewalk on Elm just where the Xs are. This is the spot where people will put their flowers etc in remembrance of JFK.

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  • Sweetberry1's Profile Photo

    JFK Memorial

    by Sweetberry1 Written Oct 12, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A fairly imposing structure, this monument was erected in 1970 to honour the memory of President J.F. Kennedy.
    It stands 30ft high and 50ft square. Its location is interestingly enough, right opposite the Conspiracy Museum.
    The monument is an open air structure and therefore accessible 24 hours a day. At night it is lit up.

    JFK Memorial
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  • Sweetberry1's Profile Photo

    A Sad in History

    by Sweetberry1 Updated Oct 2, 2004

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    Dallas will forever be remembered as the site of one of America's great tragedies. At 12:30pm on Nov. 22, 1963, President John F. Kennedy's motorcade was passing the Texas School Book Depository when shots rang out. The president had been shot and died a half-hour later.
    The book depository is now a museum honoring JFK's life and death.

    A place forever remembered.
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  • evalynn's Profile Photo

    40th anniversary art of JFK

    by evalynn Updated Sep 28, 2004

    My art that I created & placed in Dealey Plaza on 11/21-11/22/03. Picked up by the AP & CNN.
    UPDATE- my JFK art was a finalist in the Dallas Press Club's "KATIES". Didn't get the "KATIE". But I got what I really wanted....to be a finalist & the recogniziton for my art.

    40th anniversary JFK art by Lynn Jones

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  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Dealey Plaza

    by grandmaR Updated Sep 28, 2004

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    When I was first in Dallas at a convention in 1997, the city tour went by Dealey Plaza and the School Book Depository where I took the inset picture from the bus. It is inset into the photo I took from the car in 2004 at the same place. (Note - I'm higher up in the bus)

    The actual history of Dealey Plaza is far more interesting (to me) than all the endless speculation and alternative theories about JFK's assassination.

    In December 1910, the Dallas Morning News and publisher George Dealey began to advocate for a union station, to replace the six railroad stations and downtown maze of tracks in Dallas. In 1912, the 8 railroad companies agreed to form the Dallas Union Terminal Company. The nearby flood-prone Trinity River was dredged, its course altered by a mile, and 19 miles of approach track were laid.

    The city acquired the Plaza for construction of the Triple Underpass, which opened in 1936. The open park setting was named in honor of George Bannerman Dealey (1859-1946). A WPA project resulted in new landscaping, including the planting of Texas Oaks and construction of Art Deco concrete peristyles atop each slope that funnelled westward toward the Underpass.

    The southeast of the Plaza contains the "Old Red" Courthouse, built on a plot Byran donated. Completed in 1892, "Old Red," along with the Texas School Book Depository and 501 Elm, are all that remain of Old Dallas in Dealey Plaza.

    On the same block as "Old Red" is the John Fitzgerald Kennedy Memorial, built in 1970 by the city of Dallas; the white-stone cenotaph is meant to symbolize an open tomb.

    On November 22, 1993, Dealey Plaza — including all surrounding buildings, the Triple Underpass and parts of the North Yard — was dedicated as a National Historic Landmark District. At the ceremony, a National Park Service bronze plaque mounted on Texas pink granite was unveiled.

    Traffic continues to funnel beneath the Triple Underpass. By luck and chance, Dealey Plaza appears much as it did when the shooting took place.

    1997 picture inset into 2004 picture
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  • lashr1999's Profile Photo

    The Conspiracy Museum

    by lashr1999 Updated Sep 22, 2004

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    The Conspiracy Museum proposes several theories not explored by the sixth floor museus. I would go to the museum only if you have time. In my opinion the sixth floor museum which is a few blocks away is presented better with more material. There is a UfO exhibit at the bottom level of the conspiracy museum if you are interested. It's kind of an X-file Lone Gunman feel.

    The Conspiracy Museum
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  • lashr1999's Profile Photo

    JFK memorial

    by lashr1999 Written Sep 22, 2004

    This is a simple stark monument surrounded by four tall concrete slabs designed by a friend of Kennedy's family, Philip Johnson. After, visit the sixth floor museum for a better understanding of kennedys life and times.

    JFK memorial
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  • Mighty's Profile Photo

    Grassy Knoll (easy shot), Book...

    by Mighty Updated Jun 16, 2004

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Grassy Knoll (easy shot), Book Depository (impossible shot). They used to take us here every year when we were little kids on field trips. I know it was to teach us history but it just gave me nightmares. I haven't been there since I was old enough to understand what it means, so my tip on the whole JFK thing is this: Dallas is hot in the summer and very spaced out, if your kids are younger than about 8, do yourself a favor and do something else. If you have no kids and the day is nice, wander around downtown and soak up some of the local flavor. Keeping in mind that anything labeled "Cajun" "Gator" or "Hollywood" is just going to be a tourist trap and not a place that the locals would bother with.

    Amendment: I had the occasion to go to the new museum there the other day and it's not bad, a little pricy and boring, but history buffs will get a big kick out of it though. Keep in mind that there seems to be a small cottage industry of disreputable people hanging around trying to sell fliers and "information" down there who all seem to be the great folks to avoid.

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  • BLewJay's Profile Photo

    Dealey Plaza

    by BLewJay Updated May 5, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is the place that all the world had heard about...it's the place where JFK was shot and killed in November 1963. You've seen it on the televison, but once you visit the actual location, it changes you forever.

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  • bryINpoland's Profile Photo

    jfk, what else can i say

    by bryINpoland Written Jan 30, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    i am sure hundreds of people have already wrote about the sixth floor museum. i just thought i would leave a little note about it and a little tip.

    first of all let me say that the museum was great, well put together and really took u back in time. luckly i wasnt born yet when this happen and so i cant answer the question "where was i when jfk was shot". i have already seen enough horrible things on the news in my life. we all have.

    i took a stroll down to the grass knoll after just to walk around, get some pics and get a feel for the place. while at the knoll i ran across a man who had his own theories about what happen that faithful day, and though i really dont know what to believe when it comes to what "really" happen, i found it really interesting and entertaining at the same time. u can find some interesting people at the knoll who are there everyday trying to make u aware of the conspiracy's at work. if u visit the museum, i recommend taking a walk down to the grass knoll. it is all part of the experience.

    * feel free to rate this tip or any other of my tips, i am always looking to make improvements

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