Alamo, San Antonio

4.5 out of 5 stars 87 Reviews

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    The Alamo
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    The Alamo
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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Alamo Plaza and the Alamo Cenotaph

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Apr 28, 2008

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    Located in Alamo Plaza, the small park between the Alamo and Alamo Street is the Alamo Cenotaph...(how many Alamos can you squeeze into a single coherent sentence?). Little did I know when I visited, the Cenotaph was created way back in 1939. Greek for "empty tomb," the Cenotaph stands where many believe the surviving Alamo defenders were killed and burned. It is engraved with the names of those who died here and has carvings of many of the more famous defenders such as Crockett and Bowie. The sculptor, Italian Pompeo Coppini, also has other carvings in the city.

    The Cenotaph stands at the northern end of the Alamo Plaza. This plaza is the heart of the city's history and entertainment areas, siting in the center of the Riverwalk, Rivercenter Mall, the Spurs Arena, the Alamo of course, and numerous other historic buildings in downtown San Antonio.

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  • 807Wheaton's Profile Photo

    Visit The Alamo early in the morning

    by 807Wheaton Updated Apr 26, 2008

    The city bus cost $1 for a ride to the stop by the Alamo. We arrived early in the morning and found very few people there. We enjoyed the outside gardens tremendously and also listened to a historical story by a guide about the events that happened here in 1836. There is a good movie to view for no charge before starting the inside visit.
    Originally a mission, San Antonio de Velaro later became known as The Alamo. It was originally constructed as the first of five missions in the San Antonio area.
    There is no charge for admission at The Alamo or the other four missions.
    We spent over 2 hours here so don't be in a hurry when you visit.

    Gardens at the Alamo Gardens at the Alamo Gardens at the Alamo Gardens outside The Alamo The Alamo
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  • Tdawg40sw's Profile Photo

    The Alamo

    by Tdawg40sw Written Apr 17, 2008

    I have to say I am glad I got to see the Alamo, but after years of conditioning of countless Alamo movies I have to say it was not what I was expecting. I did not expect urbanization to have encroached up to the walls of the Alamo. I always kinda expected to have at least a little space between the walls and the city. That is really the only thing I was disappointed in, but then again, when is anything like what you see in the movies. I still recommend seeing the Alamo if you have the chance.

    The Alamo Inside the Alamo Inside the Alamo
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    The Alamo history

    by GUYON Updated Apr 12, 2008

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    Regularly, a volunteer of the visitors bureau tells the story of the Battle. He glorifies the role of each protagonist and finishes with a note of glory. Very moving.

    I did not shoot indoor pictures in the Alamo because it was prohibited and even I am an unruly Frenchman I did not dare to take one.

    Nearby, in the RiverCenter, the Imax proposes a re-enactment film (45 min) for 8$. at 9AM, 11AM, 1PM, 3PM, 5PM, 7PM.

    I have recorded the 2 films about Alamo : the one of John Wayne which is far from the truth and the more recent one (2004) which fits better with history .

    Alamo Plaza
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  • klj&a's Profile Photo

    The Alamo

    by klj&a Written Mar 15, 2008

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    Truthfully at first glance my first impression was, "Is that it?" I was picturing a huge fortress. The fact that it is a part of this country's history makes it a must see. It's free and has various actors dressed in the period walking about. You just need about 30 minutes at the most.

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  • doug48's Profile Photo

    burial site of the battle of the alamo

    by doug48 Updated Mar 9, 2008

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    pictured is a plaque on the burial site of the texans killed at the battle of the alamo. since there were so many killed they were cremated on this spot and their ashes buried. this historic spot is located on the south side of commerce street between alamo and bowie streets across from the rivercenter mall. of the millions of visitors to the alamo only a handful of people see this obscure site.

    alamo burial site
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    the alamo

    by doug48 Updated Mar 9, 2008

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    the alamo is the most famous and most visited site in san antonio. the alamo (san antonio de valero mission) was built by the spanish in 1744. the sanctuary and adjacent buildings served as a school for indians and for their conversion to christianity. the alamo was abandoned by the spanish in 1793 and it became a fortress. the alamo became world famous in 1836 as the site of the battle of the alamo between the republic of texas and mexico. admission is free.

    the alamo
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  • msbrandysue's Profile Photo

    Nothing makes Texans more proud....

    by msbrandysue Updated Jan 20, 2008

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    Visiting the Alamo is a very special thing for Texans. I went when I was a child but nothing ever meant more than after I had just taught the lesson to my second grade class. To stand in a room where women and children were kept during the battle, or to look at the clothes Davey Crockett wore the week he gave his life for my state, it just brings many realizations to you.

    The Alamo is a wonderful piece of heroic history. Although we lost we will never forget the men who gave their life for our state. In the words of Sam Houston, "REMEMBER THE ALAMO!!!"

    PS....There's a WONDERFUL gift shop!!!

    Yes, I took that :) Me at the Alamo Letter of the Alamo THE LINE! Monument across the street

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  • VeronicaG's Profile Photo

    A Monument To Heroes

    by VeronicaG Updated Jan 9, 2008

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    As you walk towards the Alamo, you'll see a looming monument outside its doors. It was designed by architects Adams and Adams and executed by sculptor, Pompeo Coppini. It was commissioned by the Texas Centennial Commission and presented (1939) as a memorial to those men who lost their lives in the Battle of Alamo.

    This sculpture is referred to as the Alamo Cenotaph and contains all the names of those who died. A cenotaph is erected to honor a person or persons whose remains are elsewhere or unknown.

    The base of the monument is 12' x 40' and comprised of Texas pink granite, while the sculpture itself is of gray Georgian marble and rises 60 feet. The theme of the piece is "Spirit of Sacrifice" and depicts a figure rising from the grave. Beneath this figure, heroes of the Alamo and of Texas encircle the monument.

    See picture #2 for a more detailed look of the Texas heroes.

    In Honor Of Those Who Died at the Alamo Detailed Closeup of the Alamo Memorial
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  • VeronicaG's Profile Photo

    Tour The Alamo

    by VeronicaG Updated Jan 9, 2008

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    We were in our glory to finally be able to see The Alamo. The Mision San Antonio de Valero (1718)--later known as the Alamo-- was the first of five missions constructed in the early 1700's in an area first claimed by Spain. The mission was home to Spanish missionaries and their Native Indian converts for twenty years, then later used by a Spanish calvary unit in the early 1800's.

    Today the Alamo comprises a little over four acres and is the top tourist attraction in Texas. Thousands flock here each year to see where a small number of Texian and Tejano's held out for thirteen days against an overwhelming force of Mexican soldiers led by General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna.

    From what I've read, the Texas Revolution began when the government reneged on an agreement allowing settlers from outside this territory to occupy the land. Efforts were made to push them out and the settlers rebelled. Ben Milam in 1835 led Texian and Tejano volunteers against Mexican troops stationed in San Antonio. After searching the town and fighting house to house, General Martin Perfecto de Cos and his soldiers were forced to surrender.

    This defeat could not be tolerated, so in 1836 Santa Anna surprised the patriots at the Alamo. Commander William Travis pleaded for help to the surrounding communities of Texas, but only 32 volunteers from Gonzales arrived--bringing the total force to less than 200.

    The thirteen day siege ended in a massacre of the Texian and Tejano holdouts. Santa Anna eventually was defeated himself in April 1836.

    There is no charge for admission. Hours are Mon.-Sat. 9am-5:30 pm; Sun. 10am-5:30 pm. Open daily except on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. A large gift shop has many souvenirs plus a postage machine for your postcards--you can mail your cards/letters and have them postmarked from the ALAMO.

    The Alamo Pretty Archways Original Well A Respite From The Sun Alamo Gift Shop
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  • dtimoske's Profile Photo

    Visit the Alamo but don't spend too much time here

    by dtimoske Written Jan 1, 2008

    Sure, you've got to visit the Alamo because it's where Davy Crockett fought against the Mexican Army under General Santa Anna. This is a must stop and a great place to take a photo, but many tourists are disappointed by the Alamo. There's a museum inside, but you really only need about 30 minutes to take in the experience.

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  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    Such a history

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Dec 18, 2007

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    It's such a little building to be carrying the weight of so much history. Millions come here every year to see the place that to many is the very embodiment of heroism and sacrifice in the name of freedom and liberty.

    The old stone church and the few simple buildings that make up the national shrine that is The Alamo are surrounded nowadays by beautifully tended and peaceful gardens but that wasn't the way it was back in March 1836 when a small band of men held out there against the army of General Antonio López de Santa Anna during the war that was raging between the Texians and Mexico. After 13 days which saw the death of all those defending the fort (including the small church which saw much fierce fighting) , the Alamo finally fell on March 6. The battle was lost but a legend was born that day that saw the names of the men who fell pass into the list of national heroes and the rallying cry of Sam Houston as he led the Texan Army to ultimate victory become a rallying cry for a whole nation - Remember the Alamo!

    300 years of history are present in the Alamo. First a Spanish Mission (San Antonio de Valero, founded in 1718), until ownership was handed over to the mission converts, the mission buildings became a military barracks in 1803 - initially in the hands of the Mexicans, and then being taken by the men of the Texan Army who were to defend it to the death in the Texas Revolution as they fought for independence from Mexico.

    Two of the original buildings are still standing - the church (now called the Shrine) and the Long Barrack (originally the "Convento") - both house exhibits and items from the siege and Texan history. There are more historical exhibits in another, much newer building also, as well as markers and the Wall of History in the garden. Alamo Plaza itself approximates the area covered by the old mission and the fort.

    A national shrine
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  • deeper_blue's Profile Photo

    History lesson

    by deeper_blue Written May 9, 2007

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    San Antonio was the setting for the one of the greatest stands in American battlefield history. A huge Mexican army was halted by Davey Crockett and a modest collection of men.
    You can see the church which stands as a shrine and visit the museum.

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  • shargurl's Profile Photo

    The Alamo

    by shargurl Written Apr 15, 2007

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    The Alamo is a great spot to visit while in San Antonio. It is probably the most visited spot in Texas. Step inside the sanctuary and you will be transported to a different time, a time where battles were fought for freedom.

    San Antonio can be very hot and humid, so if you aren't from the area (local Texans are used to this), come and visit during the winter months or early spring. There isn't any air conditioning and the heat can be swealtering.

    Alamo at night The Alamo Read all about Alamo History
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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    The Alamo

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Mar 24, 2007

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    Completed in 1724, the Alamo was originally a mission, but in 1836 it gained fame as the site of the famous battle between Santa Anna's Mexicans and the Texas Revolutionaries led by William B. Travis, Davie Crockett, and Jim Bowie. After a 13-day siege, Santa Anna's army attacked on 6 March 1836 and overwhelmed the invaders, killing most of the heroic men fighting for liberty and independence.

    Just 6 weeks later General Sam Houston defeated Santa Anna's forces at San Jacinto, capturing Santa Anna the next day and establishing Texas independence. Houston's forces were motivated by the cry "Remember the Alamo!"

    Only 2 buildings on the compound today are originals: the church or shrine and the long barracks. The shrine is the signature image of the Alamo. It was begun in 1744, but poor workmanship led to it never being completed and it fell into ruin. This building was in poor condition during the Battle of the Alamo, but in 1850 it was rebuilt giving it the current look.

    The Long Barracks were constructed from 1724 to 1744. It was used by merchants in the late 1800s and restored to the original condition in the 1960s.

    Many of the other buildings on the site were completed in the early 1900s.

    Night in front of the main Alamo building, Jun 06 Nice, sunny day at The Alamo, Jun 2006 The Alamo from the Riverwalk, Jun 2006 The Alamo from the Riverwalk at night, Jun 2006 The Alamo Memorial
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