Fun things to do in Waxahachie

  • Things to Do
    by msbrandysue
  • Things to Do
    by msbrandysue
  • Things to Do
    by msbrandysue

Most Viewed Things to Do in Waxahachie

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    The Old Spalding Building

    by VeronicaG Updated May 18, 2007

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    The guide noted the name "Spalding" on the front steps of this building. Yes, there it was spelled out in green tiles on a white background edged in a classic Greek border. Hmm, interesting!

    This was the name of the family who owned these two attached buildings (1895). The red structure has a brick cornice and frieze accenting it, while the green painted building is stuccoed.

    One side was used as a mortuary and the other as a furniture business. The guide points out that "it was logical to combine businesses, since the local cabinetmaker/furniture dealer also made coffins and was one of the few people in town who had a wagon large enough to carry them."

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    • Women's Travel
    • Seniors

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    The City Hall

    by VeronicaG Updated Mar 12, 2007

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    With town map in hand we crossed off sites of importance one by one.

    This is the Old Federal building, built in 1914. Although its original purpose was to house federal offices and the Post Office, it is now the City Hall. It certainly has a stately look to it!

    Neoclassical characteristics, such as the tall, sturdy columns of the type used in Greek architecture, linteled door and window openings, pilasters in low relief and profile of the hipped roof are evident in this structure.

    Original bronze lamp posts accent the entryway.

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    Scarborough Faire

    by msbrandysue Updated Sep 15, 2009

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    I can't remember why I chose to come here. I think I saw it in Texas Highways...

    I asked my aunt if she wanted to go and she said she had been meaning to go for sometime. So we made our way to Waxahacie and parked in the grassy field. What awaited us impressed us both. And we're planning more trips. :)

    Now, as you're walking through the parking field with couples, families, and the like, dressed in craaaaaazy costumes you start to wonder, "uhhhhh what am I getting myself into?!?" Then you pay your $22 and walk into the madhouse. It's crazy, really. It's like walking into a Monty Python Renaissance.

    There are jousts, fire breathers, fairies, sword fights, etc, etc....and all with beer and margaritas :D

    One of the best things is that it runs like 8 weekends in a row AND on Memorial Day so if you get busy you can still make it. It's not a hit and miss.

    The downfalls: be careful of the traffic! Since it is in a field....there's only a one way road there and back.
    Also, wear sunscreen!
    Drink plenty of water!
    And it ends pretty early....around sunset, but since there's no lights I guess that's the best....Just enough time to make you want to come back next year.

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    The Adornments

    by keeweechic Updated May 10, 2003

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    The exterior of this red granite building is adorned with beautiful young girls and gruesome gargoyles. The sculptures of these adornments came from Italy and there is a legend that Harry Hurley feel in love with a beautiful local girl called Mabel Frame. His initial carvings immortalized her beauty and when she rejected his interest his carving turned to ugly, twisted, tortured contortions
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    Historic Tour of Waxahachie

    by keeweechic Updated Jan 2, 2004

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    Waxahachie has one of the States richest and most organised collections of turn-of-the-century residential and commercial buildings. The city is well marked with sign posts showing a historic drive you can take. A lot of these houses sit on narrow streets, so stopping and parking is fairly difficult at times. There are a significant amount of historical sites that still remain right in the heart of the city. Much of the downtown area remains unchanged. About twenty percent of all the Texas buildings in the National Register of Historic Places are in Waxahachie.

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    The Trippet-Shive House

    by keeweechic Updated Dec 19, 2002

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    This house was built in 1896 for a banker and civic leader H. W. Trippet, it was then sold to Walter E. Shive who owned the Waxahachie seed, grain and coal store. The home is indicative of the houses built at the turn of the century in this neighbourhood and features cedar fish-scale shingles, a wraparound porch and octagonal tower. It was restored by the Robert Bell Family in 1983.
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    The Patrick, Marshall T. House

    by keeweechic Updated Jan 2, 2004

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    This house is listed on the Historic register and is on the 'historic tour'. It was built in 1899 and is one of the cities best examples of Queen Anne style architecture. There is a round corner asymmetrical floor plan. On the property there is the original outbuildings such as a barn, windmill house, servants quarters, arbour and 'pit' (which is an underground hot house). The original owner operated a freight and grocery business before he founded a bank in 1881 which later merged with the Citizens National Bank. The home is privately owned by Patrick descendants.

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    Richard Ellis

    by keeweechic Written Dec 15, 2002

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    Richard Ellis was President of the March, 1836, Independence Convention at Washington-on-the-Brazos, which declared the independence of Texas from Mexico. Ellis County was named after him. He was born and educated in Virginia 1781 and died in 1846 with the reports saying that "Judge Ellis came to his death suddenly by his clothes taking fire." There is a 1936 Centennial Marker placed here.
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    Hancock Building

    by keeweechic Written Dec 15, 2002

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    This Victorian style building was built by businessman William F. Lewis and Ellis County Judge M. B. Templeton in 1890. The property was purchased in 1890 by a well-known defense attorney for his law offices. Later the building was used for a grocery store, Justice of the Peace and real estate, insurance office. Next door is the Ellis County Historical museum.
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    Missouri-Kansas-Texas depot

    by keeweechic Written Dec 15, 2002

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    Although the Houston and Texas Central Railroad was first to arrive in Waxahachie, the tracks of the Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad were to become the more preferred transportation line. This old depot is now owned by The Nay Company and it is their company office. Little has been changed in the renovations.
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    Take a driving tour

    by sswagner Written Jul 27, 2008

    This is an excellent town for taking the local driving tours. Please see my travelogue for more photos of the houses. The Ellis County Museum, which is on the courthouse square, has a driving map available with a wealth of information about the structures themselves. Besides the downtown region, there will be several historic districts with the houses that make Waxahachie unique in Texas. There will also be churches, a library, a bridge, depots, and other structures on the routes. Allow for plenty of time to really get an appreciation for Waxahachie. It is well suited for driving and pulling the car aside when necessary.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Architecture

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    Memorial to the People

    by keeweechic Updated Jan 2, 2004

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    This is a memorial erected to both the living and the dead of Ellis County who wore the 'grey'. This memorial was erected in 1912 by the Daughters of the Confederacy.

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    Citizen's National Bank Building

    by keeweechic Written Dec 15, 2002

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    The was built in a Romanesque Revival style around the time the courthouse was completed. The original tower is now gone from the existing landmark building

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    IOOF - Odd Fellows Building

    by keeweechic Updated May 10, 2003

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    This building was built in 1895 in a Romanesque style. There is a central staircase and delicate carvings.
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    Waxahachie City Hall

    by keeweechic Updated Dec 25, 2007

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    The new 60.000 sqft city hall was only opened in August 2002. There are several large function rooms which are rented out for various exhibitions, conferences and performances.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip

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