Dinosaur Valley State Park, Glen Rose

4 out of 5 stars 11 Reviews

1058 Park Rd. 59, Glen Rose, Tx 254-898-1526

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  • Site #2 in the summer
    Site #2 in the summer
    by VeronicaG
  • A Laza Swim in the Afternoon
    A Laza Swim in the Afternoon
    by VeronicaG
  • Three-Toed Dinosaur Prints
    Three-Toed Dinosaur Prints
    by VeronicaG
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    Something New Has Been Added...Dino World!

    by VeronicaG Updated Jul 27, 2008

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    Looks like fun!

    Tying in with Dinosaur Valley State Park, Dinosaur World may be just what the kids need to help visualize these prehistoric creatures. Although this attraction is not connected with the state park, it does nicely contribute to the learning experience.

    You'll see over one hundred life-size dinosaurs in a pleasant woodsy setting, read about their characteristics and appreciate their true size. T-Rex, Brachiosaurus, Spinosaurus and Triceratops are all waiting to be discovered!

    Pack a picnic lunch and linger for a while, visit the gift shop to find fossils, toys, artifacts, educational materials and perhaps even some dinosaur eggs. A fossil dig can uncover a real shark's tooth, dinosaur fragments or some other treasure that can be taken home.

    Our 13 year old grandson thought he was too old for this attraction, but it would most likely be appealing for those children age 12 and under. Actually, I think I would have liked it!

    Hours are 9 am daily. Admission is $12.75 for adults; $10.75 for seniors and $9.75 for kids 3-12. There is no charge for parking.

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    A Record In The Rocks

    by VeronicaG Updated Jul 26, 2008

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    A Cast Of Imprints

    At the entrance to the park, you'll find this display, which is an actual cast of some of the footprints found along the Puluxy River. If the water level is high, it might be difficult to see the actual prints. When we traveled there in December, it had rained for two days previously. The tracks were still visible on site #1.

    There are fifteen different sites extending from Del Rio to north of Dallas that mark the presence of these prehistoric creatures. It is thought that great storms prevalent in those times, drove the dinosaurs from marshes and upland forests down to the flats bordering what was then the Gulf of Mexico. The Gulf had moved towards the central and north-central parts of Texas during the Cretaceous period.

    It was exciting to actually see evidence of these prehistoric creatures. I want to return to see all of the sites on our next visit.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park

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    The Monsters Come Marching One By One...

    by VeronicaG Updated Jul 26, 2008

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    Three-toed dinosaur tracks

    Look closely into the water and you'll see tracks. Three toed tracks, to be exact. These dinosaur imprints were made millions of years ago in the soft mud edging an old river basin skirted by the Puluxy river, which cut through the ancient rock formations and still winds through Dinosaur Valley State Park today.

    Here's some history of the site: The tracks were first discovered in 1909, but this wasn't widely known until 1938 when Roland T. Bird of the American Museum of Natural History visited. He discovered several sites, but the most surprising were imprints of a giant sauropod dinosaur (similar to a brontosaurus) with a second set of prints found alongside the first prints--those of a large carniverous dinosaur.

    Mr. Bird felt that these particular prints laying side by side in the rock recorded an actual predator hunting its prey. They were removed and sent to New York, where they were displayed at the museum. Happily, many more prints are still in place at the park!

    There are other sites in the park containing dinosaur imprints. A map can be obtained at the office at the park entrance, where a moderate admission fee is charged. You can call ahead to make sure the tracks are visible.

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    A Return Visit--Site #2

    by VeronicaG Updated Jul 17, 2008

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    Site #2 in the summer
    2 more images

    UPDATE: We returned to Glen Rose during the summer and were able to visit the entire site #2 area this time. Certain areas were roped off with plastic tape, affording a great view of the dinosaur footprints. (New pics provided)

    Over Christmas, we drove to Glen Rose to see the dinosaur tracks with some of our family. This time we had just enough daylight to see Site #2, also. Most of the prints seemed to be on the other side of the river, however.

    A track guide at the site was very helpful in locating some prints nearby. According to the guide, a Sauropod most likely made the print shown in this picture. We had an exciting time finding the prints and trying to identify which creature made them!

    picture #2 Dinosaur Footprints
    picture #3 A handy track guide

    The river was shallow enough here to attempt a crossing, but we weren't wearing appropriate clothes to do so. Unfortunately site #3 was not open to exploration, but maybe next time!

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    Swimming in the Paluxy

    by VeronicaG Written Jul 17, 2008

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    A Laza Swim in the Afternoon

    A summer excursion to Dinosaur Valley State Park added something new to the mix--swimming in the Paluxy River.

    Site #1, which I have already described in an earlier tip, is the ideal spot to cool off in the summer. A ledge which contains the dino footprints, allows for a shallow wade into the river, while the middle is deep enough to swim and in some spots dive.

    Families towed inner tubes and floats down a narrow path and over and around boulders, managing to carry all that they needed to make it a relaxing afternoon.

    There was little shade when we visited around 2 p.m.

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    • Family Travel

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    A Gift From The World's Fair

    by VeronicaG Updated Jan 11, 2008

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    Creatures from the Past

    These giant creatures were once on display at the New York World's Fair in 1964-65. Our family traveled to the fair that year--I remember the occasion was positively overwhelming and a magnificent event!

    The Atlantic Richfield Company donated the 70 foot Brontosaurus/Apatosaurus and a 45 foot Tyrannosaurus Rex to the park. It is noted that the head of the Apatosaurus had to be replaced to give a more accurate picture of its appearance.

    You'll see these dinosaurs after you pass the park office at the entrance to the park. If you're traveling with children, you definitely have to stop to get an up close and personal photo!

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park

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    The Dinosaur Print

    by keeweechic Updated Aug 30, 2004

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    The Dinosaur tracks were formed 100,000,000 years ago in this area. For years following their discovery (about 1910), the tracks remained more of a novelty. When the Paluxy river levels were low, Farmers actually caught catfish stranded in them.

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    The Tyrannosaurus rex (T-Rex)

    by keeweechic Written Oct 21, 2003

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    Known as the King Tyrant Lizard. This was the larges carnivore to ever walk the earth some 100 to 65 million years ago. They stalked western North America from Montana to Texas and one specimen weighed in at 8 tons and 50 ft long. The jaw alone was 3 feet with 60 serrated teeth up to 7 inches long. A huge creature capable of intimidating smaller predators. This replica is 45ft tall.

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    The Apatosaurus

    by keeweechic Written Oct 21, 2003

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    This dinosaur was formerly known as Brontosaurus which meant ‘thunder lizard’. They were among the largest of the land animals known to have lived from 160 to 140 million years ago. The roamed western North America from Montana to Oklahoma to Baja California and one specimen measured 75 feet long and most likely weighed around 33 tons. This size however didn’t extend to its brain which was the size of a human fist.

    Their very long necks allowed them to nibble on tender twigs and needles at the tops of pine, fir and sequoia trees. They needed a quarter ton of food per day. This replica is 70ft tall.

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    Dinosaur Models

    by keeweechic Written Oct 21, 2003

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    Once entering the park you can take the road to the Dinosaur models. You can’t miss these huge fiberglass models of the tyrannosaurus rex and Apatosaurus. They were originally created for the New York City Worlds Fair in 1964-65 before being donated to the park in 1970.

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    Dinosaur Valley State Park

    by keeweechic Updated Oct 21, 2003

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    The state park covers over 1500 acres and was designated a National Natural Landmark in 1969. There are camping and picnic facilities as well as a 6 mile hiking trail system for both hiking and biking. Swimming and fishing is available in the Paluxy river.

    The park is well known for the proven facts that dinosaurs once roamed the area. In the river bed you can see the evidence of the dinosaur footprints made some 110 million years ago.

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