Local traditions and culture in Texas

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Most Viewed Local Customs in Texas

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    MILITARY PARADES

    by mtncorg Written Jun 5, 2008

    With so many military units in Texas, parades are a common sight. The vast Parade Ground at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio - jog around the whole thing and you have done five miles! - is the perfect venue to hold and practice these maneuvers. It was on these grounds that my Army marching career took place - both hour-long sessions. The Medical Corps is a breed unto itself! ;-]

    Army Medical band marches in review at Ft Sam Medical troops review on Parade Ground, Ft Sam
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    BAT TOURS

    by mtncorg Written Jun 5, 2008

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    If you cannot get out to Carlsbad Caverns, then the Old Tunnel near Fredericksburg is a nice option. With over five millions bats in residence during August, the outpouring swarms at sunset are quite a sight. Times of the mass exodus and swarm duration are posted next to the upper observation area. Seats are to be found in both the upper and lower observation areas - a smaller scale of what is to be found at Carlsbad. The lower area is limited to the first 70 people who show up and there is a $5 charge - no charge for the upper area.

    Sign describing next bat viewing opportunity The Old Tunnel near Fredericksburg The ways to see the bats at the Old Tunnel Bat viewing etiquette described
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    Dry Counties

    by bocmaxima Written Apr 24, 2007

    Texas is one of several states in the country to incorporate "Dry Counties." This entails a county limiting the sale of alcoholic beverages. However, the laws are very inconsistent and will often vary from town to town, thus becoming pretty confusing.
    If you're planning on visiting a city or town in Texas aside from the larger ones (San Antonio, Austin, Houston, Dallas, etc.), it may be helpful to research the city and county's laws regarding alcohol sales if you're planning on hitting the nightlife. For instance, Lubbock is considered "dry" although beer and wine are sold in the City of Lubbock. Abilene and San Angelo have similar laws. In many cities, restaurants of a certain size are allowed to sell liquor (not just beer and wine), although this, again, varies from county to county and city to city.

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    The Six Flags Of Texas

    by H-TownJourneyman Updated Feb 21, 2007

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    When visiting Texas, one thing you will see in mass, and in many cases large sizes, is the state flag of Texas. In most countries around the world, let alone other states in America, you will not see half of the amount of national or state flags that you will in Texas. Even I, a native Texan, am kind of amazed at times how often I see the flag flying overhead at places of business, institutions, and residences. But many people outside of Texas are not aware of the many other flags that have flown within the state's present boundaries throughout history. Including the present state flag, which was also the flag of the Republic of Texas, 6 nations have raised their flags in Texas -

    The first was Spain, who controlled parts of Texas from the 16th century until the 19th century.

    In 1685, French sailor & explorer René-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle established a colony near the Texas coast. The colony only lasted 5 years following the murder of La Salle at the hands of his crewmen.

    After Mexico gained it's independence from Spain in 1821, the new nation controlled most of present-day Texas until 1836.

    The Republic of Texas raised it's flag after declaring independence from Mexico in 1836, following Texas' win at the Battle of San Jacinto.

    Texas sided with the Conferderate States of America during the American Civil War, seceding from the Union in 1861, and rejoining the United States after the Confederate loss in 1865.

    The United States of America first flew it's flag over Texas in 1845, when the Republic of Texas joined as the 28th state. After the brief 4 year period under the Confederate States, the American flag once again was raised over Texas in 1865.

    The Six Flags Of Texas
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    "Don't Mess With Texas"

    by H-TownJourneyman Updated Feb 21, 2007

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    "Don't Mess With texas", a popular phrase in the Lone Star state, actually began as an anti-litter campaign slogan in the 1980's. It has been a very effective campaign, with many Texas celebrities such as Willie Nelson and Lance Armstrong appearing in television advertisements promoting garbage-free Texas highways and wilderness areas. The slogan has been unofficially adopted by many other artists, organizations, and institutions from or within Texas, and you are quite likely to see a "Don't Mess With Texas" banner or bumper sticker in every square mile of the state you visit.

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    The word "Ya'll"

    by H-TownJourneyman Updated Feb 12, 2006

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    If you have ever been to Texas, or any southern state for that matter, no doubt you would have heard a local using the word "ya'll" when they are talking directly to a group of people. In Texas though, it might as well be a word in a dictionary of proper English. Most people from other parts of the country do not use ya'll, instead using the more proper "you all", or even "you guys". And when I have traveled to other parts of the United States, using the word ya'll often draws a reaction from people. They automatically what part of the country I am from. So if you are coming to Texas, I have just given you your first lesson in the Texan language!

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    Texas Barbeque

    by H-TownJourneyman Written Feb 12, 2006

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    Barbequed meats are enjoyed by people all over the world. And many different places have their own individual styles and recipes for BBQ which makes it unique. Texas is no different. BBQ is one of the most popular types of food here, done with a Texan flair of course! I think what is the main difference between BBQ here and in other places is the sauces that are used here, which tend to be very thick and rich, and often with a bit of spice. There are BBQ restaurants all over Texas, but the best BBQ is to be had in ones own backyard, using your own grill. If you have a chance to attend a BBQ, or even try out a BBQ restaurant while here, I would highly recommend it!

    I Think They're Done!

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    Tex-Mex Food

    by H-TownJourneyman Written Feb 12, 2006

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    Enchiladas, Tamales, Flautas.........ok, now I am hungry! Tex-Mex food is an absolute fixture in Texas. In fact, it should be a rule of some sort, that when you come to Texas, you must eat Tex-Mex at least once a week! :) Well, maybe not, but there are very few people here that do not enjoy a good Tex-Mex meal. All over the state, there are thousands upon thousands of Mexican restaurants and taquerias that cater to the millions of hungry Texans craving it. And now whenever I travel, wherever in the world it may be, there is usually a restaurant that serves Tex-Mex food. More often than not, unfortunately it is just not up to par with the food back home. It is definately one of my favorites, but of course I am biased. A must-eat when in Texas!!!

    Mmmmmmmm!
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    It's true!

    by xxgirasolexx Written Aug 26, 2005

    People often say that Texans like trucks....and it's true! They can be useful as farm vehicles, hauling stuff around...and so on... Anyway, you can even find special truck washes here as opposed to a car wash...hehehe

    No car wash here! Just trucks!
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    Texas proud

    by kyoub Written Jan 31, 2005

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    Bluebonnets in Texas are a major Spring attraction. They grow along many state highways, and are truly spectacular. Bluebonnets typically bloom until the end of May when temperatures get warm. They tend to peak in mid-April.

    Blooming along with the bluebonnets are Indian paintbrush, Indian blanket and coreopsis.

    Texas Bluebonnet is the state flower of Texas

    The bluebonnet is to Texas what the shamrock is to Ireland, the cherry blossom to Japan, the lily to France, the rose to England and the tulip to Holland.
    (Historian Jack Maguire)

    Bluebonnet
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    What to do

    by kyoub Written Jan 31, 2005

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    When stung by a jellyfish, a paste of rubbing alcohol and unseasoned meat tenderizer is recommended. The tenderizer works with the body’s natural proteins to break down the injected poison. As gross and unprofessional as it sounds, human urine also works instantaneously.

    Jellyfish
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    Texas Pride

    by Astrobuck Written Dec 18, 2004

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    When in Texas, you will see t-shirts, signs, etc. that say "Don't mess with Texas." This can be interpreted in 2 ways: Littering (which is what the State wants you not to do); and Texas pride.

    Texans are VERY proud of their state! Why? I don't know. But the culture and laws there almost make you feel like you are in another country. Try your best not to criticize or make fun. This is a VERY sensitive issue, especially to native Texans!

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    ARE YOU READY FOR SOME FOOTBALL!?!?!

    by tejanasueca Updated Oct 8, 2004

    Texas is probably the most football crazy state in all of the US. Essentially, competitive football is played on three levels: High School, College, and Professional.

    High School (Friday)
    In Texas, there are high school games that are attended by more than 20.000 people, and in the smaller towns; friday night high school football is the most talked about event of the week (for a reference, watch the movies "Varsity Blues," or "Friday Night Lights").

    College (Saturday)
    When it comes to the college level, there are two teams that really matter (even though there are over a dussin smaller teams): University of Texas and Texas A&M. If you live in Texas, you have to pick one of these teams as your favorite team, and with that goes that you always want the other team to lose, no matter who they play.

    Pro (Sunday)
    When it comes to professional football, there are two teams: Dallas Cowboys and Houston Texans. The Texans is a rather new team (the Tennesse Oilers used to be based in Houston), while the Cowboys have been around for a while. The Cowboys had great success in the 90s and is often called "America's Team" because of all of the fans the team has around the US. Due to the fact that the Texans is a new team, the rivalry between the Texans and the Cowboys is not close to as strong as the one between the University of Texas and Texas A&M.

    Why should you care?
    Even if you are not into football, it can be a good thing to keep track of when the big games are as it affects the traffic. For example, when the annual game between University of Texas and University of Oklahoma is played in Dallas, it seems like half of Oklahoma migrate south on Interstate 35 and completly block it up!

    My favorite teams
    So, now that you know that every Texan pick their favorite team in each category, you might wonder what my picks are. Well, here they are:

    High School: Denton Ryan High School
    College: Texas A&M
    Pro: Dallas Cowboys

    Kansas State v. Texas A&M, October 2, 2004
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    Possum on the Half Shell

    by keeweechic Written May 11, 2004

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    This reference is made to a 'mowed down' armadillo. A common site on the country roads in Texas. Also known as a Texas Speed Bump. It seems that even if a car can go over them, they will sometimes instinctively jump up into the air at the instant a vehicle passes over them.

    The Armadillo first originated in South and Central America and is related to anteaters and sloths. The Armadillos travelled to Texas through Mexico and stayed because of the moderate climate which became essential for their survival. Armadillos don’t hibernate and cannot survive long periods of cold weather. Apparently they are one of the few animals that eat fire ants without any repercussions from the bites/stings.

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    Texas Facts

    by keeweechic Updated Mar 28, 2004

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    * The State Capitol in Austin stands largest among all the states.

    * The San Jacinto Monument near Houston is among the tallest columns in the world; at 570 feet, its about twenty feet higher than the Washington Monument in the District of Columbia.

    * Texas has more counties (254) than any other state. Forty-one counties in Texas are each larger than the state of Rhode Island.

    * Of the nation's ten largest cities, three are in Texas (Houston, Dallas, and San Antonio).

    * Texas is the nation's leading producer of oil, natural gas, beef, sheep, goats, wool, cotton, rice...and, oh yes, watermelons.

    * Today, approximately 18 million people live in Texas, only slightly outnumbering its 15 million cattle. Texas today is also home for about 2.5 million deer and 200,000 alligators.

    * The land area of Texas is larger than all of New England, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio and Illinois combined. It extends 801 miles from north to south and 773 miles from east to west.

    * The Dallas/Ft. Worth airport is larger than New York City's Manhattan Island. DFW Airport also has the worlds largest parking lot.

    * El Paso, Texas is closer to Los Angeles on the Pacific Coast than it is to Port Arthur on Gulf Coast of Texas. Port Arthur, on the other hand, is closer to Jacksonville, Florida on the Atlantic Coast than it is to El Paso.

    * Texas has the largest road system of any state; whether measured by 77,000
    center line miles or by 184,000 lane miles.

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