Fun things to do in Dallas

  • The MBA - Museum of Biblical Art
    The MBA - Museum of Biblical Art
    by scottpeck
  • Dallas Museum of Art
    Dallas Museum of Art
    by Jim_Eliason
  • The Heard Museum
    The Heard Museum
    by Jim_Eliason

Most Viewed Things to Do in Dallas

  • blueskyjohn's Profile Photo

    Take notice of the light show

    by blueskyjohn Updated Dec 11, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I was surprised at the modern architecture and how it is lit up at night. I took a few hours one night to walk around the city center and check out some of the buildings. Being from the NYC area, it is refreshing to see how Dallas looks at night.

    Take notice and check it out.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    The Heard Museum

    by Jim_Eliason Written Feb 3, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This Natural History Museum and nature center is in the northeast suburb of McKinney. It has a nice collection of live animals, geology, paleontology and archaeology exhibits. To boot it has a fine system of nature trails.

    The Heard Museum The Heard Museum The Heard Museum The Heard Museum The Heard Museum
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Family Travel
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • Donna Gromly Book Signing

    by jtiller Written Feb 26, 2013

    In her debut novel, Gormly weaves together the story of life in a small town in Missouri during the 1950”s, when the railroad tracks run thru Tysen holding the town together, and the Annual Pie Supper bring the “wonderfully idiosyncratic people” of Tysen together.

    Mrs. Gormly will discuss her book beginning at 2:00 PM and be available to sign copies at the Preston Royal Barnes and Nobles Book Store located at 5959 Royal Lane on March 2, 2013. For more information call 214-521-6677.

    Was this review helpful?

  • msbrandysue's Profile Photo

    WaterTower Theatre

    by msbrandysue Written Feb 18, 2012

    WaterTower Theatre is a community playhouse that does high-class musicals, plays, and even brings in big-name Broadway stars for private concerts. It is a not-for-profit playhouse that averages about 5 shows a year in the Addison Theatre Centre, located right by the Addison! water tower. The shows are wonderful, top of the line. This isn't just a bunch of community members singing and dancing to recordings. These are wonderful performers from all over the country!

    They even have summer productions in the park for free for the community members. (See other tip.)

    The last time I attended an event it was for a Christmas show with Betty Buckley, Tony-award winner. The theatre is so intimate and small that it was really a treasure. My aunt worked for her dressing room while doing Sunset Boulevard so I was so excited that our seats were so close. Definitely worth the $50/ticket price!

    Tickets can range from $10-100 depending on the performance or special event. They have a wide array of events depending on the time of year you'll be visiting.

    The Water Tower Addison Theatre Centre The intimate venue
    Related to:
    • Theater Travel
    • Women's Travel
    • Seniors

    Was this review helpful?

  • Dallas Summer Musicals

    by scottpeck Written Nov 6, 2011

    My favorite place to see a musical in the Southwest is in Dallas at the Dallas Summer Musicals, housed at the Music Hall in Fair Park. Don't let the name fool you, Dallas Summer Musicals is a year round venue presenting the best in musical theater in every season. Now I love to go to Broadway and see musical theater in New York. However, the experience at Dallas Summer Musicals has its own charm and attraction unlike anywhere else in the world. Imagine a romantic Spanish Baroque style building on the campus of Fair Park, home of the World's Fair of 1936 with art deco buildings and monuments. The interior feel of the Music Hall is so comfortable with a spacious and relaxing atmosphere. Picture luxurious 1970s style with original art sculptures, thick carpeting and lush seating. This is in refreshing contrast to the newer ATT Performing Arts Center in Dallas that feels awkward, cramped and uneasy. The seats in the Music Hall are large and make you feel like you are in an armchair rather than the new theaters that cram seats so close together to squeeze every dollar. You will feel pampered and cared for by the staff. The quality of the performances make you think you are in a Broadway theater, yet you are in the heart of Texas. I've been attending musicals and performances here for many years and I highly recommend it to you.

    SPECIAL TIP: Go to the Dallas Summer Musicals during the time of the Texas State Fair. Your ticket to the musical entitles you to free admission to the Texas State Fair for the day of the performance! This is a great way to save money and have an unforgettable experience by spending the day at the Fair seeing the pig races, food contests, the latest automobiles, dog tricks, eating fried corny dogs, and topping it all off with a world class musical.

    I recommend eating at the Music Hall for any performance. In my opinion, the buffet option is the best choice. The offerings at the salad bar alone are worth the price of the buffet. You'll find various salads, fine cheeses, sausages and aged meats, and cold grilled vegetables. The main buffet table has a sampling of hearty main dishes and vegetables. There is always an elaborate dessert buffet table with many fine cakes and desserts to sample. What I think is ingenious, is that they will create special selections based upon the theme of the musical that is showing for that night. For West Side Story there were contrasting American/New York dishes for the Jets and Puerto Rican dishes for the Sharks with names and ingredients to compliment these themes. Leonard Bernstein would be beaming. For the musical Shrek there were Swamp Salads with other foods related to characters like Donkey, Princess Fiona and Lord Farquaad. Try the themed cocktails like Shrek Ogre Juice and the Mary Poppins Martini.

    The other option I like when short on time or funds is to go upstairs for a salad. They will create a fresh salad in a large stainless steel bowl. You choose the ingredients and they will toss it right in front of your eyes.

    Reservation Line: 214.413.3940

    For complete information about the new "Dining at the Music Hall" restaurant,
    such as management, catering details, and other details, please visit: www.MusicHallDining.com

    Dining at the Music Hall serves a sumptuous buffet before each performance. Reservations are recommended, but not required; call 214-413-3940.

    The price for Dining in the Music Hall is not included in your event ticket price. Dining at the Music Hall opens 2 hours before show time, 12 noon for matinee performances and 6pm for evening performances at the Music Hall. The restaurant closes at show time. The buffet ranges from $21.95 - $25.95 (prices subject to change) depending on day and time. The Broadway Cafe is a lighter fare before each performance and during intermission. Sandwiches, salads, desserts, and snacks are sold from price points of $3 to $10.

    The Music Hall at Fair Park Music Hall Tower Interior Rendering of the Music Hall at Fair Park
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Music
    • Theater Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • DennyP's Profile Photo

    VISIT THE DALLAS COWBOYS NEW STADIUM

    by DennyP Written Oct 11, 2011

    When recently visiting friends in one of my favourite places ,Dallas...I was asked if I'd like to visit the new and huge Cowboys Football Stadium...and of course I agreed...
    Located in the nearby town of Arlington this first sight of this new Stadium is that it is big ,and big is an understatement to say the least...This is huge..and is the largest retractable dome covered Stadium in the world. Opened in May 2009 this stadium replaced the old "Texas stadium which was the then Dallas Cowboys "home stadium" and wasclosed in 2008. Built at a cost of 1.15 billion dollars the new Stadium is the Home to the Dallas Cowboys and is used primarily for The NFL Cowboys fixtures. The capacity of the stadium is 80,000 seated or 110,00 including standing patrons.. ..The stadium is also used for College and High School football fixtures also. The biggest capacity crowd of 108.213 attend a fixture here in February 14th 2010 that saw the NBA (National Basketball Asociation) All Star Game played.
    The visit inside is again spectacular ,and one that is quite amazing and as it was a quiet weekday, apart from visitors activities, noticeably there appeared to be an army of staff on hand..A walk out onto the playing field was another experience bringing to mind the size of this area and what the players must feel .." above the field ,the playback screen" is enourmous and covers a length from the 20 yard line to the 20 yard line and can be seen from anywhere that you would be seated..
    There also is a visit to the players locker rooms with lockers displaying the names of the various players and another just down the hall is the famous "Dallas Cheerleaders " locker room again with large photos of the girls and named lockers..

    THE DALLAS COWBOYS NEW STADIUM  ARLINGTON  TEXAS THE HUGE PLAYING FIELD AND SOME OF THE SEATING THE MASSIVE HIGH DEFINITION PLAYBACK SCREEN IN THE END ZONE COWBOYS ..END ZONE ANOTHER VIEW
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    1847 Miller Log House

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This square notched log structure, which is now in Old City Park in Dallas was built in South Oak Clibb by William Brown miller and his slaves. It is typical of the houses built for temporary shelter on the frontier in Texas. It is constructed of oak and cedar, and has local limestone for the chimney. The buildings served as a home for the Millers for about 15 years nad then had a second life as one of the earliest schools in Dallas County. It is furnished primarily with Texas-made items.as it would have appeared when the early pioneers set up housekeeping.

    Additional photos are in the Intro.

    Interior of cabin 1847 Miller Log Cabin Bedroom
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Miller Playhouse 1908

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The playhouse was built from logs cut on William Brown Miller's land on the banks of the Trinity River. He built this crude log structure in 1908 for his granddaughter Evelyn. The ceiling was raised in 1920 because Evelyn had grown too tall for the original height of the building.

    The pictures had to be taken through glass because it would be too easy for people to reach in and touch or worse take the objects inside. Reflections made picture taking difficult.

    Interior of Miller Playhouse 1908 Bob, daughter and granddaughter at playhouse
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Build the news upon the rock of truth

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Dallas Morning News developed from the Galveston News which was founded in 1842 by Samuel Bangs. Alfred H. Belo acquired control of the Galveston paper and wanted to expand to Dallas. When efforts to purchase the old Dallas Herald failed, Belo sent George Bannerman Dealey to launch a new paper, the Dallas Morning News which began publishing October 1, 1885.

    Linked across 315 miles by telegraph, and sharing a network of correspondents across the state, the Dallas Morning News and the Galveston News were the first two newspapers in the country to publish simultaneous editions.

    The News is also currently the only major daily in Dallas. Its closest and longest-lived rival, The Dallas Times Herald, went out of business in the early 1990s

    This building faces Ferris Plaza on its south side. Above the front doors, engraved in large letters, is an admonition from longtime News Vice-President and General Manager George B. Dealey, which reads:

    Build the news upon the rock of truth and righteousness. Conduct it always upon the lines of fairness and integrity. Acknowledge the right of the people to get from the newspaper both sides of every important question.

    Dallas Morning News building
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Business Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • VeronicaG's Profile Photo

    The Historic District of Swiss Avenue

    by VeronicaG Updated Jun 6, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Swiss Avenue district was always a location where the refined of Dallas resided. Stretching to include over 200 preserved and restored homes, this area of the city boasts wide, tree-lined streets and a small neighborhood park.

    A home tour was given in May, 2010 which we unfortunately missed, but I am sure there were no regrets for those who purchased tickets! Maybe we'll join the throng next year.

    You'll find many architectural styles here: Mediterranean, Spanish, Georgian, Neoclassical, Tudor, Italian Renaissance, Craftsman, Colonial Revival and Prairie (pics 2-3). This street is on the National Register of Historic Places and considered to be "one of the finest early 20th century neighborhoods in the Southwest".

    R.S. and Collett Munger originally developed the Swiss Avenue and Munger Districts in 1905, comprising a 300 acre area. Mr. Munger was a cotton gin manufacturer. They were very particular in the developing this area, so paved streets, sidewalks, and amenties such as gas mains, sewers, electric street lights and landscaping were part of the overall appeal to living here. Swiss Avenue is still a attractive place to call home!

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • VeronicaG's Profile Photo

    The Munger Historic District

    by VeronicaG Updated Jun 6, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Munger historic district is bounded by these streets: Junius, Munger Blvd., Fitzhugh and Reiger. It has an abundance of Prairie-style homes and is the largest collection of this type in the United States. This neighborhood is listed by the National Register of Historic Places and is a great example of a "City man's" home.

    Of course, this area was not always looking so good. It had faced decline like many city neighborhoods, but once renovation began it took off to beat the band (pics 2-3)! We particularly liked the homes on Victor, which was off Munger street.

    As we were strolling the sidewalks ogling the homes and taking pictures, while attempting to hit every slice of shade available on this 90 degree-plus day, my husband began a conversation with a very nice lady who was washing her car. Before long she invited us in to see her home. We briefly shared horror stories about home renovations. What a gift to have been given a peek at one of these very restorations--Texans are so friendly!

    A neighborhood house tour was last given two years ago (2008) but there may be one coming up in 2010 or 11. One can always hope!

    In 1905, Cotton gin manufacturer Robert Munger developed the areas of Munger and Swiss Avenue (see separate tip) as part of a 300 acre planned community. These neighborhoods were carefully designed and were meant to 'attact the right social element'. Paved streets, sidewalks, electric street lights, gas mains, sewers and lovely tree-lined avenues made it a pleasant place to live...and it still is!

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • VeronicaG's Profile Photo

    The Bishop Arts District

    by VeronicaG Updated Mar 5, 2010

    Discovering a new place of interest is always gratifying, so a visit to the Bishop Arts District in the North Oak Cliff quarter of Dallas gave us just such an afternoon!

    Only minutes away from downtown Dallas, you'll find an art gallery or two, boutiques, a vintage resale shop, chocolatiers, great restaurants* and restored century old buildings. We also stumbled upon a book binder, which we're planning to make use of soon!

    Some of the shops we explored were:

    Bishop Street Market 419 N. Bishop Ave. at 7th St. (pic #2)
    Dude, Sweet Chocolate 408 W. 8th St. (pic #3)
    Zola's Everyday Vintage 414 N. Bishop Ave.
    The Book Doctor 310 W. 7th St.
    Artisan's Collective 410 N. Bishop Ave.
    The Soda Gallery 408 N. Bishop Ave. (pic #4)

    A pleasant walk down Bishop Avenue took us by most of these unique shops. Three of our favorites were Bishop Street Market (art, aromatics, misc. gifts), Dude, Sweet Chocolate (samples and tasty confections) and The Soda Gallery, which offered quite a selection of soft drinks for sale and a novel decor!

    Nearby, the restored and retro style Belmont Hotel (901 Ft. Worth Ave.) provided a cliffside view of the Dallas skyline (pic #5). It must be a marvelous sight in the evening!

    See 'restaurant tips' for our tasty lunch at Tillman's Roadhouse

    Bishop Arts District Bishop Street Market Making candy at Dude, Sweet Chocolate The Soda Gallery View from the Belmont Hotel
    Related to:
    • Singles
    • Seniors
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mccalpin's Profile Photo

    Things to do along the Dart Red Line (light rail)

    by mccalpin Written Dec 26, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We have a light rail system now, run by DART (www.dart.org). The most interesting line is the Red Line, which runs from Plano on the North down through downtown Dallas to Oak Cliff.

    Points of interest within close proximity of a Red Line stop:

    1. The Eisemann Center (Galatyn Park stop) - a regional performing arts center - http://www.eisemanncenter.com/tickets/

    2. Northpark Shopping Center (Park Lane stop) - the oldest (I think) covered mall in the US and still home to stores like Neiman Marcus - see http://www.northparkcenter.com/
    Still plenty upscale...note that the shopping center is across the highway and a little distance from the Dart station, so there's a shuttle - see http://www.northparkcenter.com/transportation.html

    3. Mockingbird Station (complex next to the Mockingbird stop) with stores, restaurants, the Angelika (independent movie theater), and bars (well, Trinity Hall - a fine Irish place like that isn't just a "bar" ;-) ) - see http://www.mockingbirdstation.com/

    4. The Dallas Arts District (Pearl and St. Paul stops) - home of
    - Dallas Museum of Art
    - Nasher Sculpture Center
    - Trammell Crow Center and Crow Collection of Asian Art
    - Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center
    - AT&T Performing Arts Center Margot and Bill Winspear Opera House
    - AT&T Performing Arts Center Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre
    - Dallas Black Dance Theatre
    - AT&T Performing Arts Center Elaine D. and Charles A. Sammons Park
    See http://www.thedallasartsdistrict.org/home.html for more info as well as references to other buildings in the district, such as the Cathedral Shrine of the Virgin of Guadalupe (2nd busiest Catholic cathedral in the US), and St. Paul United Methodist Church, built by freed slaves in 1873.

    5. Dallas World Aquarium and Zoological Garden (between Akard and West End stops) - http://www.dwazoo.com/d/

    6. The West End (West End stop) - site of many restaurants and the "Bodies" exhibition (yes, real live human bodies, preserved...until April) - see http://www.dallaswestend.org/

    7. Union Station (Union Station stop) - the original train station for Dallas, which connects to the TRE (more below).

    8. The Dallas Zoo (Dallas Zoo stop) - see http://www.dallaszoo.com/

    As for Union Station, the TRE also stops here, and runs over to Ft. Worth, passing near (not at) DFW Airport on the way. See http://www.trinityrailwayexpress.org/
    NOTE: no TRE service on Sundays, but on other days, you can take a bus from the airport to the TRE station and ride the TRE to Union Station in Dallas (to meet the Dart light rail) or to downtown Ft. Worth.

    In terms of hotels, there are a few hotels near the West End stop (the Dallas Convention Center is just to the south, like a Holiday Inn (I haven't been in it). The Hyatt Regency (http://www.dallasregency.hyatt.com/hyatt/hotels/index.jsp) is connected to Union Station via a tunnel, and is a short walk to the West End (note, if you do this on the surface, you will pass by Dealey Plaza where President Kennedy was assassinated and where there is a decent museum called the "Sixth Floor Museum").

    There are other hotels here and there, of course, but as a Richardson resident, I don't pay a lot of attention to them. If money is no object, you can stay at the Crescent (a few blocks north of the Pearl stop, I think) which is near McKinney Avenue, so many places to eat and drink. There are nice hotels near the Pearl stop - at Plaza of the Americas? (I've been there; I just don't know what it's called ;-) ). In any case, this would be next to the Arts District.

    Note that all the hotels I have mentioned are in or near downtown, and sometimes the street life can be annoying (panhandling, which is technically illegal, still happens a lot), and since most people here have cars, we don't have near as much pedestrian traffic as other major cities - i.e., you don't always have the protection of crowds.

    At the Galatyn stop is the Renaissance Hotel (http://www.richardsonrenaissance.com/home.aspx), which is actually between the Dart station and the Eisemann (they are all right together). Richardson is a very safe suburb of Dallas (I live here), although it is more geared to residential and white collar business uses (the hotel and the Eisemann are located on the edge of the "Telecom Corridor", a large area of companies dedicated originally to the wireless industry). The area is also planned as mixed use, although I am not sure how many restaurants are there yet (there is a nice tapas place that I know of). The bigger mixed use place is about a half a mile to the south called "Eastside" with a number of restaurants among buildings with businesses downstairs and residential upstairs.

    Anyway, it would be possible to stay along with rail corridor and do stuff every day for a few days, and even get to/from DFW (but not on Sunday :- ( )...or you could rent a car ;-)

    Bill

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Business Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • VeronicaG's Profile Photo

    Horse and Carriage Rides in Historic West End

    by VeronicaG Updated Feb 26, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It was a balmy summer evening and we were breathing in the atmosphere of the West End when a horse drawn carriage clopped by.

    The steady rhythm of the hoofs echoed between the buildings and reverberated up the side streets of the city. There's just something about an evening carriage ride that seems so romantic!

    If you are drawn to this type of conveyance, too, I'm happy to report that Dallas Surrey Company offers carriage rides nightly on Market Street in historic West End--weather permitting, of course.

    You'll slowly pass Dealey Park and the former Texas Book Depository, then along some secondary streets. We were even given time to run into an ice cream store.

    It was a perfect way to spend some time getting acquainted with the city. For more information phone: PARTY ANIMALS (214-441-9996)

    West End Carriage Rides
    Related to:
    • Women's Travel
    • Seniors
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • VeronicaG's Profile Photo

    Take a Drive Through Highland Park

    by VeronicaG Updated Nov 8, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Like many cities, Dallas has its swanky neighborhoods and Highland Park is one of them. Friends recently drove us through this tree-lined community of multi-million dollar homes.

    As far back as 1889, this land was meant to be developed for exclusive housing. This area was further elevated when two individuals were hired for their expertise: Wilbur David Cook, who designed Fair Park and quite a bit of downtown Dallas and George E. Kessler, who envisioned Beverly Hills, California.

    There is a small shopping mall located within this area in which you can find shops such as Hermes and Harry Winston and surprisingly, a Tom Thumb grocery store (picture 3).

    One of its pretty little greenspaces is known as Echo Park (picture 2). There are many parks throughout this area, threaded by Turtle Creek. It is also home to Southern Methodist University.

    Harry Winston
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Seniors
    • Singles

    Was this review helpful?

Dallas Hotels

See all 189 Hotels in Dallas

Latest Dallas Hotel Reviews

West End Hotel Dallas
Excellent (4.5 out of 5.0) 3 Reviews
Hotel Indigo Dallas Downtown
Great (4.0 out of 5.0) 2 Reviews
Sheraton Dallas Hotel
Very Good (3.5 out of 5.0) 7 Reviews
Rosewood Crescent Court
Great (4.0 out of 5.0) 1 Review
The Westin Galleria Dallas
Very Good (3.5 out of 5.0) 2 Reviews
Hotel St. Germain
1 Review
Le Meridien Dallas North
Best (5.0 out of 5.0) 2 Reviews
Executive Inn Dallas
Best (5.0 out of 5.0) 1 Review
Hyatt Regency Dallas
Excellent (4.5 out of 5.0) 6 Reviews
The Westin City Center
Excellent (4.5 out of 5.0) 3 Reviews

Instant Answers: Dallas

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

23 travelers online now

Comments

Dallas Things to Do

Travel tips and advice posted by real travelers and Dallas locals.
Map of Dallas