Galveston Favorites

  • Favorites
    by msbrandysue
  • Damage of the railing of the seawall
    Damage of the railing of the seawall
    by msbrandysue
  • Left Corner of the Flagship
    Left Corner of the Flagship
    by msbrandysue

Most Recent Favorites in Galveston

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    Hurricane Past and Present

    by msbrandysue Written May 3, 2009

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    Favorite thing: Galveston is recently recovering from Hurrican Ike which hit in September of 2008. They ordered everyone off the island and those who wanted to stay, could. However, the death toll was never even released because of the missing.

    Much of the island was devastated. Houses were demolished, if they could even be found. Debrit can still be found and you can tell some of the houses are still without hope. Of course, many of these houses had no homeowners isurance so it'll take months and years to replace them.

    The most evident destruction is that of The Flagship. The left corner was damaged, as well as the bridge leading onto the property.

    But Galveston wants you to visit! When asked how could Houstonians (or anyone) help Galveston made it clear they needed their tourists. They need the business in order to afford to stay on top. Just beware that some of the attractions may not be open...such as the Seaport Museum and Pier 21 Theatre.

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    Pirate History of Galveston???

    by msbrandysue Written Jun 20, 2008

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    Favorite thing: Interesting history here!

    While walking along the seawall I was reading all the plaques that begin the 10 mile stretch. I was reading part of the coastal birding trail when at the bottom there was an interesting history fact.

    The sign read, " While Galveston is actually named after Bernardo de Galvez, a Spanish colonial governor and general, Galveston was one named 'Campache' by pirates Jean and Pierre LaFitte in the early 1800s!"

    Go figure....

    (I thought it was cool)

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    Gulf Coast Birding Trails

    by msbrandysue Written Jun 20, 2008

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    Favorite thing: Although I don't really engage too much in the birding trails of the gulf coast Galveston is a central place for those who love it. Among Fort San Jacinto to the east and along the Seawall are many signs posted for the birding trail that outline birds found in the area.

    Check out the pictures to see various plaques around Galveston :)

    Fondest memory: http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/huntwild/wild/wildlife_trails/coastal/

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    Water Cleanliness

    by msbrandysue Written Jun 18, 2008

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    Favorite thing: So I'm betting if you're on this site you've seen some really beautiful beaches in your life. However, I don't think anyone comes to Galveston for the beautiful water.

    Yep, it's dark and nasty looking. And most of us, Houstonians, look past that. Even the seaweed all over the beaches (on occassion).

    My point: don't expect the beaches you find in the Carribbeans or anything of that sort....

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  • msbrandysue's Profile Photo

    Hurricane History

    by msbrandysue Updated Jun 18, 2008

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    Favorite thing: Galveston takes pride in its recovery from the most devastating natural distaster in US history. You can see many of the memorials and landmarks on the Seawall. There are also more references at the Pier 21 museum.

    Fondest memory: The Galveston Hurricane of 1900 made landfall on the city of Galveston, Texas on September 8, 1900. It had estimated winds of 135 mph (215 km/h) at landfall, making it a Category 4 storm on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale.

    The hurricane caused great loss of life. The death toll has been estimated to be between 6,000 and 12,000 individuals; the number most cited in official reports is 8,000, giving the storm the third-highest number of casualties of any Atlantic hurricane, after the Great Hurricane of 1780 and 1998’s Hurricane Mitch. The Galveston Hurricane of 1900 is to date the deadliest natural disaster ever to strike the United States. By contrast, the second-deadliest storm to strike the United States, the 1928 Okeechobee Hurricane, caused approximately 2,500 deaths, and the deadliest storm of recent times, Hurricane Katrina, claimed the lives of approximately 1,800 people.

    The hurricane occurred before the practice of assigning official code names to tropical storms was instituted, and thus it is commonly referred to under a variety of descriptive names. Typical names for the storm include the Galveston Hurricane of 1900, the Great Galveston Hurricane, and, especially in older documents, the Galveston Flood. It is often referred to by Galveston locals as The Great Storm or The 1900 Storm.

    -Taken From Wikipedia

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    The Historic Strand District

    by msbrandysue Updated Jun 18, 2008

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    Favorite thing: The Galveston Strand is a very famous area. It has more restored Victorian houses than any other town in the United States. Many of the houses are available for tour throughout the year. They are even decorated nicely for Christmas.

    While shopping in the Strand you will see many historical markers. Don't pass these up!

    Also, you can take the Strand trolley around to view many of the more famous homes.

    If you enjoy that kind of traveling I know you will love touring houses such as Bishop's Palace.

    While you're in the area don't forget the fun shopping and sidewalk cafes. Or, try one of the other railroad or history museums.

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    Kauffman and Runge Building--220 22nd Street

    by VeronicaG Updated Jan 8, 2007

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    Kauffman & Runge Building

    Favorite thing: As we walked to the Strand for the festivities, we passed the Kauffman and Runge Building(1882). It certainly was a striking structure! According to the handbook, it's an example of the 'modern High Victorian version of the Renaissance style'. The architect was Eugene T. Heiner of Houston.

    The ribbed and paneled brick walls and varying arch shapes with contrasting trim colors was the American version of a classical architecture style.

    This business was a grocery wholesaling and cotton export firm, which unfortunately became bankrupt in 1887. The building was acquired in 1905, by Maco Stewart, who used it as his office and headquarters for the Stewart Title company.

    In recent years, Stewart Title moved its headquarters to Houston, but continues to use the building which was refurbished in 1977 by architect David D. Barker of Galveston.

    For more information see Galveston Architecture Handbook by Ellen Beasley and Stephen Fox, Rice University Press and Galveston Historical Foundation

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    The Galveston Opera House--2012-20 Post Off.st.

    by VeronicaG Updated Jan 8, 2007

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    The Galveston Opera House
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    Favorite thing: On the day we visited, a wedding was being set up in the Opera House. What a unique idea! Although we had to take a quick look around, I did manage to snap a couple pictures. Picture #2 shows the private boxes from which I'd love to enjoy an opera!

    The rounded arched entrance of this Opera House makes for a grand impression. The building is comprised of red pressed brick with terra cotta elements and is in the style of Boston architect H.H. Richardson. The architect of this building, however, was a little known individual from New Orleans, Frank Cox, but he created a medieval Romanesque structure that would make H.H. proud!

    Theatrical organizer, Henry Greenwall, convinced a group of Galveston businessmen to invest in a 1,500 seat theatre and 56 room hotel, which was constructed in 1895-96. The theatre operated until 1974 when it was bought by the Cultural Arts Council and restored. It is still a venue for entertaining the public year round.

    The first phase of the restoration (1981)was carried out by Hardy Holzman Pfeiffer and Asso. of New York; the second (1986)by Killis Almond and Asso. of San Antonio. It is the only remaining theater of Henry Greenwall's.

    For more information see Galveston Architecture Handbook by Ellen Beasley and Stephen Fox, Rice University Press and Galveston Historical Foundation

    Related to:
    • Seniors
    • Theater Travel
    • Music

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    Blum Hardware Building-2211-2223 Strand St.

    by VeronicaG Updated Dec 21, 2006

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    Old Galveston Square
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    Favorite thing: This large building (1871) sits along Strand Street and presently holds an art gallery, gift, clothing and collectible shops. It originally consisted of four separate structures: The Berlocher Building, Henry Runge Coffee Import Company, T.W. House Building and E.S. Wood Building, the latter having a full iron front.

    During the early 20th century, the Blum Hardware Company razed the building, creating one large space and for the sake of unity remodeled the facade. It was updated in 1986 by Melton Henry Architects of Houston for real estate developer J.R. McConnell and renamed Old Galveston Square, a shopping arcade. A concrete and steel cornet was designed by artist David Adickes of Houston. This construction is a post modern example of a Victorian Conservatory. Decorative ironwork in the newly designed interior court was done by Joe Pehoski of Salado,Texas.

    The building was again remodeled by Eubanks/Bonn Associates, creating a number of shop interiors after Mr. and Mrs. George Mitchell purchased it in 1987. The Mardi Gras Museum is located on the third floor. Please see additional photo for interior photo.

    For more information see Galveston Architecture Guidebook by Ellen Beasley and Stephen Fox, Rice University Press and Galveston Historical Foundation.

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    The United States National Bank Building

    by VeronicaG Updated Dec 21, 2006

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    The U.S. National Bank Building

    Favorite thing: This building looms over the other buildings near 2201 Market Street. It's the United States National Bank Building (1925) whose construction was planned and directed by David W. Kempner, son of wholesale grocer, cotton factor and real estate investor, H, Kempner. The architect was Alfred C. Bossom of Sanguinet, Staats and Hedrick.

    The bank building is noted for it's 'chamfered corner crowned by a clock face atop the entrance. It has a dark granite base, smooth limestone facing and tall arched windows separarated by Corinthian pilasters.' The bank was refurbished by David Watson in 1990.

    Apparently the Kempners and the Moody's of Galveston (for whom the Magnolia Petroleum Building was constructed in 1920) were rivals in business. This construction gave the competing businessman notice of their equality.

    For more information see Galveston Architecture Guidebook by Ellen Beasley and Stephen Fox, Rice University Press and Galveston Historical Foundation

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  • VeronicaG's Profile Photo

    The Cotton Exchange-2102 Exchange St.

    by VeronicaG Updated Dec 21, 2006

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    The Cotton Exchange Building

    Favorite thing: This building replaced the original one of 1879 and represents Texas's cotton era. It was constructed in 1940 by architect Ben Milam and is of white block and polished granite, looking more modern than its neighbors.

    Compared to the lovely detailed buildings surrounding it, I think it looks rather dull, but I wanted to highlight it for its involvement in Texas's supremely commercial crop of earlier days--COTTON--which brought this state on an even par with other movers and shakers in world financial markets.

    For more information see Galveston Architecture Handbook by Ellen Beasley and Stephen Fox, Rice University Press and Galveston Historical Foundation

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    • Architecture
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    Ball, Hutchings and Sealy Buildings

    by VeronicaG Updated Dec 21, 2006

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    Ball, Hitchings and Sealy Buildings

    Favorite thing: It's hard to miss this striking building, which overlooks Strand Street. It was constructed (1896) in the classical revival style by architect, N.J.Clayton, while retaining some Victorian elements.

    It is comprised of gray and pink granite with red sandstone, buff brick and terra cotta decorations and is the earliest example of steel frame construction in Texas. It housed a bank which operated here until 1935.

    Recently used as a moving and storage warehouse, it was purchased by Cynthia & George Mitchell in 1985 and refurbished by architects, Ford Powell & Carson. Additional work was done by Dallas architect, Michael Malone, as he designed the Discovery Channel Store in 1994.

    For more information see Galveston Architecture Guidebook by Ellen Beasley and Stephen Fox, Rice University Press and Galveston Historican Foundation

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    • Architecture
    • Singles
    • Seniors

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  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    Could have spent a week

    by keeweechic Updated Mar 29, 2003

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    Favorite thing: Galveston was a wonderful surprise. I was looking forward to seeing the ocean again after living land-locked for 2 1/2 years. Prior to our trip we had been following the progress of Hurricane Isidore in the Gulf. We set out anyway and hoped for the best.

    We had only planned on spending one night in Galveston before driving on to Louisiana - Baton Rouge then New Orleans. The morning we were to leave we thought , to hell with going to Baton Rouge, we need another day/night in Galveston. The weather was still great although very windy and we crammed in as much as possible. Really we could have stayed a week. A great place to go, just don't go during hurricane season. Fortunately 'Izzy' turned back into a tropical storm and hit further around the Gulf Coast (where we were later headed).

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    A great place to start your...

    by SeaJ1877 Written Aug 26, 2002

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    Favorite thing: A great place to start your visit is Pier 21. There you will find The Texas Seaport Museum. There you can learn about Galvestons seaborne legacy and walk the decks and explore the Tall Ship Elissa. You can also check out the immagration data base.

    Also you will find the Pier 21 theater which features 'The Great Storm' which is about the deadliest natural disaster that devastated Galveston island in 1900.

    The other feature film is 'The Pirate Island of Jean Laffite.

    You will also find places to eat and shop along pier 21. There is also a Boat tour located here although I have never taken that tour. Yet.

    Fondest memory: Hard to say what I miss the most when away from Galveston. I think I would have to say the Tall Elissa. I could spend all day on board.

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  • visit Moody Gardens. A...

    by pat110 Updated Aug 24, 2002

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    Favorite thing: visit Moody Gardens. A beautiful facility, inside and out and you can spend the entire day (which we did) wandering through the exhibits! The tropical rain forest is especially nice with the fish, birds and plants.

    Fondest memory: It was refreshing and seemed much cooler and more comfortable after a long drive from Lake Conroe.

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