Spanish Governor's Palace, San Antonio

4 out of 5 stars 14 Reviews

105 Military Plaza$1.50

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  • Spanish Governor's Palace
    Spanish Governor's Palace
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    Statue of Spanish Governor
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    See Some Colonial History

    by Basaic Written Jul 16, 2013

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    This impressive building is the 10-room Spanish Governor's Palace. In 1772, San Antonio was made the seat of the Spanish Government in Texas and the government was run out of this building. This is also where Moses Austin came to ask permission to settle a colony of U.S. Citizens in Spanish Texas. This was the beginning of the settlement of Texas by the United States and led to the eventual formation of the Republic of Texas. Hours are 9 AM to 5 PM Monday through Saturday and 10 AM to 5 PM on Sunday. Admission is $4 for adults; $3 for military and seniors, and $2 for kids 7 to 13.

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  • Haunted Spanish Governor's Palace

    by jd56 Written Oct 14, 2009

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    Tour the non-descript SGP, if you dare. This very simple structure is clearly a haven for ghosts, such as the little girl who was ditched in the bottom of the well. Her bedroom is the last one in the line of bedrooms. She plays in the courtyard. She taps other children on the shoulder. She did to my small boy. It is a timeless environment, that which you enter. The courtyard is the domain of the spirits who lived and died at the foot of the hanging tree. This is a quick tour, but can be creepy.

    Also, watch the lights at night. Are they on or are they off? Don't look in the building after dark!

    The lady at the desk had mysterious thing to say, too.

    Watch out for those desperados.

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    Spanish Governor's Palace

    by spgood301 Written Dec 26, 2008

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    The Spanish Governor's Palace, San Antonio

    I found this to be one of the most interesting places in San Antonio. The Spanish Governor's Palace dates back to the early 18th century, one of the oldest structures in the city. It eventually became the seat of power in Texas as the capitol building of the then-Spanish territory. The colonial governor lived here too. He ran the territory, raised his family and entertained dignitaries, all from here.

    It's actually a very small building for a palace. It's a one-story building, next to the current city hall, built in Spanish Colonial style. Admission is only $2 - one of the best bargains in San Antonio. You walk the grounds yourself; no guided tours, but there are several displays on how the Spanish governors worked and lived in this fascinating era. Also check out the historical artifacts; some are several centuries old. Everything's in this one small building: living quarters for the entire family, a governing chamber, a ballroom, and a big back yard. It's everything an 18th century colonial governor and his family could ever want!

    The Spanish Governor's Palace is a great place to go back in time, to colonial Texas, and see how people lived. You need not spend more than an hour here...I really enjoyed my visit.

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    spanish governor's palace

    by doug48 Written Mar 9, 2008

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    spanish governor's palace

    the spanish governor's palace dates back to 1722 and is the last remaining example of an aristocratic spanish house in texas. in 1772 the palace was the governmental seat of the province of spanish tejas (texas). a very worth while place to visit when in downtown san antonio. admission $2.00.

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    The Spanish Governors Palace

    by VeronicaG Updated Jan 9, 2008

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    This is not what one thinks of as a typical palace, but Texas was a wild and rustic country in 1749 when this building was constructed. Those who lived here were officials of Spanish Texas and used this as living and working quarters.

    For a small donation, you can see how those of import lived. One of the first rooms you'll see was used as an office and sometimes bedroom of the governor. It could be accessed from the street when used for official business. When Moses Austin (see next tip) petitioned the governor to bring families to Texas, he came to this office.

    Two additional bedrooms used by the family, were outfitted with the massive Spanish style furniture so identified with that culture (picture #3). A family living area and dining room, where many of the festivities occurred were of generous size. The dining room led to the chapel which held heavy carved wood pews, wrought iron candle stands and reliquary niche (picture #4).

    A tiled courtyard sits to the rear of the building, where a lovely fountain resides. It would have been a pleasant place in which to sit, conduct business or while away the afternoon in the hot days of summer (picture #5).

    Hours are Mon.-Sat., 9am-5pm; Sun. 10 am-5pm.

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    Spanish Governor's Palace

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Dec 13, 2006

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    The misleadingly plain exterior of the Palace
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    The Spanish Governor's Palace was built in 1722. Originally a military post built to help defend the region's missions, it served as the seat of the Spanish Government in Tejas from 1772 until 1821.

    The main areas inside the Palace are the chapel, the chamber for the creation of law, the main ballroom, the Governor's quarters, guests quarters, children's room, family room, and the kitchen with storage loft. Behind the house is a small, tranquil garden.

    The unique "Legend of the Doors" is the story of the various symbols carved around the door frames. Though seemingly random, when followed in order they relate the story of the Spanish arrival and conquest of the new world.

    Entrance is just $1.50

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    Spanish Governor's Palace

    by Tom_Fields Written Oct 4, 2006

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    This mid-18th century building served as the official residence of the Spanish governor of this province. Now a national historic landmark, it is furnished with period pieces, providing a close look at colonial life. After the Alamo, this is San Antonio's most significant historic structure.

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    Spanish Governors Palace

    by keeweechic Updated Sep 10, 2006

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    A national historic landmark was originally the quarters of the commander for Spanish troops. He actually established a fort here to guard against colonisation by the French. It was initially intended to be the residence of the presidio (fort) commander but then it came to symbolise the seat of the Texas government in 1722. (open 7 days).

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    San Fernando Cathedral

    by basstbn Written Jan 23, 2006

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    San Fernando Cathedral facade
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    Construction on this edifice began in 1731, soon after colonists from the Canary Islands began settling in this area, and was finished in 1750. San Fernando is the oldest cathedral sanctuary in the US and was the site of a papal visit in 1987. Mexican General Santa Ana raised the red flag of no quarter from the cathedral during the siege of the Alamo in 1836.

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    Governers Palace

    by sswagner Written Feb 7, 2005
    Courtyard in Governers Palace

    This historic site is often overlooked in favor of the Alamo and other missions. It is not particularly palacial, yet the Spanish Governer's Palace is very important in historical significance. This area was once ruled from here, and now the small compound has been restored to reflect the Spanish influence in San Antonio. There are several rooms that can be viewed as well as the nice courtyard in the back of the building. There was an admission charge, however it was very inexpensive. The palace can be found in the middle of downtown San Antonio

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    Patio of the Governor's Palace

    by Djinn76 Written Dec 28, 2003

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    At the rear of the Palace, the rooms open onto this charming patio with a, fountain and a well. I have really been surprised by the tropical vegetation but then realized we were at the same latitude as North Africa…

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    The Spanish Governor's Palace

    by Djinn76 Written Dec 28, 2003

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    This is an excellent and well-restored example of a large Spanish colonial townhouse. It is also the only remaining example in Texas of an aristocratic eighteenth century Spanish residence. The exact date of erection of the building is not known, although the keystone over the main door bears the arms of the Hapsburgs and the date 1749.
    By the time the city acquired the building, it had been considerably altered. It has finally been restored in 1929 and is now open to visitors as a museum.
    There are 10 rooms and a loft, all furnished with Spanish Colonial period pieces. The rooms are presently designated as: chapel entrance hall, ballroom, office of the governor, dining room, living room, family bedroom, kitchen, stairway, terrace, and bedroom.
    Entrance fee is only a couple of dollar and this is really worth it!

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    Governor's Residence

    by el_ruso Written Jul 26, 2005

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    A picturesque adobe-style building is nice, but can't be called a Governor's Palace, though ;) It is located in the downtown area.

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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Spanish Governor's Palace

    by Jim_Eliason Written Jun 13, 2004

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    Spanish Governor's Palace

    The former residence of the Spanish Governor. Now a museum with a nominal entry charge.

    Fairly humble for a "palace" but a great place to visit to see a period homestead.

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