Fort Worth Off The Beaten Path

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by Yaqui
  • historic cabin - downtown grapevine
    historic cabin - downtown grapevine
    by jkruit
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by Yaqui

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Fort Worth

  • Grapevine, Texas

    by jkruit Updated May 6, 2012
    historic cabin - downtown grapevine

    31 minutes northeast....Step back in time to this small town with quaint and unique shops, the tarantula train that runs to the stockyards, wine tasting, a great bakery and more. Grapevine is the oldest settlement in Tarrant County...It's a very nice place to spend the day, more for couples and girls trips rather than children. Except the train is nice for the kids. And periodically, they have some nice events/festivals for the kids. Also Gaylord Resort, Wolf Lodge and Bass Pro shop are located in this city. Visit Bass Pro (outside of downtown area) just for the beautiful wildlife displays. If you've never been to Bass Pro or Cabellas, its impressive the first time.

    Once you park your car, you can walk the whole downtown area.

    Visitor center

    Open Daily
    COTTON BELT DEPOT
    705 South Main Street
    Grapevine, TX 76051
    817-410-8136

    Monday - Saturday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
    Sunday Noon - 5 p.m.

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    Tarrant County Courthouse Historical Marker

    by Yaqui Updated Feb 5, 2012

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    Year Marker Erected: 1969

    Marker Text: Designed by firm of Gunn & Curtis and built by the Probst Construction Company of Chicago, 1893-1895. This red Texas granite building, in Renaissance Revival style, closely resembles the Texas State Capital with the exception of the clock tower. The cost was $408,840 and citizens considered it such a public extravagance that a new County Commissioners' Court was elected in 1894.

    Main & Weatherford Streets

    Located near the front entrance of the Tarrant County Courthouse.

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    Fort Worth Livestock Exchange Tarrant Co. Marker

    by Yaqui Written Nov 6, 2011

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    The plaque reads:

    Headquarters, one of the greatest cattle markets in the world. In late 1860s Fort Worth was stop on cattle trails. Market for the West Texas organized 1870s. First trader, T.B. Saunders, Sr., soon was joined by others. First small packing houses were followed (early 1900s) by multi-million dollar plants. By 1910 trading almost doubled. This structure was erected in 1902-03 to house the Stockyards Company, Livestock Commission, and buyers officers, surrounded by lawns (now parking lots). In 1944, was purchased by United Stockyards Corporation. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark.

    Located at 532 E. Exchange Street, Fort Worth TX 76164,

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    The Fort Worth Stock Yards Company Tarrant Co. MRK

    by Yaqui Written Nov 6, 2011

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    The plaque reads:

    The Fort Worth Stock Yards Company was created in 1893, when Boston capitalist Greenlief W. Simpson led a group of investors in purchasing the Fort Worth Union Stock Yards. Under Simpson's leadership, the Company earned the support of the Texas Cattle Raisers Association and lured the prominent meatpacking companies of Armour and Swift to open plants here. Publicity through the Company's market newspaper and annual Fat Stock Show, both begun in 1896, resulted in a significant increase in the number of animals brought to market. The Stock Yards Co. built the area's livestock-related facilities and had controlling interest in many North Fort Worth businesses and properties.
    The first five decades of the 20th Century were the most successful for the Fort Worth Stock Yards Co. During World War I, foreign governments purchased draft animals, making Fort Worth the largest horse and mule market in the world. In 1917, overall livestock market receipts reached 3,500,000 and in 1944, sales exceeded 5,000,000 head of livestock. However, by the 1950s, local auctions were drawing sellers away from this central market. Today the Fort Worth Stock Yards Co. continues as a significant part of the city's unique heritage. Texas Sesquicentennial 1836-1986.

    Located at the intersection of E. Exchange Street, on the left when traveling east on E. Exchange Street.

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    Texas Trail of Fame

    by Yaqui Written Nov 6, 2011

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    One of my favorite actors!
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    There are 116 bronze markers of inductees such as: John Wayne, Will Rogers, Zane Grey, Bose Ikard, Tad Lucas, Roy Rogers, Dale Evans, Charles Goodnight, Oliver Loving, C.C. Slaughter, Juan Sequin, Bob Wills, Bill Pickett, Frederic Remington, and Quanah Parker. These are in honor of those who made significant contribution to our histories western heritage. They are located along the sidewalks of the Stockyard.b

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    Comanche Chief Quanah Parker 1852 -1911

    by Yaqui Updated Nov 6, 2011

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    The plaque reads:

    Comanche chief Quanah Parker was a son of two cultures. He was born about 1845 along Elk Creek, Indian Territory (Oklahoma). His Anglo mother was Cynthia Ann Parker, taken captive in a May 1836 raid and adopted by Qua-Ha-Di (Antelope) Comanches, and his father was Comanche chief Peta Nocona. Texas Rangers reclaimed Cynthia Ann in an 1860 fight at the Pease River. Nocona died soon after, and Cynthia Ann lived with relatives near Birdville in Tarrant County before dying with no further contact with her Comanche family.

    Becoming chief upon his father's death, Quanah refused to sign the 1867 Medicine Lodge Treaty that sent many Plains Indians to reservations. Instead, he led raids in Texas and Mexico for another seven years, likely including the last foray into Tarrant County in June 1871. That winter, Quanah's band eluded Col. Ranald Mackenzie's Fourth U.S. Cavalry across the Texas panhandle. Comanche losses during the 1874 Panhandle Battle of Adobe Walls, in which Quanah was wounded, followed by a harsh winter, finally brought him and fewer than 100 remaining Qua-Ha-Di to the reservation at Fort Sill, Indian Territory in May 1875.

    Quanah served as liaison between his people and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. He proved to be a pragmatic leader, encouraging the Comanches to take up ranching and farming, and to educate their children in government schools. Quanah prospered through his investments and built his spacious "Star House" near Cache, OK. He traveled widely, giving speeches and interviews and participating in wild west shows, the Texas State Fair, Texas Cattle Raisers Association gathering and the Fort Worth Fat Stock Show. Quanah visited Fort Worth and the Stockyards on many occasions. He died in 1911 and is buried at Fort Sill with his Mom and sister.

    132 E. Exchange Ave in front of AmeriSuites Hotel

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    Cattle Drives~Heritage Trails Marker

    by Yaqui Written Nov 6, 2011

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    The plaque reads:

    After the Civil War, people in Texas realized that an estimated 3.5 million free-roaming cattle scattered throughout the state were a valuable asset. Between 1866 and 1887, over five million head of cattle were rounded up to make the five-month, 800-mile trip through Texas to railheads in Kansas. Fort Worth, the last “civilized” stop before Indian Territory, became an important supply center. Driven by 10 or 12 cowboys, herds forded the Trinity and bedded down north of the river for a few days. In 1871, a reported 360,000 “beeves” were driven through Fort Worth along the Chisholm Trail (today’s Commerce, Calhoun, Jones and Grove streets). The invention of barbed wire and the advancing railroad brought an end to the cattle drives, but with the stockyards and the growing number of area ranches in need of supplies, Fort Worth remained a “cowtown.”
    sponsored by: the elton and christine hyder foundation.

    Located at West side of Commerce & 2nd Streets.

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    General William Jenkins Worth~Tarrant Co. Marker

    by Yaqui Updated Nov 6, 2011

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    The plaque reads:

    William Jenkins Worth, a native of Hudson, New York, was severely wounded at Lundy's Lane during the War of 1812. In 1820 he became instructor of infantry tactic and soldierly discipline at the United States Military Academy at West Point. He was sppointed The First Commandant of Cadets in 1825. When Worth was reassigned in 1828, Robert E.Lee was serving as Cadet Adjutant. Worth was involved in defenses along the Canadian border in the 1830's and in 1841-1842 led an expedition against the Florida Seminole Indians. He was awarded a commendation from the Florida Territorial Legislature and was promoted to Brigadier General. During the Mexican War Worth fought at The Battle of Monterrey. He recieved a Sword of Honor from the U.S. Congress and a promotion to Major General. While serving as Commander of the Texas and New Mexico Military Districts, Worth died of cholera in San Antonio in 1849. Fort Worth, a frontier post establlished asfter his death, was named in his honor. Worth was buried in New York City, his grave, at Broadway and Fifth Avenue, is marked by a Fifty Foot Monument and is surrounded by a fence of cast iron swords. Copies of his New York STate Sword of Honor.

    Located across from Hotel Texas/Radisson in the park, 800 Main St., Fort Worth.

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    JFK~Hotel Texas~Heritage Trails Markers

    by Yaqui Written Nov 6, 2011

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    The plaque reads:

    On the evening of November 21, 1963, President and Mrs. John F. Kennedy arrived in Fort Worth to spend the night at the Hotel Texas. Early the next morning, President Kennedy made an unscheduled outdoor appearance and surprised a crowd that had gathered here hoping to see him. At breakfast in the hotel, he spoke to 3,000 people emphasizing Fort Worth’s role in defense and aircraft production. He accepted with good humor the city’s traditional welcome gift of a locally made Shady Oaks Western Hat. The president’s trip around Texas, though billed as non-political, was surely brought about by infighting among Texas democrats.
    Following breakfast on November 22, 1963 the president and his entourage left the Hotel Texas in a motorcade to Carswell Air Force Base for a short flight to Dallas. On the drive to a luncheon speech in Dallas, President Kennedy was assassinated, bringing shock and grief to Texas, the nation and the world. sponsored by: fort worth star-telegram

    Located at Kennedy Plaza – 8th Street between Main & Commerce Streets.

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    Site of Saint Stanislaus Kostka Catholic Church

    by Yaqui Written Nov 6, 2011

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    The plaque reads:

    Catholics in Fort Worth began meeting together for regular worship services by 1875. They met in private homes, and were served by traveling priests. In 1876 Bishop Claude Dubuis of the Diocese of Galveston assigned a young Irish priest, Farther Thomas Loughrey, to establish a parish in Fort Worth. In July 1876 the Diocese purchased two lots at this site for a church to be named for Polish Jesuit Saint Stanislaus Kostka. Within three months, on October 29, 1876, Father Laughry said the first High Mass in the frame structure. He continued to serve the church until 1884, when Father Jean Marie Guyot was assigned as Pastor. The church opened a Catholic School in the parish. Classes initially were taught by Father Loughrey and the Sisters of Mercy. After 1885 the school was operated by the Sisters of St. Mary. By 1885 plans were underway for a new church structure. Completed in 1892, it was named for Saint Patrick. The original Saint Stanislaus building became part of the school. After serving the parish for over three decades, it was removed between 1908 and 1909 to make way for a new parish rectory.

    Located at Located at 1206 Throckmorton, Fort Worth

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    John Peter Smith Tarrant. Co. Historical Marker

    by Yaqui Written Nov 6, 2011

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    The plaque reads:

    A native of kentucky, john peter smith migrated to Fort Worth in 1853. He worked as a teacher, clerk, and surveyor before his appointment as deputy surveyor of the Denton Land Department in 1855, for which he received payment in property. Also a student of law, he was later admitted to the bar although opposed to the secession of texas during the civil war, Smith raised a company of Tarrant County Men for the Confederacy and joined Sibley's Brigade in 1861. While in the war he served in the unsuccessful invasion of New Mexico, the recapture
    of Galveston in 1863, and was severely wounded at Donaldsville, Louisiana, later that year. After the war Smith returned to Fort Worth, where he became involved in the development of the city. He helped organize a bank, gas light company, and street railway. He also donated land for parks, cemeteries, and a hospital, later named John Peter Smith Hospital. In 1882 he became mayor and directed the establishment of many public services, including the school system and the water department. In 1901 Smith died in St. Louis, Missouri, while on a
    promotional trip for fort worth. He is buried in Oakwood Cemetery, a site he donated to the city. (1980)

    Located in small park, 1100 Throckmorton, Fort Worth

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    Cynthia Ann Parker & Native Americans of North TX

    by Yaqui Updated Nov 6, 2011

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    The plaque reads:
    Native Americans hunted bison on the plains of North Texas in the 1800s. They traded freely with settlers, but conflicts did occur. Some tribal villages were attacked and some settlers’ homesteads were raided and captives taken.
    In January 1861, a photo of captive Cynthia Ann Parker and her daughter Topsannah was taken in Fort Worth. In 1836 Cynthia Ann, age 9, and others had been taken from their family compound at Fort Parker by Comanche. She then lived her life as a Comanche. Comanche leader Peta Nocona and Cynthia Ann had three children. In 1860 she and her daughter were captured by Texas Rangers and returned to the Parker family who lived in Tarrant County. Topsannah died in 1863. Parker’s life until she died in 1870 was spent in sadness, lonely for her life as a Comanche. Her son, Quannah, became a great leader of the Comanche as a warrior and a statesman and frequently visited Fort Worth.
    sponsored by: city of fort worth

    Located at West side of Main between 7th & 8th Streets

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    Flying Machines~Heritage Trails Marker

    by Yaqui Written Nov 6, 2011

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    The plaque reads:

    Fort Worth residents got their first sight of flying machines in 1911 when the International Aviators National Tour was lured to town by Amon G. Carter, Sr. That same year the first “air mail” letter was delivered.
    During World War I, the U.S., Canada, and Britain jointly established three airfields where 2,000 pilots trained. The city’s first airport, Meacham Field, opened in 1925. Texas Air Transport began regular mail and passenger service in 1928; it became American Airlines in 1934.
    Thousands of B-24 “Liberator” bombers were built in Fort Worth during World War II. Pilots trained at adjacent Tarrant Air Field, renamed Carswell Air Force Base in 1948. The site became the Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base in 1994. Known as an aviation manufacturing center for bombers, fighter planes, helicopters, and commercial aircraft, Fort Worth also became a major transportation center in 1974 with the opening of DFW International Airport.
    sponsored by: lockheed martin.

    Located at East side of Main between 6th & 7th Streets.

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    The Wild Bunch ~ Heritage Trails Marker

    by Yaqui Written Nov 6, 2011

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    The plaque reads:

    When professional photographer John Swartz snapped the famous photograph of five young men in 1901, he had no idea it would end up on a “wanted” poster. Swartz and his brothers, considered Fort Worth’s premier photographers, were unaware that the dandily-dressed men were notorious outlaws. Pleased with his work, Swartz placed a copy of the photo in his studio window. It wasn’t until a Pinkerton detective recognized one of the men in the photo that Swartz knew he had taken what was to become a legendary portrait of “the Wild Bunch.” The five men were Harry Longbaugh (the Sundance Kid), Ben Kilpatrick, George Lee Roy Parker (Butch Cassidy), Will Carver and Harvey Logan. They had been in Fort Worth for two months, but by the time law enforcement issued the poster on May 15, 1901, the elusive gang had already moved on. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid were never captured.
    sponsored by: mollie l. and garland m. lasater, jr.

    Located East side of Main between 5th & 6th Streets

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    Amon G. Carter, Sr.~Heritage Trails Marker

    by Yaqui Updated Nov 6, 2011

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    The plaque reads:

    From his arrival in Fort Worth in 1905 until his death, Amon Carter was the city’s most vigorous booster and champion. At his death, it was said that more than half of the city’s workers were employed by businesses Carter helped establish. As the owner and publisher of the
    Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Carter tirelessly promoted Fort Worth and West Texas and was responsible for the paper’s masthead, “Where the West begins.”
    Through his national influence, Carter brought World War I and II military bases and manufacturing plants to Fort Worth. In 1922 he established WBAP, Fort Worth’s first radio station with studios in the Blackstone Hotel. In 1948, Carter started Texas’ first TV station, WBAP Channel 5.
    The Amon Carter Museum, one of the nation’s premiere art museums, features his collection of Remington and Russell, as well as other American art.
    sponsored by: amon g. carter foundation.

    East side of Main between 5th & 6th Streets

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