Unique Places in Houston

  • Getting to know Romulus
    Getting to know Romulus
    by ellsasha
  • Jean encourages an ageing Lobo to eat, RIP 3/27/11
    Jean encourages an ageing Lobo to eat,...
    by ellsasha
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by ellsasha

Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Houston

  • ellsasha's Profile Photo
    4 more images

    St. Francis Wolf Sanctuary

    by ellsasha Updated Dec 31, 2011

    Situated about an hour’s drive from Houston in Montgomery County, the refuge provides shelter for non-releasable wild and captive born wolves and hybrid wolf dogs. Jean Lefevre, a world travelled British lady, is the founder , whose first encounter with a wolf was in 1976 when she was studying with Twylah Nitsch , a Native American of the Seneca Wolf Clan, Iroquois Nation. It was in 2002 that she opened the sanctuary which currently is home to 14 animals. I have met all of them (in controlled circumstances), some of their stories are heartbreaking, but they are now at St. Francis where they will safely live out the remainder of their lives. The animals live in large fenced enclosures (fences go down in the ground for several feet to prevent digging out; compatible animals share an enclosure (maximum 2 wolves) where they are provided a low log cabin with front and back entrances for shelter, a large water tub for cooling off in the hot summers, plus a cool water sprinkler where they can take a light cooling shower on demand. The Sanctuary relies heavily on donations for support and has many dedicated volunteers. Well worth making the effort to visit. Visitors are welcome but visiting is by appointment only (closed Mondays and Fridays).

    Was this review helpful?

  • Maria250's Profile Photo

    Rules Of Texas

    by Maria250 Updated Aug 10, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1. Pull your droopy pants up. You look like an idiot.

    2. Let's get this straight, it's called a gravel road. I drive a pickup truck because I want to. No matter how slow you drive, you're going to get dust on your Lexus. Drive it or get out of the way.

    3. So every person in every pickup waves. It's called being friendly.
    Try to understand the concept.

    4. If that cell phone rings while a bunch of doves are coming in, we
    will shoot it out of your hand. You better hope you don't have it up to your ear at the time.

    5. Yeah, we eat beef. You really want sushi & caviar? It's available at the corner bait shop.

    6. We open doors for women. That is applied to all women, regardless of age.

    7. No, there's no vegetarian special on the menu. Order steak. Or you can order the Chef's Salad and pick off the 2 pounds of ham & turkey.

    8. When we fill out a table, there are three main dishes: meats, vegetables, and breads. We use three spices: salt, pepper, and Picante Sauce, so what.

    9. You bring coke into my house, it better be brown, wet, and served over ice. You bring Mary Jane into my house, she better be cute, know how to shoot, drive a truck, and have long hair.

    10. College and High School Football is as important here as the Lakers and the Knicks, and a dang site more fun to watch.

    11. Yeah, we have golf courses. But don't hit the water hazards --
    It spooks the fish.

    12. Colleges? Try Texas Tech, Texas A&M or University of Texas. They come outta there with an education plus a love for God and country, and they still wave at passing pickups when they come for the holidays.

    13. We have more folks in the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marines, than any other state, so Don't Mess with Texas, If you do, you will get whipped by the best.

    14. Always remember what our great governor Sam Houston once said:

    Texas can make it without the United States, but the United States
    Can't make it without Texas!

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Maria250's Profile Photo
    1 more image

    If you gonna play in Texas

    by Maria250 Updated Aug 10, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you're gonna play in Texas, you gotta have a fiddle in the band
    That lead guitar is hot but not for "Lousiana Man"
    So rosin up that bow for "Faded Love" and let's all dance
    If you're gonna play in Texas, you gotta have a fiddle in the band

    I remember down in Houston we were puttin' on a show
    When a cowboy in the back stood up and yelled, "Cotton-Eyed Joe"!
    He said, "We love what you're doin', boys don't get us wrong
    There's just somethin' missin' in your song"

    If you're gonna play in Texas, you gotta have a fiddle in the band
    That lead guitar is hot but not for "Lousiana Man"
    So rosin up that bow for "Faded Love" and let's all dance
    If you're gonna play in Texas, you gotta have a fiddle in the band

    So we dusted off our boots and put our cowboy hats on straight
    Them Texans raised the roof when Jeff opened up his case
    You say y'all all wanna two-step
    You say ya wanna doe-si-doe
    Well, here's your fiddlin' song before we go

    If you're gonna play in Texas, you gotta have a fiddle in the band
    That lead guitar is hot but not for "Lousiana Man"
    So rosin up that bow for "Faded Love" and let's all dance
    If you're gonna play in Texas, you gotta have a fiddle in the band

    If you're gonna play in Texas, you gotta have a fiddle in the band
    That lead guitar is hot but not for "Lousiana Man"
    So rosin up that bow for "Faded Love" and let's all dance
    If you're gonna play in Texas, you gotta have a fiddle in the band
    -Alabama

    Hey, AZ, thank you for singing along the song, and showing me around.
    You made my day.

    Related to:
    • Music

    Was this review helpful?

  • ellsasha's Profile Photo
    3 more images

    Rookery - Smith Oaks - High Island

    by ellsasha Updated Apr 16, 2010

    Smith Oaks rookery is an island in the middle of Claybottom Pond and the place where waterbirds roost and nest. Travel east from Houston on I-10, take the Winnie exit and travel approximately 20 miles south on Hwy 124. Visitors to the sanctuary are able to get a close look at these birds from the shore line trails and viewing platforms. The best time to view is the last hour before dark when the birds are coming in for the night from their marshland feeding grounds, the display is nothing short of specatular. Nesting usually starts in March and birds can be seen gathering sticks for their nests, turning their eggs, and then chick feeding and flight training. Alligators are in the surrounding waters. For a map see: http://www.houstonaudubon.org/html/HighIslandMap.pdf

    Related to:
    • Birdwatching

    Was this review helpful?

  • msbrandysue's Profile Photo

    Houston Public Library

    by msbrandysue Written Jun 22, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I love to read and I love libraries. Therefore, wherever I go I love to see the city's library!

    Houston's has a great story behind it!

    [Taken from their website]

    "As early as 1837, one year after the Battle of San Jacinto, the Philosophical Society of Texas was organized, and one of its goals was to build a library. There were other proposals to start libraries made by various groups during the early years, but finally, in 1854, the Houston Lyceum was organized, mainly through the work of a Mr. Andrew Daly.

    A lyceum's primary purpose was to bring culture to a community. Houston's Lyceum was formed with the intent of holding lectures, having discussions among members, and of most importance to us, to create a library. The present Houston Public Library can trace its history back to the founding of the Houston Lyceum in 1854.

    The members of the group went to a private homes to solicit funds and collect any books that the homeowner might wish to give them. Senator Sam Houston was one of the many who donated books to the Lyceum. Neither women nor children were members of the Lyceum. It was created solely for men.

    The first home for the Lyceum's collection was in the then Harris County Court House building. The organization got off to a good start; during the first year the Lyceum collected 88 volumes and $17.50. In September of 1854 they bought their first bookcase. During these early years, the Lyceum was totally supported by dues, subscriptions, and donations.

    Some of the early lectures that the Lyceum sponsored included "Meteorology and the Cause and Law of Storms." Debates argued topics ranging from, "Did the whole human family descend from the same parentage?" to "Are women capable of the same mental improvement as men?"

    In 1887, women were allowed to join the Lyceum as full voting members, and in 1895, it was decided that anyone living in the City could borrow materials from the collection if they paid $3.00 per year.

    An historical marker was placed outside the Julia Ideson Building in 1971 commemorating the Houston Lyceum and the Public Library. "

    Right across the street from the library you will find the former library with the historical marker in front of the building.

    Was this review helpful?

  • H-TownJourneyman's Profile Photo

    Meyer Park - Great Park, No Piñatas Allowed!

    by H-TownJourneyman Updated Jan 15, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I grew up going to Elizabeth Kaiser Meyer Park up on the Northwest side of town all of the time. It had been awhile since I was here last, and apparently there was 1, or a few pinata incidents here, which are now banned from the park. When I saw this sign I laughed for about 5 minutes! (Check out the pic!) Anyway, it's kind of a hidden park about 1 1/2 miles north of FM 1960, just west of Stuebner-Airline Rd. It is located on the banks of Cypress Creek , and also has some small but nice nature trails. There are 2 jogging paths, each about 2 1/2 miles each, and quite a few soccer and baseball fields as well. A nice liitle pond with geese and lots of playground equipment for the kids are within the park. Also it's a great place to have a picnic! If you are up around the 1960 area some weekend, stop by! But leave your pinata at home!

    Was this review helpful?

  • H-TownJourneyman's Profile Photo

    The Historic Rice Hotel Building

    by H-TownJourneyman Updated Mar 12, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sitting on the location in downtown Houston of the old capital building of the Republic of Texas, the Rice Hotel building, as well as the site location, have quite a bit of history. The site was indeed where the capital building was for the first two years of the newly formed republic, then moving to Austin. William Marsh Rice, founder of Rice University here in town, bought the building in 1883 and built a small hotel on the site. In 1913, the present 17 story structure was built, and it became one the nicest and most popular places for people to stay at, as well as enjoy entertainment. Many famous people stayed at the Rice Hotel, including many Hollywood icons and U.S. presidents. John F. Kennedy stayed at the Rice once on a visit to Houston. Then after years of gradual decline, the hotel shut it's doors in 1976. The building basically sat empty for over 20 years until in 1998 it reopened after a complete renovation as a luxury loft complex. The restoration brought back all of the beautiful architecture of it's past, while keeping the same basic structure it has had now for nearly 100 years. I really like this picture here of the Rice Hotel, as it is from a postcard from the early 1900's, shortly after it opened. If you are around the downtown area, it's worth stopping in and taking a look!

    Was this review helpful?

  • H-TownJourneyman's Profile Photo

    Houston City Hall

    by H-TownJourneyman Written Mar 12, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Located Downtown in Hermann Square at the corner of Bagby St. and Walker St. is the City Hall building. Many people visiting Houston, and many people living here for that matter, never see this 12 story building that has primarily ceremonial significance now, as many city commisions and services have relocated to other places downtown. But it remains the location where the mayor and city council conduct daily activities and meetings. Constructed of Texas limestone and opened in 1939, City Hall was one of the first buildings in Houston to be completely air conditioned, a fact that many Houstonians find incredible, with the sweltering heat the city has for most of the year. Its location in tiny Hermann Square gives it a pleasant apperance, with a large reflecting pool in front, and tall Texas oak trees around it's perimeter. A nice place to check out while downtown.

    Was this review helpful?

  • el_ruso's Profile Photo

    Mini China

    by el_ruso Written Oct 13, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There is Chinese museum with an excellent precise scale model of the Forbidden City as well as of Emperor Shi Huan Di's terracota warriors.

    To get here, take I-10 west of downtown, exit to Grand Parkway north in Katy and follow signs.

    Was this review helpful?

  • el_ruso's Profile Photo

    Stars & Wildlife - Brazos Bend State Park

    by el_ruso Updated Oct 12, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Brazos Bend State Park is a great side trip, especially if you have kids and/ or like nature! Much more fun and interesting than most if not all attractions in the Houston area.

    Besides virgin marshland and forest along Brazos where you can see typical local fauna, such as deer and racoons - all rather tame. But the main draw is its wonderful telescope - the area around is relatively free from human-made light, and the sight of stars in the sky is just overwhelming, especially if you have lived most of your life in a city. And the telescope will let you see them up close.

    TO GET HERE: follow US 59 South into Fort Bend county, and exit when you see a brown sign directing you to BRAZOS BEND STATE PARK.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • el_ruso's Profile Photo

    Seashell Museum

    by el_ruso Written Jul 26, 2005

    If you are interested in sea shells, you can take South Freeway to Gulfport, where on the grounds of the local community college there is a museum of sea shells. The collection is nothing short of impressive.

    Was this review helpful?

  • el_ruso's Profile Photo

    Morgan's Point

    by el_ruso Written Jul 26, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This neighborhood just south of ship channel where it enters the Galveston Bay was originally developed as a resort, but the growing industry next door did not allow it fully develop. Still you can see the White House replica built by a retired Washington politician, as well as several other fine homes and beautiful views of the Bay.

    Was this review helpful?

  • topmarmot's Profile Photo

    When You're Not at the Top of the Food Chain......

    by topmarmot Written Sep 8, 2004

    I wasn't sure where to put this tip, because Brazos Bend State park is a destination in its own right.

    It's about an hour from Houston to the park. Their website shows you how to get there. The fee is $3 per day per adult.

    There are a bunch of birds, particularly waders, and several good hikes, but the main attraction for me is the alligator experience. Best to go when it's warm and the gators are most active. Take some kids for bait (just kidding). Last time we were there we saw mostly small ones, maybe a year or two old, but in the past we have seen some real monsters right on the path. Look for what appear to be old tires floating in the water.

    Last visit we watch a cottonmouth snake hunting. Scary stuff.

    The photo is a little gator, sorry it's not too sharp, I was not going to bust my way through the giant spider webs to get any closer.

    Also in the park is the George Observatory for you star gazers. And lots of tables with grills for picnics.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • el_ruso's Profile Photo
    1 more image

    Oriental temples

    by el_ruso Written Nov 1, 2005

    Houston has a colossal Asian population, and it has several exotic and elaborate oriental temples, mostly in southwestern suburbs.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • el_ruso's Profile Photo

    Clear Lake

    by el_ruso Written Jul 26, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is more of a gulf than lake. It is located in the NASA area. It is full of recreational boatas and watercraft.

    Was this review helpful?

Houston Hotels

See all 408 Hotels in Houston

Latest Houston Hotel Reviews

Crowne Plaza Hotel Houston/I-10 West
127 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 16, 2014
La Quinta I-45 North
46 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Feb 20, 2014
Jesse H. Jones Rotary House International
66 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Mar 30, 2014
Hampton Inn Houston-I-10 West
88 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 17, 2014
JW Marriott on Westheimer by the Galleria
359 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 8, 2014
Holiday Inn Express Houston Beltway 8
142 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 6, 2014
Hotel Derek
222 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 17, 2014
Marriott Houston Medical Center
226 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 7, 2014
The St. Regis Houston
324 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 16, 2014
Westin Galleria Houston
496 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 16, 2014
Hyatt North Houston
198 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 16, 2014
Regency Inn & Suites I-10
4 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Nov 28, 2009
Hilton Houston North
390 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 17, 2014
Homewood Suites By Hilton' Houston Beltway 8, TX
120 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 14, 2014

Instant Answers: Houston

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

81 travelers online now

Comments

Houston Off The Beaten Path

Travel tips and advice posted by real travelers and Houston locals.
Map of Houston