Fort Worth Off The Beaten Path

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by Yaqui
  • historic cabin - downtown grapevine
    historic cabin - downtown grapevine
    by jkruit
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by Yaqui

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Fort Worth

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Firestation#2 1930 - Hazmat Station

    by Yaqui Updated Nov 6, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    Herman Paul Koeppe of Wyatt C. Hedrick's office designed this facility which is actually two separate buildings. The larger building is the station itself, and the smaller building is a Fire Alarm Signal Station. These buildings are good examples of the Zigzag Moderne Style of the Art Deco era. One notable feature of the building is a 70 foot high siren tower located to the rear of the Fire Station. The tower looks like a miniature version of the Will Rogers Pioneer Tower, designed by Koeppe a few years later. As with many Zigzag Moderne buildings, the fire station uses ornate brick work to carry out the design. The building is still used by the Fort Worth Fire Department as the Central Station. The Alarm Signal Station also houses the Code Enforcement Division for the City of Fort Worth. R.F. Ball was the General Contractor for the building.http://www.fortwortharchitecture.com/fire2.htm

    Location: 1000 Cherry, Fort Worth Texas 76102

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Horsethief

    by Yaqui Updated Nov 6, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    3 more images

    Horsethief by Jack Bryant 1989. This depicts a Horsethief trying to escape into Mexico with a stolen Cavalry horse. As we all know back then the end result if you got caught you most certainly get jail time, fined and the worst scenario was being possibly hanged.

    The plaque reads: "Cross the creek to the Rio is where I'd like to be and if this old horse won't make this jump, this will be the end of me."

    Located on Camp Bowie Boulevard & Clifton Street right across front the Kimbell Art Museum

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    High Desert Princess

    by Yaqui Updated Nov 6, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    This lovely statue is called the “High Desert Princess” She stands in tribute to all cowgirls and stands in grandeur in front of The National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame. She was donated and commissioned by The Burnett Foundation and sculpted by Mehl Lawson.

    The museum is located at 1720 Gendy Street in the heart of Fort Worth's Cultural District.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    First Masonic Hall In Fort Worth Historical Marker

    by Yaqui Updated Nov 6, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    3 more images

    The plaque reads:
    After many years of debate, Fort Worth researchers identified this site in 1957 as the location of the city's first Masonic lodge. For more than twenty years, lodge members met in a two-story hall at this location. The group organized in 1854 and received its charter the following year as Fort Worth Masonic Lodge No. 148, A.F. & A.M. Members initially rented space for meetings and began construction on their own lodge hall in 1857. The new building offered space for lodge functions on the second floor, which was a single room, and the Masonic group operated a school on the ground level. The first floor space was divided into two rooms and was available for public meetings and church services.

    Donated to the lodge by Middleton T. Johnson, the site of the lodge once lay outside the city's populated area. The hall sat well beyond the old fort grounds, and even at about four blocks east of the public square it was built on unplatted land outside the city's business district. Although plain in appearance, the red-brick building signified progress and civilization. Its two stories faced west with a bell tower over the main entrance. In 1871, Lawrence Steel, a member, sold the lodge an English-made bell (c. 1782) that became known as the Masonic bell. It rang to announce stagecoach arrivals, fires and the start of the school day.
    By 1878, the Masons had outgrown their lodge hall at this site, and they moved to a new building at Second and Main. Lodge No. 148 has continued to be a strong presence in the community, spawning an additional fifteen lodges in Fort Worth. (2006)

    315 E. Belknap (temporarily at Main and Belknap, 3 blocks SW of actual site)

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Southwestern Exposition and Livestock Show

    by Yaqui Updated Nov 6, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    The plaque reads:

    Fort Worth became an important trading and supply depot in the 1870s for Texas cattlemen driving herds to Northern markets. With the convergence of several railroads here in the 1870s and 1880s stockyard facilities began to appear along the railroad lines.
    In 1893 Boston investors purchased the Stockyards and organized the Fort Worth Stock Yards Company. The Company held the first livestock show at nearby Marine Creek in March 1896. The show's initial sucess was due mainly to the participation of members of the Texas Cattle Raisers Association (TCRA) whose Annual Meeting in Fort Worth coincided with the Show.
    The Fort Worth Stock Yards Company built an impressive livestock exchange building in 1903. In 1908, with the help of Armour & Co., Swift & Co., and TCRA members, the National Feeders and Breeders Show opened here in new Coliseum facilities. The show offered a variety of events including a cutting horse competition and a horse show. A Wild West show was added in 1916.
    The show, renamed Southwestern Exposition and Fat Stock Show in 1918, developed into a premier rodeo, livestock, and exhibition event. In 1943 the facilities were converted for U.S. military purposes and in 1944 the Show relocated to a site in west Fort Worth.
    Sesquicentennial of Texas Statehood 1845-1995

    Located off of Stockyards Blvd. & Rodeo Plaza, Fort Worth. In Front of Billy Bob's Texas

    Related to:
    • Business Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Tarrant County Courthouse Inside

    by Yaqui Updated Nov 6, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    Once inside the courthouse after I passed thru the medal decotrs and after enjoying the museum, I asked if it was OK, to roam through the courthouse. The guard said it was ok and to enjoy. So I wondered through each of floors, because along the walls were these wonderful historical photographs of the areas buildings and of local pioneer families. The building is graced with such a beautiful wood spiral stair case and a very beautiful dome ceiling. While on the fourth floor a guard asked if I saw the plaque that was dedicated to Assistant District Attorney Chris Marshall, 41, and John Edwards, 33 who were killed here. Wounded were Judge John G. Hill and Judge Clyde Ashworth, both of the state's appellate court for the Second District, and another assistant district attorney, Steven Conder, 28.

    He showed me the plaque and then showed me the courtroom this terrible event happened. It was nice to see he took such pride in where he worked and that he didn't want anyone to forget these two souls who lost their lives here. With that said, they court house is still a neat place to visit.

    100 West Weatherford Street Fort Worth, TX 76102-2115

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Business Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Tarrant County Courthouse Museum 1895

    by Yaqui Written Nov 6, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    I got curious and headed for the court house. I was hoping to find something that I had a hunch it would have, so when I entered the doorway, the security guards asked why I was here. I asked if they had a museum inside the courthouse. The guard waved me in and pointed to the little museum entrance. Once I passed through a metal dector, which is standard thru United States courthouses anymore, the guard pointed me to the museum entrance. It is just to the left of the main entrance. It is not very big, but has some wonderful artificates and exhibits.

    Located at the entrance at 100 Weatherford Street Fort Worth, TX 76102-2115.

    Related to:
    • Business Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Hell's Half Acre Historical Marker

    by Yaqui Updated Nov 6, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    The plaques reads:

    A notorious red light district known as Hell's Half Acre developed in this section of Fort Worth after the arrival of the Texas and Pacific Railway in 1876 launched a local economic boom. Fort Worth was soon the favorite destination for hundreds of cowboys, buffalo hunters, railroad workers, and freighters eager to wash off the trail dust and enjoy themselves. To meet the demand, a large number of saloons, dance halls, gambling houses, and bordellos opened between the Courthouse Square and the railroad depot. Illegal activities in Hell's Half Acre were tolerated by city officials because of their importance to the town's economy. The district prospered in the 1880s and added to Fort Worth's growing reputation as a rowdy frontier town. Famous gamblers Luke Short, Bat Masterson and Wyatt Earp and outlaws Sam Bass, Eugene Bunch, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid are known to have spent time in Hell's Half Acre. A 1906 newspaper headline calling the district Fort Worth's den of sin and refuge of criminals was representative of periodic efforts to clean up the district. These efforts proved unsuccessful until Army officials at Camp Bowie, established here during World War I, helped local officials shut the district down. (1993)

    Located off Houston and 12th Street, next to the Fort Worth Water Gardens

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    FT. Worth~Where the West Begins~Historical Marker

    by Yaqui Updated Nov 6, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The plaque reads:

    Founded June 6, 1849, as frontier post of Co. F., 2nd Dragoons, 8th Dept., U.S. Army. The commander, Maj. Ripley Arnold, named camp for his former superior officer, Maj. Gen William Jenkins Worth. In 4 years of operations, the post had but one serious Indian encounter. A town grew up alongside the fort, as center for supply stores and stagecoach routes. In 1856 Fort Worth became county seat of Tarrant County. A boom started after 1867 when millions of longhorns were driven through town en route to Red River Crossing and Chisholm Trial. Herds forded the Trinity below Courthouse Bluff, one block north of this site. Cowboys got supplies for the long uptrail drive and caroused in taverns and dance halls. After railroad arrived in 1876, increased cattle traffic won city the nickname of "Cowtown". By 1900, Fort Worth was one of world's largest cattle markets. Population tripled between 1900 and 1910. Growth continued, based on varied multimillion-dollar industries of meat packing, flour milling, grain storage, oil, aircraft plants and military bases. Fort Worth also has developed as a center of culture, with universities, museums, art galleries, theatres and a botanic garden.

    Located at the northwest corner of Houston & W. Belknap Streets, Fort Worth.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Opera Houses & Theaters ~ Heritage Trails Markers

    by Yaqui Updated Nov 6, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    The plaque reads:
    The Adelphi, Fort Worth’s first vaudeville theater, opened in 1876 at 3rd & Main but soon closed. Within a month, the “Theatre Comique” occupied the site, attracting audiences to its popular presentations of western-style variety entertainment. Greenwall’s Opera House opened in 1891 introducing Fort Worth audiences to legendary actors including Lily Langtry, Sarah Bernhardt, Lillian Russell, Douglas Fairbanks, and Ethel and Lionel Barrymore.

    The opulent Majestic Theater, seating 1,500 people and covering half a block, opened at 10th & Commerce Streets in 1910. Patrons at the Majestic enjoyed performances by internationally famous entertainers. A beautiful Fort Worth girl, Ginger Rogers, won a national dance contest on the Majestic stage, starting her on her way to becoming a major movie star. Bass Performance Hall, opened May 1, 1998, continues Fort Worth’s entertainment tradition.
    sponsored by: sundance square.

    East side of Main & 4th Streets

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    African-American History Heritage Trails Marker

    by Yaqui Updated Nov 6, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    Located on Intermodal Transportation Center walkway, 9th & Jones Streets.

    The plaque reads:
    The first African-American residents of Fort Worth were slaves who received the delayed news of their emancipation on June 19, 1865. Those who remained in the area began to build a community on the city’s east side. A blacksmith shop operated by John Pratt was the first known African-American business. Mount Gilead Baptist Church, 600 Grove Street, was organized in 1875.
    The community revolved around the Fraternal Bank & Trust Co. and the Masonic Lodge, both built in 1912 by prominent businessman William Madison “Gooseneck Bill” McDonald. Loans from McDonald’s bank enabled residents to purchase homes and start businesses. The community was served by several African-American doctors, including Dr. Riley Ransom, who opened a hospital in 1918.

    A mural by artist Paula Blincoe Collins (along the Intermodal Transportation Center walkway) depicts Fort Worth’s early African- American history.
    sponsored by: city of fort worth.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    The Stage Leaves From Here~Heritage Trails Marker

    by Yaqui Updated Nov 6, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    The plaque reads:
    Few images of the American West are more enduring than the stagecoach. On July 18, 1856, the United States mail line brought the first stagecoach to Fort Worth on its way to Fort Belknap. The stagecoach stopped at Steel’s Tavern at the present intersection of Bluff & Houston Streets, then headed west. At Fort Belknap, passengers and mail joined the Southern Overland mail line on its route connecting the East Coast to San Francisco.

    By the 1870s, daily service arrived and departed from Fort Worth’s El Paso Hotel on Main Street. With the arrival of the railroad in 1876, the city became the largest stagecoach terminus in the Southwest. In 1878 the Fort Worth and Yuma stage line was established, providing mail delivery on a “star route” to Yuma, Arizona. The six-horse team pulled the stage 1,560 miles on a 17-day trip, the longest daily stage line in existence at that time.
    sponsored by: wells fargo.

    East side of Main between 1st & 2nd Streets

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Gamblers & Gunfighters~Heritage Trails Marker

    by Yaqui Updated Nov 6, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    The plaque reads:
    In the 1880s, Fort Worth, “the queen city of the prairies,” was home to good hotels, restaurants, theaters, banks, 60 saloons and nine churches. Patrons dined at the elegant White Elephant Saloon with its 40-foot mahogany bar and climbed the broad carpeted stairs for a game of keno at Luke Short’s casino. Famous men of the West, including Bat Masterson, Wyatt Earp, “Doc” Holliday and “Longhair Jim” Courtright often frequented the casino.
    On the evening of February 8, 1887, Courtright, unsteadied by alcohol, was feuding with Short over protection money. A sharpshooter and former lawman, Courtright challenged Short to a gunfight. But his legendary draw failed him, and Courtright was buried with a procession of carriages six blocks long. A few years later, the mild-mannered 39-year-old Short was shot. He was buried near Courtright at Oakwood Cemetery on the city’s north side. Sponsored by: the sid w. richardson foundation.

    Located at West side of Main between 2nd & 3rd Streets

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Legacy of the Land Sculptures

    by Yaqui Written Nov 6, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    Located in the Stockyard District Rodeo Plaza, sculpted by artist Steve Teeters, created these wonderful Texas size sculptures made from steel. They are oversize belts and spurs. The belt is a bench too.

    Visitor Centers:
    FortWorth
    508 Main St.
    Sundance Square
    817-698-3300
    Mon-Sat: 10am to 6pm

    Stockyards National Historic District
    130 E. Exchange Ave.
    817-624-4741
    Mon-Sat: 9am to 6pm
    Sun: 10am to 4pm

    Fort Worth Cultural District
    3401 W. Lancaster
    817-882-8588
    Mon-Sat: 9am to 5pm

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Maria250's Profile Photo

    Bill Pickett Statue

    by Maria250 Updated Aug 10, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bill Pickett Statue
    1 more image

    Pls take a look at Mark's general tips. There you find interesting notes on Bill Pickett that became the first black inducted in the National Rodeo Cowboy Hall of Fame in Oklahoma City.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Fort Worth

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

93 travelers online now

Comments

Fort Worth Off The Beaten Path

Reviews and photos of Fort Worth off the beaten path posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Fort Worth sightseeing.

View all Fort Worth hotels