Fun things to do in San Antonio

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Most Viewed Things to Do in San Antonio

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    Art Downtown

    by Basaic Written Jul 19, 2013

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    There are a few sculptures and murals in the downtown area; most are historical. I admit I usually like art that I can tell what it is without having to look at the signs but this massive, colorful piece of art was impressive.

    Art
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    Historic Districts and Buildings

    by Basaic Written Jul 19, 2013

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    There are many buildings in San Antonio that are of historical and/or architectural interest, including about 130 listed on the National Register of Historic Places. This is the old U. S. Post Office and Courthouse which is one of them.

    U. S. Post Office and Courthouse
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    St John's Lutheran Church

    by Basaic Written Jul 19, 2013

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    The St John's Lutheran Church was organized in 1857 mostly by German settlers and the first church building was started in 1860 but the Civil War postponed completion until 1875. Upon completion, the tower was topped by a gilded rooster weathervane, earning the church the nickname "The Rooster Church". The original church was torn down in 1927 due to a plan to widen the street and the current building was completed in 1932, to coincide with the 75th anniversary of the congregation.

    St John's Lutheran Church
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    Plaza de Armas

    by Basaic Written Jul 19, 2013

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    Spaniards explored this area in 1691. In 1722, the Presidio of Bexar moved here and the Plaza de Armas (Military Plaza) was enclosed by adobe fortifications on three sides and became a place of military and governmental importance. During the Republic of Texas era (1836 to 1845) the role of the plaza changed away from the military but the plaza became a busy and important part of the city. Markets and festivals were held here on a frequent basis and the plaza is still in many ways the heart of the city.

    Plaza de Armas and San Fernando Cathedral
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    Hill 881 South - Vietnam Veterans Memorial

    by bpwarne Updated Dec 2, 2012

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    San Antonio's Vietnam Veterans Memorial, dedicated Nov. 9, 1986. The memorial depicts a radio operator comforting a wounded soldier and while anxiously watching the sky for a medevac helicopter.History of the Memorial states that on On April 30, 1967, the dramatic sight of radioman Donald Hassock helping an injured soldier inspired artist Austin Deuel, a Marine illustrator during the war, to draw the picture that later would become the model for San Antonio's memorial.
    I am a bit confused about this. As I recollect there is a photograph, not a drawing, in the book 'The Hill Fights' by Edward Murphy of the radioman attending a fatally injured comrade which was the original inspiration for the Memorial. In any event, The Hill Fights recounts the actual battle for Hill 881 and is a great read for military history buffs. A short bypass to the Memorial is a worthwhile walk if you are in San Antonio to visit The Alamo or The Riverwalk.

    At the base of the Hill 881 South memorial is this poem by a Hill 881 veteran:

    "Death at My Door"

    Day is over and danger hastens
    Young Marines at their battle stations
    Instruments of war outline the sky
    Means of death are standing by
    Can it be true on this high hill
    Forces will clash only to kill?
    Silence fills the near moonless night
    Restless thoughts of a bloody fight
    Endless memories for those awake
    Meaningful discussions experience would make
    Though silent world in which we live
    Permit only God's comfort to give
    Somewhere through the darkness creeping
    A date with death is in the keeping
    Alone I sit and question why
    Life itself to be born to merely die?

    David Rogers
    1st Lt USMC
    April 30, 1967
    Hill 881 South Republic of Vietnam

    Hill 881 South - Vietnam  Veterans Memorial Hill 881 South - Vietnam  Veterans Memorial
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    Segscursion

    by DEBBBEDB Updated Apr 30, 2012

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    We've been doing Segway excursions with our son, but our daughter had never done one as we thought she was too young. But on this visit to San Antonio we did a Segway tour and our daughter is hooked and wants one. The Ultimate tour visited the Alamo, the Main Plaza and The Riverwalk and was $75 (9-2). The Executive Tour didn't ride the Riverwalk and was $65 for two hours four times a day 9am, 1pm, 4pm & 6pm

    We could have done the Private Tour which would stop where we wanted to stop and go where we wanted to go. But that was 10:30 to 2:30 and was $120 each.

    Lined up outside the office Alamo Jim Plaza our daughter
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    San Antonio Missions National Historical Park II

    by Maria250 Updated Aug 18, 2011

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    The chain of missions established along the San Antonio River in the 18th century are reminders of one of Spain’s most successful attempts to extend its New World dominion from Mexico. Representing both church and state, these missions were charged with converting the local Native Americans, collectively called Coahuiltecans, into devout Catholics and productive members of Spanish society. More than just churches on the Spanish Colonial frontier, the missions also served as vocational and educational centers, economic enterprises involved in agricultural and ranching endeavors and regional trade. They were the greatest concentration of Catholic missions in North America and formed the foundation for what is today the thriving city of San Antonio. The park contains the historically and architecturally significant structures of Missions Concepcion, San Jose, San Juan and Espada. Other important cultural resources included are the historic Espada Dam and Aqueduct, acequia (irrigation) systems and the Rancho de las Cabras. Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. daily. Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s. Admission: Free. The visitor center is located next to Mission San Jose and contains a theater showing a 20-minute depiction of early life at the mission, a museum and book shop.

    Park Headquarters:
    2202 Roosevelt Ave.
    San Antonio
    Texas, 78210
    ph: 210-534-8833

    Visitor Center:
    6701 San Jose Dr.
    Texas, 78214
    ph: 210-932-1001

    San Antonio Mission San Antonio Mission San Antonio Mission San Antonio Mission San Antonio Mission
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    San Antonio Missions National Historical Park I

    by Maria250 Updated Aug 18, 2011

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    The chain of missions established along the San Antonio River in the 18th century are reminders of one of Spain’s most successful attempts to extend its New World dominion from Mexico. Representing both church and state, these missions were charged with converting the local Native Americans, collectively called Coahuiltecans, into devout Catholics and productive members of Spanish society. More than just churches on the Spanish Colonial frontier, the missions also served as vocational and educational centers, economic enterprises involved in agricultural and ranching endeavors and regional trade. They were the greatest concentration of Catholic missions in North America and formed the foundation for what is today the thriving city of San Antonio. The park contains the historically and architecturally significant structures of Missions Concepcion, San Jose, San Juan and Espada. Other important cultural resources included are the historic Espada Dam and Aqueduct, acequia (irrigation) systems and the Rancho de las Cabras. Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. daily. Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s. Admission: Free. The visitor center is located next to Mission San Jose and contains a theater showing a 20-minute depiction of early life at the mission, a museum and book shop.

    Park Headquarters:
    2202 Roosevelt Ave.
    San Antonio
    Texas, 78210
    ph: 210-534-8833

    Visitor Center:
    6701 San Jose Dr.
    Texas, 78214
    ph: 210-932-1001

    San Antonio Mission San Antonio Mission San Antonio Mission San Antonio Mission One room house for one family
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    CAVALRY/ARTILLERY POST

    by mtncorg Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The buildings built along the south side of the Parade Grounds, surrounding the Fort Sam Houston museum, date back to the 1905-12 time period when the Fort became the largest post in the US Army. Old barracks buildings have been converted into offices today while much of the open spaces to the south were where the stables of the Cavalry and Artillery units posted to Fort Sam had been located.

    Old barracks of the Cavalry/Artillery Post Officer Family Quarters, Cavalry/Artillery Post Cav/Art Post exhibit at Ft Sam Museum Layout of the Cav/Art Post - Ft Sam Museum Downtown San Antonio from Cav/Art Parade Ground
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    NEW POST

    by mtncorg Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    With the entry of the US into World War I, a huge temporary camp - Camp Travis - was built just west of the Fort to train over 100,000 soldiers, including both the 18th and 90th Divisions. At war’s end, more permanent construction along the south and east sides of Stanley Road were built. Housing for officer families were built on the opposite side of the Parade Grounds.

    Eisenhower House on the New Post New Post exhibit inside Ft Sam Museum
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    STAFF POST/PERSHING HOUSE

    by mtncorg Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    High ranking officers and their families live in houses just west of the Quadrangle - an area know as Staff Post. The Pershing House is the biggest and today is home for the commander of the Fifth US Army. Built in 1881, Brigadier General John Pershing, fresh from adventures in northern Mexico chasing Pancho Villa about, sallied forth from here to France as he led the American Army into World War I.

    Monument in front of the Pershing House/Staff Row Over 10000 square feet in the Pershing House
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    STAFF POST/MITCHELL HOUSE

    by mtncorg Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This was the home to Brigadier General William 'Billy' Mitchell in 1926 just before his court martial. He was a loud proponent of air power at the time and his views were vindicated with time. He was just a little too persistent and not politically correct for the Army powers - and Navy - that were in place during the 1920's. Both the beginnings of the Army Air Corps - now the Air Force - and the Airbone Infantry occured here at Fort Sam. Another house here at Staff Post was occupied by Captain - later Major General - Bnejamin Foulois. On March 2, 1910, Foulois, using written instructions from the Wright Brothers, recorded the first Army aviation flight taking off from the Parade Grounds. His career was to be an incredible one with many 'firsts' - the stuff movies are made of.

    Billy Mitchell home on Staff Post Monument describing Army career of Billy Mitchell Ft Sam exhibit devoted to Foulois
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    STAFF POST/MACARTHUR HOUSE

    by mtncorg Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This was the home for Major Arthur MacArthur and his family. MacArthur had a long career with the US Army stretching back from the Civil War where he gained fame as the 'Boy Colonel' - at age 19, he was made a brevet colonel and would also eventually be awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions on Missionary Ridge in 1863. His son, Douglas, would earn another Medal of Honor for his actions in the Philippines in 1941-42, thus becoming only the second father and son Medal of Honor winners - the other two are Theodore Roosevelt for his actions in the Spanish American War and his son, Theodore Roosevelt, Jr, who won his medal in World War II.

    During the MacArthur family stay here at Fort Sam - 1893-97 - Douglas attended the nearby West Texas Military Institute, which is today the Texas Military Institute. He would go on to West Point in 1898 embarking upon his own very remarkable military career which would end finally with Korea and President Harry Truman in 1951.

    The MacArthur House at Staff Post, Ft Sam Monument describing Arthur Macarthur's career
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    NEW POST/DWIGHT EISENHOWER HOUSE

    by mtncorg Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Dwight Eisenhower and his family lived in this home on the New Post in 1941. Eisenhower came here as a Colonel and left as a Brigadier General - just before he would head to Europe and much greater challenges. He had served at Fort Sam earlier in his career, living as a bachelor officer and during that tour he could claim graduating from the Baker and Cooks School as one of his many accomplishments. It was also on that tour of duty that Ike met his wife, Mamie.

    Former home of Dwight and Mamie Eisenhower Graceful architecture of New Post, Eisenhower home Monument to the Man - Dwight D. Eisenhower
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    CAVALRY ARTILLERY POST/PAT'S GRAVE

    by mtncorg Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Horses used to be in great demand in the Army, especially here at Fort Sam where there were both artillery and cavalry units. As time went on, however, the combustion engine replaced the horse and mule and the horses were left behind. Fort Sam still has a few horses that you can see grazing in fields on the extreme southwestern areas of the fort. The fort boasts one of only two full-time caisson units in the Army - the other is the Old Guard at Fort Myers involved with funerals at Arlington. Caissons used to go forward filled with ammunition for artillery guns. The horses would pull empty caissons back that were used to convey the dead and wounded. The symbolism has prevailed and caissons are used today for military funerals.
    Pat was a mount of one of the Artillery units that were told to turn in their horses during the late 1930's. Pat must have been a very popular horse for his handlers managed to petition the Pentagon for the right to have Pat 'retire' on post here where after he lived to the ripe age of 45. His horseshoes are buried at the front of the grave, which is rather large, but then he was a horse.

    The oversized grave of Pat the caisson horse Headstone for Pat
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