Fort Worth Off The Beaten Path

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by Yaqui
  • historic cabin - downtown grapevine
    historic cabin - downtown grapevine
    by jkruit
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by Yaqui

Best Rated Off The Beaten Path in Fort Worth

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    First United Methodist Church

    by Yaqui Updated Sep 12, 2010

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    This is a 130 year old church which caught my eye as I was venturing around the city. I just had to venture to this site to take pictures since it was such a beautiful and stunning structure. I have an appreciation for historical buildings, especially those that are still and used today and still loved by those who utilize it. Very lovely church.

    Church History

    800 West Fifth Street Fort Worth, Texas 76102
    On the corner of Henderson and W. 7th St.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Samuel Burk Burnett Park

    by Yaqui Updated Sep 12, 2010

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Without the water features
    3 more images

    Update: During my recent visit the water features have all been replaces with flowers and sculptures. They are lovely!

    I was very touched by the statement on the wall engraved. I think is says enough: "I S.B. Burnett do hereby give onto the city of Fort Worth, this land for the purpose of creating a place of recreation in the very heart of the city, as a public park and particulary for relief against the heat of our summer, and as resting spot for tired mothers and their children, said park shall be known as the Burnett Memorial Park, not for my own vain glory, but to perpetuate the memory of my two children, ANN & BURK now long gone from me."
    ~ S.B. Burnett - 1919 ~

    Ok, this touched my heart very much. It has these wonderful water displays all over the park. It is said it lights up at night. I could see that business people and mothers with their precious little ones strolling around the park. I think Mr. Burnett would have been so happy to see that!

    Location is at Cherry Ave and W. 7th St.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Trinity River Trails

    by Yaqui Updated Sep 12, 2010

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Beautiful path!

    If you like biking, jogging, rollerblading, and just plan walking around and enjoying nature. Then you will enjoy this 35 miles of network paved and natural paths that follows the river along with spectacular views of many parks and downtown.

    Make sure to take a map and water since drinks fountains are not regular on the paths.

    Stop by the Vistor Centers in the Stockyards or in the Will Rogers Memorial Center for information.

    One part of the trails leads you to the Zoo and Log Cabin Village which is nearby. Marriott Residence Inn and Courtyard is right across the street of the trail and river.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Tarrant County Courthouse

    by Yaqui Updated Sep 12, 2010

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    Built in 1895 and built to look like the Texas State Capital building in Austin. Made of red granite native to Texas. This is a beautiful historical building to see and appreciate the history of law that started and still is being passed down from this very building. It has many wonderful memorials dedicated to fireman, policeman, POW's/MIA's stone plaques located around the structure grounds. Venture around and take a look.

    100 W. Weatherford & Main Street. Located by the Sundance Square.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Samuel Burk Burnett Park Businessman Statue

    by Yaqui Updated Sep 12, 2010

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    This statue is huge and must be over or at least 50 feet high. It is very impressive to see this structure stand up on its own.

    Seems while researching about this piece of artwork, or to some is a giant size cookie cutter. While the city was finding room to install the structure they had to removed some very old trees. The parks service said they relocated these trees to other parks to be preserved, but not without angering many because they had a huge protest about it.

    Still, as you look up into the sky at this statue whether is has the blue with clouds floating by behind it or up against the city business buildings, it is impressive. I had to touch it! I can appreciate the artistry in it. You must go take a look at for sure.

    Location is at Cherry Ave and W. 7th St.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Sweetberry1's Profile Photo

    Wine and Romance

    by Sweetberry1 Written Sep 26, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Strawberry Kiss

    Speciality Wine...Strawberry Kiss.

    I have already mentioned the Speciality Wines, made by Lightcatcher Winery, Ft. Worth Texas. This one makes me curious enough to definitely visit.
    If anyone has tasted this Strawberry Kiss, perhaps you can let me know how sweet it was.. ;-)

    Related to:
    • Wine Tasting

    Was this review helpful?

  • Sweetberry1's Profile Photo

    Delaney Vinyards

    by Sweetberry1 Updated Sep 26, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Delaney Vinyards

    Texas Rose.. is a blend of Chardonnay and Cabernet Franc grapes grown at Delaney Vineyards in Lamesa, Texas.
    This wine won a Bronze Medal in the 2002 Dallas Morning News International Wine Competition.

    Delaney Vineyards
    2000 Champagne Boulevard
    Grapevine, TX

    Related to:
    • Wine Tasting

    Was this review helpful?

  • Sweetberry1's Profile Photo

    Texas White

    by Sweetberry1 Written Sep 26, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Chardonnay Grapes

    Texas White is a pure Chardonnay variety grown at Delaney Vineyards in Lamesa, Texas.
    Texas White is a semi-sweet white wine suited to complement any seafood or white meat dishes. This wine is also excellent as a before or after dinner drink, and pairs well with cheese and crackers.

    Grapevine

    Related to:
    • Wine Tasting

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Rodeo Plaza Murals

    by Yaqui Updated Sep 12, 2010

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    3 more images

    As you walk the hallway, hopefully you will notice the wonderful beautiful murals that adorn the upper part of the walls. To me they represent the history of Ft. Worth. I just was taken by them. Most just say "That's Nice. Not me, I have a appreciate for all art, especially mural art that is sometimes lost by a layer of paint.

    Located at 2501 Rodeo Plaza & Exchange.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Won't Believe Your Eyes!

    by Yaqui Updated Sep 12, 2010

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    This is the Tarrant Civil Court House designed by Fort Worth Architect Wyatt C. Hedrick's. Yet later, 1988, Architect George C.T. Woo was hired to put a facade on the building. It has painted facades that makes it looks like it has texture and depth. The painted designs on this building give it a 3D effect. From a distance it looks like it has actual stone facade when it doesn't. It impressed me.

    Located at 100 N. Houston . Next to the Tarrant County Court House.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Cowtown Cattlepen Maze

    by grandmaR Written Sep 1, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ticket booth and water tank

    I do not know whether this is a Must See, Off the Beaten Track or a Tourist Trap, because I have not done it.

    You pay $4.95 (for an adult) or $3.25 (for children 5-12) and get to try to find your way through a wooden maze made up of over 5,400 square feet of frequently changed wooden pathways, resembling the cattlepens of the old west. They apparently have races and other games with prizes.

    The ticket booth is beside the water tank across from the Stockyard Station, and there is a second-story observation deck gives a place to watch people try the maze along with a vista of the entire Stockyards area.

    I put an inset in of the side of the maze because it doesn't look very big from the street.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Adventure Travel
    • Trains

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Stairs to Nowhere & Historical Marker

    by Yaqui Updated Oct 10, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    In 1929, the Blackstone Hotel was the first sky scraper in Downtown Fort Worth. These steps once graced many legends. Bob Hope, Elvis, John Wayne and every U.S. president from Herbert Hoover to Richard Nixon once walked these stairs to the front desk and the elegant ballroom on the second floor.

    Courtyard Marriott Blackstone Hotel
    The first art deco skyscraper in Fort Worth, the Blackstone Hotel was erected in 1929 for Wealthy Cattleman C. A. “Gus” O’Keefe, who named it after a visit to the Blackstone Hotel in Chicago. The St. Louis architectural firm of Mauran, Russell, and Crowell designed the structure. The city’s first radio station, WBAP, once occupied the 22nd floor. A five-story annex was added in the 1950’s by the Hilton Hotel chain, which occupied the building from 1952 to 1962. Featuring original sash windows, irregular setbacks and ornamental terra cotta detailing, the Blackstone Hotel remains the city’s tallest Pre-World War II structure.
    Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1998

    601 Main Street
    Fort Worth, Texas 76102 USA

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Grand Hotels~Heritage Trails Markers

    by Yaqui Written Oct 10, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    In March 1878, the lavish El Paso Hotel opened on this block. The three-storied, gas-lit, first class hotel featured a telephone and billiard room. It quickly became the major gathering place for city leaders, businessmen, visitors, actors and gamblers. Regularly scheduled stagecoach service from the hotel allowed passengers to connect with trains to the east or take the 1560-mile stage journey west to Yuma.

    Additions were made to the hotel and it was renamed the Pickwick. The hotel’s name changed to the Delaware in 1891. The Delaware was demolished in 1911, and the seven-story Westbrook Hotel opened on the site. In 1917, the Westbrook’s crowded lobby became the center of frenzied oil boom activity. A lobby sculpture was named the “golden goddess” because of the many oil deals made around her. The Westbrook was torn down in 1978 and the “golden goddess” now resides at the Petroleum Club at 7th and Main Streets.
    sponsored by: susan kelly blue, m.d.

    East side of Main between 3rd & 4th Streets

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    Opera Houses & Theaters ~ Heritage Trails Markers

    by Yaqui Updated Nov 6, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    The plaque reads:
    The Adelphi, Fort Worth’s first vaudeville theater, opened in 1876 at 3rd & Main but soon closed. Within a month, the “Theatre Comique” occupied the site, attracting audiences to its popular presentations of western-style variety entertainment. Greenwall’s Opera House opened in 1891 introducing Fort Worth audiences to legendary actors including Lily Langtry, Sarah Bernhardt, Lillian Russell, Douglas Fairbanks, and Ethel and Lionel Barrymore.

    The opulent Majestic Theater, seating 1,500 people and covering half a block, opened at 10th & Commerce Streets in 1910. Patrons at the Majestic enjoyed performances by internationally famous entertainers. A beautiful Fort Worth girl, Ginger Rogers, won a national dance contest on the Majestic stage, starting her on her way to becoming a major movie star. Bass Performance Hall, opened May 1, 1998, continues Fort Worth’s entertainment tradition.
    sponsored by: sundance square.

    East side of Main & 4th Streets

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Yaqui's Profile Photo

    John M. and Obie P. Leonard Historical Marker

    by Yaqui Updated Oct 17, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    The verbage may not be complete since the bronze lettering was hard to see, but here is what most of the marker I could translate and type up:

    The history of John Marvin Leonard and Obie Paul Leonard
    Two farm boys, with ingenuity, determination and $600, built a business empire.

    When the doors opened on a small store across the street from the Tarrant County Courthouse in 1918, no one could have predicted that those countries made of boards on barrels and washtub display cases would grow into a business empire that would have such a monumental community wide impact.

    But thus is the story of the Leonard’s and Fort Worth. With little more than $600 and a great deal of foresight, Mr. Marvin Leonard began business in a 1500 sq ft. store. He was joined by younger brother Obie one year later. Together, Mr. Marvin and Mr. Obie, filled with the frontier spirit and optimistic vision, created far more than a mercantile center on the north end of the central business district. As the city grew and prospered, the Leonard Brothers grew and prospered, and good citizens that they were, they gave financial support and help to their adopted city.

    Significantly, the business they created with the philosophy of “more merchandise for less money” expanded most during periods of economic adversity, during the dark, early days of the great depression, they moved their store into its own block long building, thereby creating new jobs and generating activity in the downtown area.

    This kind of growth can not be entirely attributed to the fact that the Leonard Brothers Store, as it was know early on, carried merchandise as varied as stove bolts and fashion, saddles and pastries. More, it was a feeling Mr. Marvin and Mr. Obie were able to convey in their personal actions, and through their thousands of employees – to treat every customer as you would want to be treated.

    This spirit of genuine concern for their customers led to innovations in merchandising. For example, the installation of one of the first escalators south of the mason-dixon line drew 40,000 enthusiastic riders and sightseers during the first day of operation. Perhaps the most spectacular creation was the stores own subway system the M&O Subway Express carried passengers from a 14 acre parking lot into the store….for free. The creative approach brought shoppers thronging into the store. The result was that this system brought people into the downtown area to conduct other business, to their jobs, and to other stores. What the Leonard Brothers had done was to create a highly successful, even through small scale, mass transit system that benefitted no only their business, but also the entire downtown business community, and the remarkable thing is, it didn’t cost the city a cent. When the store was sold to the Tandy Corporation on October 30, 1967, the complex converted six blocks, offices over 100,000 square feet of merchandise, and employed 1,000 people. Mr. Marvin and Mr. Obie, as they were affectionately known, may have been two farm boys from Cass Country, not the business empire they began in Fort Worth carried their fame across the nation as retailers of extraordinary kind.

    Mr. Marvin, who died in 1970, expanded his holdings to include oil, ranches, and more.

    Besides the philanthropic activities which consumed much of his energy, Mr. Marvin had a hobby that his recreational activities, his giving nature and his business acumen, he built country clubs with extraordinary golf courses.

    It is thanks to his desire for perfection that country blub and shady oaks country club have courses recognized as being among the finest in the world.

    His major sports contributions, however focused their attention of the world on Fort Worth, for it was Mr. Marvin’s convincing nature that brought the U.S. Open to colonial in 1941, and which resulted in the colonial national invitational beginning 1946.

    Mr. Obie, too, has had divergent business interests he has devoted a great deal of energy into ranching, pecan farming, oil, saving and loan associations, insurance, and holdings in commercial and industrial property.

    Boy scouting has claimed Mr. Obies interest for over 40 years, he served as President of the Longhorn Council for 13 years, and continued to serve as a member of the regional board of the Boy Scouts of America. As a leader in scouting, he was presented the highest BSA Council honor, The Silver Beaver. He was also presented The Antelope, The highest BSA Regional Award, a Ranch he donated to the council has been named amp Leonard in his honor.

    Individually, and together, Mr. Marvin and Mr. Obie Leonard created a retail empire of worldwide fame and an outstanding record of civic contributions.

    Located on Houston (next to Texas de Brazil) and Weatherford Street.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Fort Worth

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

79 travelers online now

Comments

Fort Worth Off The Beaten Path

Reviews and photos of Fort Worth off the beaten path posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Fort Worth sightseeing.

View all Fort Worth hotels